Volume 16 - Issue 4 - April 2003

Point-Counterpoint »

Are Ankle Implants Worth Another Look?

By Mark H. Feldman, MS, DPM, and John Grady, DPM | 12609 reads | 0 comments

Yes, Mark H. Feldman, MS, DPM, cites technical advances in the devices and promising results from studies.

Diligent study of normal ankle biomechanics and review of previous implant failures has led to the development of a new generation of total ankle replacement (TAR) implants. The newer implants provide a better means of dissipating the rotational forces at the joint surface by using a meniscus-like bearing between the tibial and talar components, while maintaining the integrity and stability of the joint.1-4
This improvement, coupled with improved cementless fixation, has



Practice Builders »

MCO Applications: Nine Common Mistakes You Should Avoid

By Michael Metzger, DPM, MBA | 5183 reads | 0 comments

More often than not, we feel like we’re doing the managed care company a favor by applying. There’s also a tendency to believe the process is so cut and dry that we can apply at the last minute. Let’s clear up these misconceptions. If you don’t apply and apply properly, someone else will. Secondly, as our mothers use to tell us, haste makes waste. Indeed, simple mistakes can slow the process down to a snail’s pace and/or cause the company to reject your application.
First, I strongly recommend filling out the application yourself. Often, the application will ask for information that



Sports Medicine »

How To Identify And Treat Common Ballet Injuries

By Mark Caselli, DPM | 44105 reads | 1 comments

The performance demands of ballet are comparable to many highly competitive athletic pursuits. Although dancers are artists and not athletes, the athletic demands of dance choreography place the dancer at risk for injuries. Fifteen to 20 percent of dance injuries involve the foot. Chronic injuries tend to predominate as they are related primarily to the repetitive impact loading of the dancer’s foot on a relatively hard, unyielding surface: the dance floor.
Unlike the athlete, who often wears a shoe specially designed to stabilize the foot and absorb shock, the ballet dancer wears only a t



Technology In Practice »

Is Anodyne Therapy The Answer For Peripheral Neuropathy?

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 45064 reads | 2 comments

Peripheral neuropathy is prevalent among people with diabetes and has a strong correlation to the majority of diabetic foot ulcers and diabetes-related amputations. One potential option for helping these patients is Anodyne Therapy, a non-invasive treatment that has garnered praise in clinical studies and anecdotal kudos from podiatrists and their patients.
The device, which received FDA approval in 1994, reduces pain and increases circulation, according to the company Anodyne Therapy. How does it work? The Anodyne Therapy System uses monochromatic infrared energy (MIRE) to release nitric ox



Continuing Education »

Understanding The Impact Of Gait Analysis

By David Levine, DPM, CPed | 8887 reads | 0 comments

There is a large untapped population of patients who need our biomechanical expertise and guidance. These are the patients who are currently seeing physical therapists, chiropractors, orthopedic surgeons and their family physicians for ongoing aches and pains that are sometimes in their feet, but often in other locations too. These are patients looking for answers to their foot, leg, knee, hip and back pain.
Even though we do not directly treat ailments affecting other regions, we do understand the impact the foot has on the rest of the body. Certainly a static exam is an integral part of



Feature »

Essential Treatment Tips For Flexible Flatfoot

By Richard O. Lundeen, DPM, and Stephen M. Offutt, DPM, MS | 17929 reads | 0 comments

The treatment of symptomatic flexible pes planovalgus is a topic that stirs up considerable controversy among practitioners. This is especially true in the pediatric arena where there is a common belief that the child will “grow out of it.” For many foot specialists who see the damaging effects of excessive pronation among adults, the realization is all too obvious that much of this pathology can be curbed if it is addressed in childhood. Shockingly, some even deny the existence of the condition.
Etiological factors of flexible pes planovalgus fall into two broad categories: pediatric an