Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
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  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • May 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 5
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    1,743 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Would I want justice if I underwent an amputation procedure that was later deemed to be unnecessary? You bet. Do I think this kind of clinical situation happens on a routine basis? Hardly. However, you wouldn’t know it by the seemingly skyrocketing malpractice insurance premiums being reported across the country. Escalating jury verdicts seem to play a big role. A July 2002 report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) noted there was a 76 percent increase in the average jury malpractice award from 1996 to 1999. You have to wonder how many verdicts are being fueled m... continue reading
    After you’ve reflected the extensor digitorum brevis distally, perform the Evans osteotomy through and through, I cm proximal to the calcaneaocuboid joint.
    By Kieran T. Mahan, DPM
    40,266 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Calcaneal osteotomies have been a mainstay of foot and ankle surgery for many years, and are critical in the realignment of significant foot deformities. Both varus and valgus deformities often require calcaneal deformities for correct alignment. Although a large number of calcaneal osteotomies have been described in the literature over the years, there are a few principal ones that tend to be more commonly used than others. One would perform the Dwyer osteotomy for frontal plane deformity of varus in the cavus foot. Surgeons often perform the Evans osteotomy for realignment of the adolesc... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,380 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I am occasionally asked why I write this column. The answer is simple. Writing fulfills my need to engage in an activity where if I screw up and make mistakes, there are no dire consequences and nobody gets hurt. At times, I overstate an opinion and a fellow DPM gets mad but that doesn’t count. There are aspects of my life in which it is more imperative to avoid mistakes. I’m a husband and father. I’m a doctor. I’m an instrument rated pilot. If I make mistakes in these roles, people can get hurt. I am responsible not to let mistakes occur and to pay the consequences if they do. To ma... continue reading
    A clinical trial showed that deFEET cured 100 percent of patients in 10 days, according to BioChemics.

    5,966 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When treating those who suffer from athlete’s foot, you may want to consider a new lotion that combines two ingredients to offer relief. The topical lotion deFEET® uses the advanced transdermal drug delivery system of PENtoCORE, which facilitates deeper penetration of the active ingredient of tolnaftate. BioChemics, the manufacturer of the product, says deFEET relieves athlete’s foot infection and itchy, scaly, burning feet. In fact, a clinical trial at the New England Medical Center showed that deFEET cured 100 percent of patients in 10 days, according to the... continue reading
    Total contact casts provide “the patient and the clinician with a method of healing wounds quickly,” notes Jeffrey Jensen, DPM. Dr. Jensen says he and his colleagues use about 750 TCCs a year for patients.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    9,899 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Is total contact casting (TCC) too time-consuming a modality to be used in treating plantar foot ulcerations? It’s a prevailing question that has thwarted wider use of the modality. However, a new study recently presented at the Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC) attempts to shed new light on the “time-effectiveness” of TCC. Study researchers concede there is a “relatively low use rate” of total contact casts for diabetic foot ulcers. Why? They say many do not use TCC because of the time involved in the process and frequent office visits. However, previous studies have shown th... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,805 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The scene has been played out at varying degrees throughout the country. Doctors are walking out of hospitals, practitioners are struggling to pay malpractice insurance premiums and juries are awarding millions of dollars to patients who have sued for malpractice. Many perceive a malpractice crisis is affecting the entire healthcare field and DPMs are among those who may feel the crunch. Across the United States, doctors of several disciplines have found themselves unable to practice due to malpractice costs, leaving patients unable to access healthcare. Last year, the University of Nevada M... continue reading
    By Harold Schoenhaus, DPM, Jodi Schoenhaus, DPM, and Dawn Pfeiffer, DPM
    4,439 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    One of the most commonly performed procedures in the foot is an implant arthroplasty of the first metatarsophalangeal (MPJ) joint. However, we have occasionally noted a hollow medullary canal after resecting the base of the proximal phalanx. This can cause problems with incorporation of the implant. Yet there is an intraoperative option one can use to address this problem. Adequate bone stock of the proximal phalanx is crucial for proper seating of the hemi-implant. In some cases, we have found the cancellous bone to be cystic with liquefied fat. However, there has been no evidence of cortica... continue reading
    Dog bites (as seen above) tend to be crush wounds because the dog’s teeth are dull, blunt and powerful.
    By Tamara D. Fishman, DPM
    15,428 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    As the warmer months emerge, people are more likely to tackle spring cleaning of cluttered areas, go outside without shoes and socks, and head to the beach for fun in the sun. Unfortunately, there is also an increased risk of lower-extremity bite injuries with these scenarios, whether the injuries are from dogs, insects, spiders or stingrays. Let’s start out by taking a closer look at dog bite injuries. Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States seeks medical attention for a dog bite-related injury, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). From 1979 to 1998, ... continue reading
    VitalWorks’ Wisdom/32 is Windows-based software that can help you manage billing and coding concerns.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    4,074 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Caring for your patients is a full-time job unto itself. Dealing with managed care and the business end of your practice is another full-time job. Indeed, claims processing and billing issues can be overwhelming at times. However, there are office management systems and software that can help you and your staff stay organized and efficient. One out of every three podiatrists uses the Wisdom/32 Podiatry Practice Management System, according to VitalWorks, the manufacturer of the software program. It says the Windows-based software offers a variety of helpful options. Not only can it help w... continue reading
    By Robert A. Warriner, III, MD, and Caroline E. Fife, MD
    11,414 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Last month, Medicare began reimbursing for hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment as an adjunctive therapy for diabetic foot ulcers. After an exhaustive review of the literature, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) concluded that “HBO therapy is clinically effective and, thus, reasonable and necessary in the treatment of certain patients with limb-threatening diabetic wounds of the lower extremity.” According to the CMS, patients must meet each of the following three criteria: • the patient has type I or type II diabetes and has a lower extremity wound that is due to diabetes; ... continue reading