Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • August 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 8
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
    7,975 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/03
    Exercise plays an important role in the management of both insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) and non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM). Regular exercise, especially aerobic exercise, strengthens the heart and circulatory system, thus reducing the chance of heart disease and stroke. It helps decrease blood cholesterol and increases the levels of the “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in the blood. Exercise lowers blood glucose levels, both during exercise and for several hours afterward. Walking is probably the best, safest and least expensive form of exercise. It can fit into almost a ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    7,243 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/03
    There are some consistent themes that have emerged from this year’s roundup of leading innovations in podiatry. “Minimally invasive” seems to be the phrasing of choice as the technology seems to be more and more focused on reducing patient pain and downtime via more targeted surgical solutions. In addition to products geared toward common podiatric ailments such as flatfoot, plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis, there are other modalities in the mix that may not be on the cusp of mainstream acceptance, but show intriguing promise for the future. Without further delay, here is what ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    3,223 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/03
    When fabricating an orthotic, flexibility and convenience are essential. You want the ability to start over if you make any mistakes and you need options as far as the styles of material. Another must is an orthotic that you can make quickly and easily, and one that you can use in a variety of shoes. The features of the DBX6® enhance the convenience of fabricating orthotics. At just 1.5 mm thick, the device offers cross-shoe flexibility and facilitates effective shoe compliance, according to the manufacturer Northwest Podiatric Laboratory. At 1.2 ounces, the DBX6 is the lightest material av ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    2,321 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/03
    There are significant disparities between the various podiatric residency programs across the country. For example, at the University of Texas, residents get “five hours per week of lectures and topic discussions,” according to one of the professors. Yet another educator who was accustomed to hearing four or five lectures a week during his residency concedes that the current crop of residents at his facility “are lucky to get one or two a week.” In order to help address some of these issues, Alan Sherman, DPM, Michael Shore, DPM, and Jay Lieberman, DPM, have teamed up to create PRES ... continue reading
    By Chris Vance, DPM
    10,071 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/03
    In over 25 years of practice, I have witnessed the importance of recognizing patient learning styles. As a physician and now as a practice consultant, I have found that communication is of strategic importance. As physicians, we must educate our patients first through effective communication. Only then will our patients understand their condition and agree to our recommended course of treatment. “If teachers teach exclusively in a manner that favors the students’ less preferred learning style, the students’ discomfort level can interfere with their ability to learn and memorize,” not ... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    1,829 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/03
    I try to learn from my mistakes. I haven’t always succeeded. I was 11 when my parents first allowed me to go to the county fair alone. The midway or carnival had been forbidden territory to me because of the naughty side shows, gambling opportunities and the thrill rides. My mother would not have approved. I could always go to confession on the way home. Three dollars was the budget for my first solo trip to the fair. I had just collected from my paper route customers and was carrying 10 silver dollars, five in each pocket. After paying the 50-cent admission, I had $2.50 to blow. I planned ... continue reading
    By Jeffrey Jensen, DPM, Anna Weber, DPM, Eric Jaakola, DPM, and Matthew Dairman, DPM
    23,642 reads | 1 comments | 08/03/03
    Neuropathic foot ulcers are the most common precursor of lower–extremity amputation in patients with diabetes.1 In the podiatry literature, as well as other wound care literature, the total contact cast (TCC) has long been considered the gold standard for treating non-infected, neuropathic foot ulcerations.2 The TCC heals wounds by reducing weightbearing pressure and shear force to the plantar aspect of the foot. The unique well-molded, minimally-padded construct of the cast allows it to maintain “total contact” with the foot and lower leg. Clinical results overwh ... continue reading
    By Adrianne P.S. Smith, MD, FACEP
    18,707 reads | 2 comments | 08/03/03
    Wound healing progresses through a series of processes, which include the formation of granulation tissue, epithelialization and connective tissue remodeling. These events require continuous modification of the complex cellular support matrix. This matrix is comprised of: structural proteins (collagen and elastin); specialized “anchoring” proteins (fibronectin, laminin and fibrillin); and proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate, heparin, dermatan sulfate and keratan sulfate. Blood vessels that deliver oxygen and nutrients to ... continue reading
    By Neal M. Blitz, DPM, and Ronald G. Ray, DPM, PT
    28,231 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/03
    The lapidus arthrodesis for the treatment of symptomatic hallux valgus remains a controversial subject in foot surgery. Since its inception in the early 1900s, the lapidus arthrodesis has been abandoned by many surgeons mainly due to its high complication rate, particularly nonunion. However, it has regained popularity in recent years due to better fixation techniques and an improved understanding of first ray biomechanics. The major advantage of performing a metatarsocuneiform arthrodesis is it allows you to realign the first metatarsal at the apex of the deformity along with stabilizing th ... continue reading

    2,226 reads | 0 comments | 08/03/03
    Who isn’t always on the lookout for new devices to make reimbursement less of a hassle? In order to make the process a little easier, you may want to consider the Smartdop® 20EX with Smart-V-Link™ Vascular Software. The product features Smart-V-Link Vascular Software and is complete with ABI and TBI software. It reportedly helps facilitate easier documentation of preoperative procedures for the patient’s record and for reimbursement purposes as well, according to the company Koven Technology. It adds that the software can also automatically calculate ratios and print ... continue reading