Volume 16 - Issue 5 - May 2003

Feature »

Plantar Heel Pain: How To Get Treatment Results

By Kirk M. Herring, DPM, MS | 26445 reads | 0 comments

Heel pain, especially pain associated with the plantar aponeurosis, is one of the most common overuse injuries affecting adults. Approximately 10 percent of runners as well as many other athletes are affected by plantar fasciitis.1 Conservative estimates have suggested more than 2 million Americans annually receive treatment for this condition.1 As common as this injury may be, there is no universally accepted etiology or treatment for this complaint.
In addition to having a strong anatomical grasp of the heel (see “A Guide To Key Anatomical Considerations” below), i



Feature »

Key Insights On Mastering Pedal Warts

By Gary L. Dockery, DPM | 48263 reads | 0 comments

It is generally thought that about 50 percent of all warts will spontaneously resolve within six months. However, some warts may remain at the same location with no apparent change for many years and others will continue to spread, expand or enlarge with time. Warts are generally self-limiting and very harmless but may cause symptoms due to the fact that they are unsightly, cause embarrassment, impede function, become irritated or cause pain.
Verrucae are commonly termed warts. These are benign intraepidermal neoplasms caused by a variety of different viruses. Papillomaviruses belong to the f



Continuing Education »

Key Pearls Of Calcaneal Osteotomies

By Kieran T. Mahan, DPM | 38472 reads | 0 comments

Calcaneal osteotomies have been a mainstay of foot and ankle surgery for many years, and are critical in the realignment of significant foot deformities. Both varus and valgus deformities often require calcaneal deformities for correct alignment. Although a large number of calcaneal osteotomies have been described in the literature over the years, there are a few principal ones that tend to be more commonly used than others.
One would perform the Dwyer osteotomy for frontal plane deformity of varus in the cavus foot. Surgeons often perform the Evans osteotomy for realignment of the adolesc



Feature »

Looking For Answers On The Malpractice Crisis

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 6513 reads | 0 comments

The scene has been played out at varying degrees throughout the country. Doctors are walking out of hospitals, practitioners are struggling to pay malpractice insurance premiums and juries are awarding millions of dollars to patients who have sued for malpractice. Many perceive a malpractice crisis is affecting the entire healthcare field and DPMs are among those who may feel the crunch.
Across the United States, doctors of several disciplines have found themselves unable to practice due to malpractice costs, leaving patients unable to access healthcare. Last year, the University of Nevada M



Feature »

How To Treat Bite Injuries

By Tamara D. Fishman, DPM | 15014 reads | 0 comments

As the warmer months emerge, people are more likely to tackle spring cleaning of cluttered areas, go outside without shoes and socks, and head to the beach for fun in the sun. Unfortunately, there is also an increased risk of lower-extremity bite injuries with these scenarios, whether the injuries are from dogs, insects, spiders or stingrays.
Let’s start out by taking a closer look at dog bite injuries. Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States seeks medical attention for a dog bite-related injury, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). From 1979 to 1998,



Diabetes Watch »

What You Should Know About Using HBO In Diabetic Wounds

By Robert A. Warriner, III, MD, and Caroline E. Fife, MD | 11031 reads | 0 comments

Last month, Medicare began reimbursing for hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment as an adjunctive therapy for diabetic foot ulcers. After an exhaustive review of the literature, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) concluded that “HBO therapy is clinically effective and, thus, reasonable and necessary in the treatment of certain patients with limb-threatening diabetic wounds of the lower extremity.”
According to the CMS, patients must meet each of the following three criteria:
• the patient has type I or type II diabetes and has a lower extremity wound that is due to diabetes;



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