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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • June 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 6
    By Billie C. Bradford, MBA
    19,362 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    It happens every year. All healthcare professionals have learned to anticipate annual changes in Medicare regulations, coding and reimbursement. However, this year’s delays and payment uncertainties definitely qualify 2003 as one of the worst years yet for physicians trying to do some financial planning for their practices. For starters, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released its 2003 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule and Final Rule on Dec. 31, 2002, two months behind schedule. As a result of that delay, the payment rates for 2003 were amended to take effect on March 1, ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    1,931 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Perhaps you have seen delayed wound healing recently that seemed particularly stubborn and mystifying. Another patient may have unusual lower extremity swelling. In the midst of a seemingly simple surgical procedure for another patient, you notice excessive bleeding. All of these side effects may be possible if you’re treating patients who do not divulge they are taking an herbal medication. Approximately 10 to 12 percent of adults in the United States use herbal medications, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other recent estimates. In the article “Herbal M ... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
    73,525 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    The dancer’s feet are comparable to a concert pianist’s hands. Extensive training, often beginning before the age of 10, is common, especially among girls. Through the years, changing styles and great leaps have placed increased strain on the foot, resulting in the variety of dance injuries we must diagnose and treat today. In a follow-up to the last column (see “How To Identify And Treat Common Ballet Injuries,” pg. 70, April issue), let’s take a closer look at other common foot and ankle injuries that affect ballet dancers. The most common acute injury in theatrical dance is the ... continue reading