Volume 16 - Issue 6 - June 2003

Feature »

How To Triumph Over Shin Pain

By Nicholas M. Romansky, DPM, and David C. Erfle, DPM | 34814 reads | 0 comments

Shin splints are common among runners and individuals who participate in soccer, football, field hockey, lacrosse, etc. This overuse injury usually develops gradually over a period of weeks to months but may occur after a single, excessive bout of exercise. Individuals typically complain of pain in one of two locations: the lower inside half of the tibia and, less commonly, the upper outside portion of the tibia.
Shin splints, also known as medial tibial stress syndrome, are an inflammation of the soft tissue surrounding the bone lining of the tibia at the origin of several leg muscles. Exce



Continuing Education »

How To Diagnose And Treat Foreign Body Injuries

By Tamara D. Fishman, DPM | 65126 reads | 0 comments

Puncture wounds caused by foreign bodies can be deceptive in appearance. This is because many show little or no signs of external damage, yet they may have caused a serious internal injury. Some of the more common objects that cause these injuries include nails, pins or tacks, wood, glass and thorns. There is usually little bleeding from puncture wounds and these wounds seem to close almost immediately.

However, this does not mean treatment is not necessary. Puncture wounds do have a risk of becoming infected. The object that caused the wound may carry spores of tetanus or other bacteria



Feature »

Eight Steps To Ensuring OSHA Compliance

By Steven D. Chinn, DPM, CHE | 7537 reads | 0 comments

Is your practice as safe as it needs to be? When Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1971, the intent was to decrease the number of workplace injuries, illnesses and deaths. In 1999, there were over 5.7 million occupational injuries and illnesses in the United States. Approximately 6.3 employees out of every 100 experienced a job-related injury or illness.
All medical practices are expected to comply with the regulations regardless of the number of employees. Some of the critical areas emphasized over the years include injury and illness prevention, em



Point-Counterpoint »

Is Osteomyelitis Primarily A Surgical Disease?

By Michael D. Dujela, DPM, and Eric Espensen, DPM | 10206 reads | 0 comments

Yes, Dr. Dujela points to key principles and case studies that convey the need for surgical treatment in facilitating curative results.

The notion that osteomyelitis is “primarily” a surgical disease does not discount the importance of adjunctive antibiotic therapy. However, in the presence of established osteomyelitis, surgical treatment should be the mainstay with antibiotics playing a supporting role.
The basic philosophy in the surgical treatment of osteomyelitis is foot salvage. Essentially, we are attempting to achieve a balance between resecting adequate bone for curative resul



Feature »

How To Detect Soft Tissue Tumors

By John H. Walter Jr., DPM, MS, and Larry R. Goss, DPM | 100897 reads | 0 comments

Soft tissue tumors may often be overlooked or mistaken as “simple lesions.” For example, ganglion cysts occur so frequently in the foot and ankle that it has often led to the careless assumption that every asymptomatic, soft, movable mass represents a benign lesion. Unfortunately, this lackadaisical confidence can lead to misdiagnosis and disaster in certain situations.
Although rare, some “simple lesions” may actually represent a malignant process that goes undiagnosed until skeletal metastasis occurs or amputation is required. This tragedy could potentially lead to malpractice liti



Editor's Perspective »

Are Your Patients Taking Herbal Medications?

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 1600 reads | 0 comments

Perhaps you have seen delayed wound healing recently that seemed particularly stubborn and mystifying. Another patient may have unusual lower extremity swelling. In the midst of a seemingly simple surgical procedure for another patient, you notice excessive bleeding. All of these side effects may be possible if you’re treating patients who do not divulge they are taking an herbal medication.
Approximately 10 to 12 percent of adults in the United States use herbal medications, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other recent estimates. In the article “Herbal M



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