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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • June 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 6
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
    63,779 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The dancer’s feet are comparable to a concert pianist’s hands. Extensive training, often beginning before the age of 10, is common, especially among girls. Through the years, changing styles and great leaps have placed increased strain on the foot, resulting in the variety of dance injuries we must diagnose and treat today. In a follow-up to the last column (see “How To Identify And Treat Common Ballet Injuries,” pg. 70, April issue), let’s take a closer look at other common foot and ankle injuries that affect ballet dancers. The most common acute injury in theatrical dance is the... continue reading
    Phytacare Alginate Hydrogel dressing promotes a moist physiologic environment.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    4,017 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    It can be challenging to maintain an optimum environment for wound healing in certain patients. It can also be challenging to sift through the vast array of wound care dressings on the market and find the right one that will help your patient. However, you may welcome the arrival of a new dressing that is reportedly cost-effective, easy to use and has a wide range of potential indications. You can use the phytacare Alginate Hydrogel wound dressing to treat a wide variety of lower extremity wounds, ranging from diabetic ulcers and pressure ulcers to abrasions and second-degree burns, accordin... continue reading
    This X-ray shows early periostitis and a fracture of the tibial cortex in a 33-year-old male who had lower shin pain.
    By Nicholas M. Romansky, DPM, and David C. Erfle, DPM
    36,718 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Shin splints are common among runners and individuals who participate in soccer, football, field hockey, lacrosse, etc. This overuse injury usually develops gradually over a period of weeks to months but may occur after a single, excessive bout of exercise. Individuals typically complain of pain in one of two locations: the lower inside half of the tibia and, less commonly, the upper outside portion of the tibia. Shin splints, also known as medial tibial stress syndrome, are an inflammation of the soft tissue surrounding the bone lining of the tibia at the origin of several leg muscles. Exce... continue reading