Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • April 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 4
    By Eric M. Feit, DPM, and Mary M. Peters, DPM
    12,139 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/03
    It is believed that 15 percent of diabetics will develop a foot or leg ulceration at some point during the course of their disease and that 50 percent will recur within 18 months.1 Approximately 80 percent of diabetic ulcers occur plantarly due to abnormal pressures. Most of these ulcers can be treated with sharp debridement, offloading devices and local wound care.2-4 Once you’ve achieved ulcer healing, utilizing custom orthotics with extra depth shoes will often prevent recurrence and reduce the needed frequency of pre-ulcerative keratoma debridements. Unfortunately ... continue reading
    By David Levine, DPM, CPed
    9,456 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/03
    There is a large untapped population of patients who need our biomechanical expertise and guidance. These are the patients who are currently seeing physical therapists, chiropractors, orthopedic surgeons and their family physicians for ongoing aches and pains that are sometimes in their feet, but often in other locations too. These are patients looking for answers to their foot, leg, knee, hip and back pain. Even though we do not directly treat ailments affecting other regions, we do understand the impact the foot has on the rest of the body. Certainly a static exam is an integral part of ... continue reading

    3,351 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/03
    Your debriding arsenal just became a little fuller with the introduction of two new sizes of popular debriding ointments. New from Healthpoint, Panafil and Accuzyme are now available in 6-gram unit packages. According to the company, the smaller packaging of these ointments provides patients with convenience and is a safe, easy option for first time applications. Healthpoint notes the unit dose will reduce potential waste and is appropriate for situations requiring less therapy. Company: Healthpoint Product: Accuzyme and Panafil Unit Dose For more information, Circle 399 on your read ... continue reading
    By Richard O. Lundeen, DPM, and Stephen M. Offutt, DPM, MS
    18,799 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/03
    The treatment of symptomatic flexible pes planovalgus is a topic that stirs up considerable controversy among practitioners. This is especially true in the pediatric arena where there is a common belief that the child will “grow out of it.” For many foot specialists who see the damaging effects of excessive pronation among adults, the realization is all too obvious that much of this pathology can be curbed if it is addressed in childhood. Shockingly, some even deny the existence of the condition. Etiological factors of flexible pes planovalgus fall into two broad categories: pediatric an ... continue reading
    By Gina DiGironimo, Production Editor
    7,208 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/03
    Beginning this month, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will expand its coverage of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) to include the treatment of diabetic wounds in the lower extremities. According to the CMS, in order to qualify for this coverage, patients must have: type 1 or type 2 diabetes and a lower extremity wound due to diabetes; a wound that is classified as a Wagner grade III or higher; and have failed an adequate course of standard wound therapy. Caroline Fife, MD, says the expanded coverage is a “big step forward.” “It represents an understanding on the par ... continue reading
    By Robert Smith, Contributing Editor
    8,467 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/03
    Hiring an associate can be a time-consuming, involved process—if it is done properly. As with any major professional decision, you must take great care and consideration in order to make the right move at the right time with the right person. Making a rushed or uninformed decision can result in excess costs and wasted time, not to mention the potential damage done to relationships with patients. Do you really need an associate? There are a number of key considerations in determining whether to bring an associate on board. • Do you need more time off? Bringing an associate on board ... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    3,004 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/03
    I was pleased to learn the Council on Podiatric Medical Education (CPME) has declared a moratorium on one-year podiatric residency training programs that will take effect in 2008. Twelve months is simply not enough time to prepare young DPMs for the complexity and demands of our profession. I should know. I was a “12-month wonder.” The residency training in podiatry has come 180 degrees since I graduated from podiatry school in 1974. At that time, the top students competed for the few good training programs. In 2003, it’s the opposite. Good residency programs are competing for the top s ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    47,009 reads | 2 comments | 04/03/03
    Peripheral neuropathy is prevalent among people with diabetes and has a strong correlation to the majority of diabetic foot ulcers and diabetes-related amputations. One potential option for helping these patients is Anodyne Therapy, a non-invasive treatment that has garnered praise in clinical studies and anecdotal kudos from podiatrists and their patients. The device, which received FDA approval in 1994, reduces pain and increases circulation, according to the company Anodyne Therapy. How does it work? The Anodyne Therapy System uses monochromatic infrared energy (MIRE) to release nitric ox ... continue reading
    Guest Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed
    30,740 reads | 1 comments | 04/03/03
    Have you seen your share of patients who have back pain as a result of compensating for gait-related problems? If so, you’re not alone. Some patients may indeed get relief from lower back pain after getting custom orthotics. With this in mind, our expert panelists tackle this important subject. Q: Podiatrists often report that many of their patients experience relief of low back pain after receiving custom orthotics. What is the relationship? ... continue reading
    By Thomas Zgonis, DPM, Gary P. Jolly, DPM and Peter Blume, DPM
    18,345 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/03
    While external fixation will not replace internal fixation in the surgical toolbox, it does offer a number of specific advantages. Using external fixation has become routine for initial reduction and stabilization of comminuted long bone fractures, and is often used in conjunction with a few judiciously placed lag screws. In the presence of compromised soft tissue, external fixation becomes essential. Unlike internal fixation, which becomes a fixed, static construct once you apply it, external fixation can be quite dynamic in certain forms. It is common during postoperative periods to adjust ... continue reading