Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
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  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • April 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 4
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    4,857 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/03
    Is it time for a national scope of practice in podiatry? Individual state laws prevail for now, but disparities between them raise eyebrows, not to mention the legal challenges. Are politics getting in the way of DPMs being able to provide complete podiatric care for patients or is the lack of universal training a far greater obstacle? Let’s get to the wish list first. Some advocate broad parameters of what constitutes lower extremity care for a national scope of practice. One podiatrist says it should be the widest currently defined state law that encompasses care in the lower extremity ... continue reading
    By Mark Caselli, DPM
    52,534 reads | 1 comments | 04/03/03
    The performance demands of ballet are comparable to many highly competitive athletic pursuits. Although dancers are artists and not athletes, the athletic demands of dance choreography place the dancer at risk for injuries. Fifteen to 20 percent of dance injuries involve the foot. Chronic injuries tend to predominate as they are related primarily to the repetitive impact loading of the dancer’s foot on a relatively hard, unyielding surface: the dance floor. Unlike the athlete, who often wears a shoe specially designed to stabilize the foot and absorb shock, the ballet dancer wears only a t ... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    3,331 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/03
    I was pleased to learn the Council on Podiatric Medical Education (CPME) has declared a moratorium on one-year podiatric residency training programs that will take effect in 2008. Twelve months is simply not enough time to prepare young DPMs for the complexity and demands of our profession. I should know. I was a “12-month wonder.” The residency training in podiatry has come 180 degrees since I graduated from podiatry school in 1974. At that time, the top students competed for the few good training programs. In 2003, it’s the opposite. Good residency programs are competing for the top s ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    50,284 reads | 2 comments | 04/03/03
    Peripheral neuropathy is prevalent among people with diabetes and has a strong correlation to the majority of diabetic foot ulcers and diabetes-related amputations. One potential option for helping these patients is Anodyne Therapy, a non-invasive treatment that has garnered praise in clinical studies and anecdotal kudos from podiatrists and their patients. The device, which received FDA approval in 1994, reduces pain and increases circulation, according to the company Anodyne Therapy. How does it work? The Anodyne Therapy System uses monochromatic infrared energy (MIRE) to release nitric ox ... continue reading