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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • May 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 5
    By Kirk M. Herring, DPM, MS
    28,349 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    Heel pain, especially pain associated with the plantar aponeurosis, is one of the most common overuse injuries affecting adults. Approximately 10 percent of runners as well as many other athletes are affected by plantar fasciitis.1 Conservative estimates have suggested more than 2 million Americans annually receive treatment for this condition.1 As common as this injury may be, there is no universally accepted etiology or treatment for this complaint. In addition to having a strong anatomical grasp of the heel (see “A Guide To Key Anatomical Considerations” below), i ... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    9,125 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    There is a great deal of satisfaction when our diabetic foot care team gets referrals for patients who were previously seen by doctors from surrounding regions and other nations. However, there is also a great deal of difficulty with poorly or improperly managed cases. In this diagnostic dilemma, I’d like to focus on one patient who was sent to us after one year of care by several doctors. The patient in question is a 70-year-old male, who was previously seen by two podiatrists and an orthopedist. His initial complaint was a small blister plantar to the first metatarsal head of his left f ... continue reading
    By Gary L. Dockery, DPM
    50,886 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    It is generally thought that about 50 percent of all warts will spontaneously resolve within six months. However, some warts may remain at the same location with no apparent change for many years and others will continue to spread, expand or enlarge with time. Warts are generally self-limiting and very harmless but may cause symptoms due to the fact that they are unsightly, cause embarrassment, impede function, become irritated or cause pain. Verrucae are commonly termed warts. These are benign intraepidermal neoplasms caused by a variety of different viruses. Papillomaviruses belong to the f ... continue reading