Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • May 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 5
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    4,443 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    Caring for your patients is a full-time job unto itself. Dealing with managed care and the business end of your practice is another full-time job. Indeed, claims processing and billing issues can be overwhelming at times. However, there are office management systems and software that can help you and your staff stay organized and efficient. One out of every three podiatrists uses the Wisdom/32 Podiatry Practice Management System, according to VitalWorks, the manufacturer of the software program. It says the Windows-based software offers a variety of helpful options. Not only can it help w ... continue reading
    By Robert A. Warriner, III, MD, and Caroline E. Fife, MD
    12,392 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    Last month, Medicare began reimbursing for hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment as an adjunctive therapy for diabetic foot ulcers. After an exhaustive review of the literature, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) concluded that “HBO therapy is clinically effective and, thus, reasonable and necessary in the treatment of certain patients with limb-threatening diabetic wounds of the lower extremity.” According to the CMS, patients must meet each of the following three criteria: • the patient has type I or type II diabetes and has a lower extremity wound that is due to diabetes; ... continue reading
    By Kirk M. Herring, DPM, MS
    31,761 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    Heel pain, especially pain associated with the plantar aponeurosis, is one of the most common overuse injuries affecting adults. Approximately 10 percent of runners as well as many other athletes are affected by plantar fasciitis.1 Conservative estimates have suggested more than 2 million Americans annually receive treatment for this condition.1 As common as this injury may be, there is no universally accepted etiology or treatment for this complaint. In addition to having a strong anatomical grasp of the heel (see “A Guide To Key Anatomical Considerations” below), i ... continue reading