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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • June 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 6
    By Nicholas M. Romansky, DPM, and David C. Erfle, DPM
    37,527 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Shin splints are common among runners and individuals who participate in soccer, football, field hockey, lacrosse, etc. This overuse injury usually develops gradually over a period of weeks to months but may occur after a single, excessive bout of exercise. Individuals typically complain of pain in one of two locations: the lower inside half of the tibia and, less commonly, the upper outside portion of the tibia. Shin splints, also known as medial tibial stress syndrome, are an inflammation of the soft tissue surrounding the bone lining of the tibia at the origin of several leg muscles. Exce ... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,576 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    I walked into the operating room 10 minutes early as usual. The case was a complex repair of multiple fractures from a SUV vs. Harley wreck. None of the fractures were difficult to repair but there were four to set and fixate. The nurses laughed quietly when I hung a numbered checklist next to the X-rays. Everybody in the room laughed except the anesthesiologist, who, like me, is a licensed pilot. Checklists save your life when you’re flying an airplane. Forgetting a small detail like the fuel level or the proper functioning of controls can result in a crash so we use checklists. Surgery ... continue reading
    By Tamara D. Fishman, DPM
    70,861 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Puncture wounds caused by foreign bodies can be deceptive in appearance. This is because many show little or no signs of external damage, yet they may have caused a serious internal injury. Some of the more common objects that cause these injuries include nails, pins or tacks, wood, glass and thorns. There is usually little bleeding from puncture wounds and these wounds seem to close almost immediately. However, this does not mean treatment is not necessary. Puncture wounds do have a risk of becoming infected. The object that caused the wound may carry spores of tetanus or other bacteria ... continue reading