Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • May 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 5
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    7,684 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    The scene has been played out at varying degrees throughout the country. Doctors are walking out of hospitals, practitioners are struggling to pay malpractice insurance premiums and juries are awarding millions of dollars to patients who have sued for malpractice. Many perceive a malpractice crisis is affecting the entire healthcare field and DPMs are among those who may feel the crunch. Across the United States, doctors of several disciplines have found themselves unable to practice due to malpractice costs, leaving patients unable to access healthcare. Last year, the University of Nevada M ... continue reading
    By Harold Schoenhaus, DPM, Jodi Schoenhaus, DPM, and Dawn Pfeiffer, DPM
    5,106 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    One of the most commonly performed procedures in the foot is an implant arthroplasty of the first metatarsophalangeal (MPJ) joint. However, we have occasionally noted a hollow medullary canal after resecting the base of the proximal phalanx. This can cause problems with incorporation of the implant. Yet there is an intraoperative option one can use to address this problem. Adequate bone stock of the proximal phalanx is crucial for proper seating of the hemi-implant. In some cases, we have found the cancellous bone to be cystic with liquefied fat. However, there has been no evidence of cortica ... continue reading
    By Tamara D. Fishman, DPM
    16,210 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    As the warmer months emerge, people are more likely to tackle spring cleaning of cluttered areas, go outside without shoes and socks, and head to the beach for fun in the sun. Unfortunately, there is also an increased risk of lower-extremity bite injuries with these scenarios, whether the injuries are from dogs, insects, spiders or stingrays. Let’s start out by taking a closer look at dog bite injuries. Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States seeks medical attention for a dog bite-related injury, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). From 1979 to 1998, ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    4,441 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    Caring for your patients is a full-time job unto itself. Dealing with managed care and the business end of your practice is another full-time job. Indeed, claims processing and billing issues can be overwhelming at times. However, there are office management systems and software that can help you and your staff stay organized and efficient. One out of every three podiatrists uses the Wisdom/32 Podiatry Practice Management System, according to VitalWorks, the manufacturer of the software program. It says the Windows-based software offers a variety of helpful options. Not only can it help w ... continue reading
    By Robert A. Warriner, III, MD, and Caroline E. Fife, MD
    12,390 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    Last month, Medicare began reimbursing for hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment as an adjunctive therapy for diabetic foot ulcers. After an exhaustive review of the literature, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) concluded that “HBO therapy is clinically effective and, thus, reasonable and necessary in the treatment of certain patients with limb-threatening diabetic wounds of the lower extremity.” According to the CMS, patients must meet each of the following three criteria: • the patient has type I or type II diabetes and has a lower extremity wound that is due to diabetes; ... continue reading
    By Kirk M. Herring, DPM, MS
    31,735 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    Heel pain, especially pain associated with the plantar aponeurosis, is one of the most common overuse injuries affecting adults. Approximately 10 percent of runners as well as many other athletes are affected by plantar fasciitis.1 Conservative estimates have suggested more than 2 million Americans annually receive treatment for this condition.1 As common as this injury may be, there is no universally accepted etiology or treatment for this complaint. In addition to having a strong anatomical grasp of the heel (see “A Guide To Key Anatomical Considerations” below), i ... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    11,290 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    There is a great deal of satisfaction when our diabetic foot care team gets referrals for patients who were previously seen by doctors from surrounding regions and other nations. However, there is also a great deal of difficulty with poorly or improperly managed cases. In this diagnostic dilemma, I’d like to focus on one patient who was sent to us after one year of care by several doctors. The patient in question is a 70-year-old male, who was previously seen by two podiatrists and an orthopedist. His initial complaint was a small blister plantar to the first metatarsal head of his left f ... continue reading
    By Gary L. Dockery, DPM
    54,972 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    It is generally thought that about 50 percent of all warts will spontaneously resolve within six months. However, some warts may remain at the same location with no apparent change for many years and others will continue to spread, expand or enlarge with time. Warts are generally self-limiting and very harmless but may cause symptoms due to the fact that they are unsightly, cause embarrassment, impede function, become irritated or cause pain. Verrucae are commonly termed warts. These are benign intraepidermal neoplasms caused by a variety of different viruses. Papillomaviruses belong to the f ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    1,964 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    Would I want justice if I underwent an amputation procedure that was later deemed to be unnecessary? You bet. Do I think this kind of clinical situation happens on a routine basis? Hardly. However, you wouldn’t know it by the seemingly skyrocketing malpractice insurance premiums being reported across the country. Escalating jury verdicts seem to play a big role. A July 2002 report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) noted there was a 76 percent increase in the average jury malpractice award from 1996 to 1999. You have to wonder how many verdicts are being fueled m ... continue reading
    By Kieran T. Mahan, DPM
    46,267 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/03
    Calcaneal osteotomies have been a mainstay of foot and ankle surgery for many years, and are critical in the realignment of significant foot deformities. Both varus and valgus deformities often require calcaneal deformities for correct alignment. Although a large number of calcaneal osteotomies have been described in the literature over the years, there are a few principal ones that tend to be more commonly used than others. One would perform the Dwyer osteotomy for frontal plane deformity of varus in the cavus foot. Surgeons often perform the Evans osteotomy for realignment of the adolesc ... continue reading