Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • May 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 5
    Total contact casts provide “the patient and the clinician with a method of healing wounds quickly,” notes Jeffrey Jensen, DPM. Dr. Jensen says he and his colleagues use about 750 TCCs a year for patients.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    9,905 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Is total contact casting (TCC) too time-consuming a modality to be used in treating plantar foot ulcerations? It’s a prevailing question that has thwarted wider use of the modality. However, a new study recently presented at the Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC) attempts to shed new light on the “time-effectiveness” of TCC. Study researchers concede there is a “relatively low use rate” of total contact casts for diabetic foot ulcers. Why? They say many do not use TCC because of the time involved in the process and frequent office visits. However, previous studies have shown th... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,811 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The scene has been played out at varying degrees throughout the country. Doctors are walking out of hospitals, practitioners are struggling to pay malpractice insurance premiums and juries are awarding millions of dollars to patients who have sued for malpractice. Many perceive a malpractice crisis is affecting the entire healthcare field and DPMs are among those who may feel the crunch. Across the United States, doctors of several disciplines have found themselves unable to practice due to malpractice costs, leaving patients unable to access healthcare. Last year, the University of Nevada M... continue reading
    By Harold Schoenhaus, DPM, Jodi Schoenhaus, DPM, and Dawn Pfeiffer, DPM
    4,443 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    One of the most commonly performed procedures in the foot is an implant arthroplasty of the first metatarsophalangeal (MPJ) joint. However, we have occasionally noted a hollow medullary canal after resecting the base of the proximal phalanx. This can cause problems with incorporation of the implant. Yet there is an intraoperative option one can use to address this problem. Adequate bone stock of the proximal phalanx is crucial for proper seating of the hemi-implant. In some cases, we have found the cancellous bone to be cystic with liquefied fat. However, there has been no evidence of cortica... continue reading