Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • September 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 9
    By John McCord, DPM
    2,759 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    I ran into a young family physician in the hospital last week. He is one of the sharpest new doctors in our community and refers to podiatrists often. He looked terrible and seemed almost in shock. He let me know his job had just been terminated at the clinic where he was employed. He had one day to discharge his patients from the hospital or turn them over to other physicians. He was being replaced by a physician’s assistant. The bad stuff that our profession dealt with in the 1990s because of health care reform is still happening to our MD friends. We often complained during the ‘70s an ... continue reading
    By Neal Frankel, DPM
    7,278 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    Who would have thought that when we finally went into practice after years of podiatry school and residency, we would be more dependent on third party payers for our existence than our patients? In fact, recent studies have indicated that, on the average, we spend one-half to one full hour per patient on paperwork and insurance matters. For many podiatrists to whom I have spoken, the “hassle factor” of trying to get paid from insurance companies seems to be the primary reason many of them are not happy with private practice. Keep in mind this is a game of sorts. The insurers want to keep ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,474 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    Students pursuing a career in podiatry will have a new option when Midwestern University unveils a new podiatric medicine program in October 2004. The university, located in Glendale, Ariz., will become the seventh member of the American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine (AACPM) in 2005 and its new four-year program will have slots for 30 students. Jeffrey C. Page, DPM, the Director of the Arizona Podiatric Medical Program at Midwestern University, says the program will address a strong future demand for DPMs as well as the needs of the surrounding community. Citing 1999 projectio ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    3,838 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    Three years ago, enrollments at podiatry schools were in serious decline and it was deemed a crisis situation. It got to the point where some even suggested reducing the number of podiatry schools from seven to six or perhaps five. However, experienced educators noted that enrollment trends are very cyclical and, sure enough, there have been positive increases in enrollment the last two years. According to the American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine (AACPM), the total first year enrollment at the six AACPM schools improved to 461 in 2003, a 15 percent increase from two years ... continue reading
    By Jonathan Moore, DPM
    66,342 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/03
    As the complexity and price of wound care materials seems to be reaching mind-numbing proportions, choosing the right product for your patients seems to be getting harder instead of easier. However, taking into account cost, effectiveness and availability, one would be hard pressed to find a product better than zinc oxide. Although it is most commonly associated with diaper rash ointments and Unna boot wraps, zinc oxide has remained relatively underused in podiatry offices and in wound care centers. Considering that more than 300 enzymes are dependent on zinc for activity such as matrix metal ... continue reading
    By Gerard V. Yu, DPM, Andrew Vincent, DPM, and Wissam Khoury, DPM
    18,900 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    Over the years, a multitude of techniques have been described and employed for digital arthrodesis, ranging from arthroplasty and arthrodesis to flexor tendon transfer and lesser digital implants. Each procedure has a place in surgical correction of digital deformities. Digital arthrodesis, in particular, provides permanent and reliable correction of deformities and is considered by the senior author to be a favored technique, especially when it comes to managing digital deformities of a biomechanical etiology. Two fundamental techniques, the end-to-end arthrodesis and the peg-in-hole arthro ... continue reading
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM
    17,192 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    Keck first described tarsal tunnel syndrome in the literature back in 1962 and it remains a controversial topic today.1 While tarsal tunnel syndrome is a prevalent and common condition, lower extremity peripheral nerve entrapments and other nerve pathology can be clinically difficult to appreciate and understand. Needless to say, making a decision to proceed with surgical intervention for this condition can also be difficult. Experienced practitioners with a high degree of neurological understanding and appreciation for peripheral nerve pathology are more likely to focus on these p ... continue reading
    By James Q. Del Rosso, DO, FAOCD
    6,221 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    Cutaneous malignancies and benign neoplasms simulating malignancy commonly affect the distal lower extremity, including the foot. One may see a variety of malignancy categories such as epithelial tumors, adnexal neoplasms, melanoytic neoplasms, vascular neoplasms and soft tissue tumors. Histologic confirmation of diagnosis is essentially mandatory, warranting the need to send all tissue specimens, including biopsy, incisional and excisional specimens, for pathology examination. In some cases, the pathologist may incorporate immunohistochemical stains to differentiate specific tumor types. D ... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    7,621 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    A very difficult patient for me to treat is a young patient who has rheumatoid arthritis with severe deformity of the foot and ankle. This is typically a patient whose age may range from the late 20s to late 50s and is active except for his or her foot pain. With this in mind, let’s consider the following case study. A 27-year-old female presented with a 12-year history of rheumatoid arthritis and extreme pain and deformity of the forefoot. While both feet are painful, she says the left foot is more severe than the right. The patient says the pain is in the region of the lateral fourth and ... continue reading

    3,632 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    When working with compression bandages, it can be tricky to find just the right level of compression. That’s where ProGuide comes in. The Smith & Nephew product, a multi-layer bandage system, can help you get to the exact level of compression you need when treating venous leg ulcers. ProGuide utilizes the company’s Vari-Stretch™ Technology and is composed of three layers: a non-adherent wound contact layer, a super-absorbent padding layer and an outer compression layer, according to the company. It is available in three sizes, allowing you to find bandages for different ankle size ... continue reading