Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • June 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 6
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    4,072 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    It can be challenging to maintain an optimum environment for wound healing in certain patients. It can also be challenging to sift through the vast array of wound care dressings on the market and find the right one that will help your patient. However, you may welcome the arrival of a new dressing that is reportedly cost-effective, easy to use and has a wide range of potential indications. You can use the phytacare Alginate Hydrogel wound dressing to treat a wide variety of lower extremity wounds, ranging from diabetic ulcers and pressure ulcers to abrasions and second-degree burns, accordin ... continue reading
    By Nicholas M. Romansky, DPM, and David C. Erfle, DPM
    37,553 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Shin splints are common among runners and individuals who participate in soccer, football, field hockey, lacrosse, etc. This overuse injury usually develops gradually over a period of weeks to months but may occur after a single, excessive bout of exercise. Individuals typically complain of pain in one of two locations: the lower inside half of the tibia and, less commonly, the upper outside portion of the tibia. Shin splints, also known as medial tibial stress syndrome, are an inflammation of the soft tissue surrounding the bone lining of the tibia at the origin of several leg muscles. Exce ... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,577 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    I walked into the operating room 10 minutes early as usual. The case was a complex repair of multiple fractures from a SUV vs. Harley wreck. None of the fractures were difficult to repair but there were four to set and fixate. The nurses laughed quietly when I hung a numbered checklist next to the X-rays. Everybody in the room laughed except the anesthesiologist, who, like me, is a licensed pilot. Checklists save your life when you’re flying an airplane. Forgetting a small detail like the fuel level or the proper functioning of controls can result in a crash so we use checklists. Surgery ... continue reading
    By Tamara D. Fishman, DPM
    70,912 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Puncture wounds caused by foreign bodies can be deceptive in appearance. This is because many show little or no signs of external damage, yet they may have caused a serious internal injury. Some of the more common objects that cause these injuries include nails, pins or tacks, wood, glass and thorns. There is usually little bleeding from puncture wounds and these wounds seem to close almost immediately. However, this does not mean treatment is not necessary. Puncture wounds do have a risk of becoming infected. The object that caused the wound may carry spores of tetanus or other bacteria ... continue reading
    By Gary M. Rothenberg, DPM, CWS
    15,754 reads | 1 comments | 06/03/03
    In the course of a single day, we often see frustrating patients who do not follow the seemingly simple instructions that we give to them. Treating non-compliant diabetic patients, specifically those who are dealing with issues of wound care, infections and even amputations, can be particularly challenging. When I use the term non-compliant, I am sure that everyone immediately visualizes his or her most memorable patient. You may refer to this patient as a problem patient, a troublemaker or any other choice word, but are these negative judgments of patients making the challenging cases even ... continue reading
    By Steven D. Chinn, DPM, CHE
    7,903 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Is your practice as safe as it needs to be? When Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1971, the intent was to decrease the number of workplace injuries, illnesses and deaths. In 1999, there were over 5.7 million occupational injuries and illnesses in the United States. Approximately 6.3 employees out of every 100 experienced a job-related injury or illness. All medical practices are expected to comply with the regulations regardless of the number of employees. Some of the critical areas emphasized over the years include injury and illness prevention, em ... continue reading

    4,074 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Are chronic wounds throwing you for a loop? If so, you may want to consider using CellerateRX, a new wound care gel and powder that reportedly helps to jumpstart the healing process. Advanced Wound Care, the manufacturer of the product, says CellerateRX has an array of indications ranging from diabetic ulcers and surgical wounds to pressure ulcers and second-degree burns. The company notes that CellerateRX promotes and accelerates cellular regeneration by replicating the natural fibroconnective template. It can be a good modality for recalcitrant wounds as it promotes natural autolysis and ... continue reading
    By Michael D. Dujela, DPM, and Eric Espensen, DPM
    10,719 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Yes, Dr. Dujela points to key principles and case studies that convey the need for surgical treatment in facilitating curative results. The notion that osteomyelitis is “primarily” a surgical disease does not discount the importance of adjunctive antibiotic therapy. However, in the presence of established osteomyelitis, surgical treatment should be the mainstay with antibiotics playing a supporting role. The basic philosophy in the surgical treatment of osteomyelitis is foot salvage. Essentially, we are attempting to achieve a balance between resecting adequate bone for curative resul ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    7,932 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Have you been seeing an increase in lateral ankle pain among baby boomers who have recently resumed regular exercising or sports activities? Sports medicine experts say the pain may be the result of old ankle sprains that haven’t healed properly and recommend checking the ankles of these patients for chronic instability. An estimated 25 percent of sports injuries involve the foot or ankle, according to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), and a majority of these result from incomplete rehabilitation of earlier injuries. Robert Duggan, DPM, says rigorous physical activi ... continue reading
    By John H. Walter Jr., DPM, MS, and Larry R. Goss, DPM
    112,204 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/03
    Soft tissue tumors may often be overlooked or mistaken as “simple lesions.” For example, ganglion cysts occur so frequently in the foot and ankle that it has often led to the careless assumption that every asymptomatic, soft, movable mass represents a benign lesion. Unfortunately, this lackadaisical confidence can lead to misdiagnosis and disaster in certain situations. Although rare, some “simple lesions” may actually represent a malignant process that goes undiagnosed until skeletal metastasis occurs or amputation is required. This tragedy could potentially lead to malpractice liti ... continue reading