Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • June 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 6
    By Michael D. Dujela, DPM, and Eric Espensen, DPM
    10,810 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Yes, Dr. Dujela points to key principles and case studies that convey the need for surgical treatment in facilitating curative results. The notion that osteomyelitis is “primarily” a surgical disease does not discount the importance of adjunctive antibiotic therapy. However, in the presence of established osteomyelitis, surgical treatment should be the mainstay with antibiotics playing a supporting role. The basic philosophy in the surgical treatment of osteomyelitis is foot salvage. Essentially, we are attempting to achieve a balance between resecting adequate bone for curative resul ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    8,001 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Have you been seeing an increase in lateral ankle pain among baby boomers who have recently resumed regular exercising or sports activities? Sports medicine experts say the pain may be the result of old ankle sprains that haven’t healed properly and recommend checking the ankles of these patients for chronic instability. An estimated 25 percent of sports injuries involve the foot or ankle, according to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), and a majority of these result from incomplete rehabilitation of earlier injuries. Robert Duggan, DPM, says rigorous physical activi ... continue reading
    By John H. Walter Jr., DPM, MS, and Larry R. Goss, DPM
    115,168 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Soft tissue tumors may often be overlooked or mistaken as “simple lesions.” For example, ganglion cysts occur so frequently in the foot and ankle that it has often led to the careless assumption that every asymptomatic, soft, movable mass represents a benign lesion. Unfortunately, this lackadaisical confidence can lead to misdiagnosis and disaster in certain situations. Although rare, some “simple lesions” may actually represent a malignant process that goes undiagnosed until skeletal metastasis occurs or amputation is required. This tragedy could potentially lead to malpractice liti ... continue reading