Volume 16 - Issue 7 - July 2003

Diabetes Watch »

Choosing Medications For Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

By Matt Rampetsreiter, DPM, and Raymond Abdo, DPM | 26348 reads | 1 comments

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is very common sequelae of diabetes mellitus. Patients often complain of burning, tingling, numbness and even sharp stabbing pain. These symptoms can cause sleep disturbances as well as problems with daily activities. Many primary care physicians and podiatrists overlook these symptoms which, in most cases, have been going on for years.



Diagnostic Dilemmas »

When Achilles Tendonitis Is Not Caused By A Tight Achilles

By Babak Baravarian, DPM | 13829 reads | 0 comments

A patient comes into the office with an aching sensation in the posterior aspect of the right leg. He notes the pain has been increasing in the past two to three months and has gotten worse since he began to exercise. Specifically, in the past three weeks, the patient says he has had tightness in the Achilles tendon region.
During that specific time period, the patient notes that he began a walking program on a slight hill by his house. He notes the hill provides a slight exertion that has been excellent for his stamina. The patient says he has only had the pain after a long climb and when h



Surgical Pearls »

How To Minimize Post-Op Pain After Reconstructive Surgery

By J. Michael Miller, DPM | 9656 reads | 0 comments

Minimizing postoperative discomfort for patients is a common goal of all surgeons. Techniques for achieving this goal seem to vary significantly among surgical specialties. Unfortunately, patients often have preconceived expectations that they will experience considerable discomfort after foot surgery. This is usually based on their experience with other surgical procedures or from discussions with other people in their community who have expressed their “experience” with foot surgery.
This fear of significant postoperative discomfort occasionally will preclude some patients from undergo



Wound Care Q&A »

Roundtable Insights On Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 14948 reads | 0 comments

While there is not an overwhelming amount of literature on hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO), the recent decision by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to cover the use of HBO in treating diabetic foot wounds has fueled new discussions on the potential efficacy of the modality. With this in mind, our panelists discuss their experiences in using HBO, the current literature on the subject and reimbursement issues.

Q: What has been your experience in using hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) to treat lower extremity wounds?
A:
Leon Brill, DPM, says he has had a “very posi



Technology In Practice »

Can The Active Off-Loading Insole Reinvent Care For Plantar Ulcers?

By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor | 5971 reads | 0 comments

With the rate of diabetes cases skyrocketing and the number of lower-limb amputations also on the rise, a new insole may provide hope for those suffering the adverse effects of plantar ulcers. Used in conjunction with the company’s Active Off-Loading Walker (formerly known as the DH Walker), Woundcare Shoes or DH Pressure Relief Shoe, Royce Medical’s Active Off-Loading Insole has been deemed “the platinum solution for healing plantar ulcers.”
Hoping to alleviate some of the pain and trauma associated with treating plantar ulcers, the company set out to provide an “active environment



Point-Counterpoint »

Are Tissue Replacements Cost Effective?

24903 reads | 0 comments

Yes, these authors say tissue replacements can facilitate shorter healing times and reduce the risk of complications from chronic wounds.

By Jason R. Hanft, DPM, Andre Williams, DPM, Constantine Kyramarios, DPM, and Kerry Temar, DPM, MS

The goals in treating diabetic foot ulcers are to obtain wound closure as quickly as possible, lower the probability of amputation and decrease recurrent ulcerations. Timely healing is important because the longer a diabetic foot ulcer remains unhealed, the greater the risk for infection, hospitalization and progression of the ulcer to require lim



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