Volume 16 - Issue 8 - August 2003

Practice Builders »

Enhance Patient Compliance By Targeting Different Learning Styles

By Chris Vance, DPM | 9602 reads | 0 comments

In over 25 years of practice, I have witnessed the importance of recognizing patient learning styles. As a physician and now as a practice consultant, I have found that communication is of strategic importance. As physicians, we must educate our patients first through effective communication. Only then will our patients understand their condition and agree to our recommended course of treatment.
“If teachers teach exclusively in a manner that favors the students’ less preferred learning style, the students’ discomfort level can interfere with their ability to learn and memorize,” not



Feature »

A Helpful Primer On Total Contact Casts

By Jeffrey Jensen, DPM, Anna Weber, DPM, Eric Jaakola, DPM, and Matthew Dairman, DPM | 22503 reads | 1 comments

Neuropathic foot ulcers are the most common precursor of lower–extremity amputation in patients with diabetes.1 In the podiatry literature, as well as other wound care literature, the total contact cast (TCC) has long been considered the gold standard for treating non-infected, neuropathic foot ulcerations.2 The TCC heals wounds by reducing weightbearing pressure and shear force to the plantar aspect of the foot. The unique well-molded, minimally-padded construct of the cast allows it to maintain “total contact” with the foot and lower leg.
Clinical results overwh



Feature »

How To Handle Lapidus Complications

By Neal M. Blitz, DPM, and Ronald G. Ray, DPM, PT | 26947 reads | 0 comments

The lapidus arthrodesis for the treatment of symptomatic hallux valgus remains a controversial subject in foot surgery. Since its inception in the early 1900s, the lapidus arthrodesis has been abandoned by many surgeons mainly due to its high complication rate, particularly nonunion. However, it has regained popularity in recent years due to better fixation techniques and an improved understanding of first ray biomechanics.
The major advantage of performing a metatarsocuneiform arthrodesis is it allows you to realign the first metatarsal at the apex of the deformity along with stabilizing th



Continuing Education »

A Guide To Treatments For Onychomycosis

By John Mozena, DPM | 16804 reads | 0 comments

Onychomycosis is the number one diagnosed and treated disease by podiatrists today. While the disease was first recognized in the United States in 1928, it has only recently been brought under control with drugs that have been introduced in the last 10 years. With the advent of safer oral and topical medications, there has been a renewed focus on increasing efficacy rates. The current research seems to be centered on synergistic activity of oral and topical medications as well as different vehicles to add additional penetration of the medication.
Onychomycosis is present in 2 to 3 percent



Feature »

Reinventing The Delivery Of Quality Care

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 6969 reads | 0 comments

There are some consistent themes that have emerged from this year’s roundup of leading innovations in podiatry. “Minimally invasive” seems to be the phrasing of choice as the technology seems to be more and more focused on reducing patient pain and downtime via more targeted surgical solutions. In addition to products geared toward common podiatric ailments such as flatfoot, plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis, there are other modalities in the mix that may not be on the cusp of mainstream acceptance, but show intriguing promise for the future.
Without further delay, here is what



Editor's Perspective »

Can The Present Help Shape The Future?

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 2164 reads | 0 comments

There are significant disparities between the various podiatric residency programs across the country. For example, at the University of Texas, residents get “five hours per week of lectures and topic discussions,” according to one of the professors. Yet another educator who was accustomed to hearing four or five lectures a week during his residency concedes that the current crop of residents at his facility “are lucky to get one or two a week.”
In order to help address some of these issues, Alan Sherman, DPM, Michael Shore, DPM, and Jay Lieberman, DPM, have teamed up to create PRES