Volume 16 - Issue 4 - April 2003

Technology In Practice »

Is Anodyne Therapy The Answer For Peripheral Neuropathy?

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 45142 reads | 2 comments

Peripheral neuropathy is prevalent among people with diabetes and has a strong correlation to the majority of diabetic foot ulcers and diabetes-related amputations. One potential option for helping these patients is Anodyne Therapy, a non-invasive treatment that has garnered praise in clinical studies and anecdotal kudos from podiatrists and their patients.
The device, which received FDA approval in 1994, reduces pain and increases circulation, according to the company Anodyne Therapy. How does it work? The Anodyne Therapy System uses monochromatic infrared energy (MIRE) to release nitric ox



Continuing Education »

Understanding The Impact Of Gait Analysis

By David Levine, DPM, CPed | 8907 reads | 0 comments

There is a large untapped population of patients who need our biomechanical expertise and guidance. These are the patients who are currently seeing physical therapists, chiropractors, orthopedic surgeons and their family physicians for ongoing aches and pains that are sometimes in their feet, but often in other locations too. These are patients looking for answers to their foot, leg, knee, hip and back pain.
Even though we do not directly treat ailments affecting other regions, we do understand the impact the foot has on the rest of the body. Certainly a static exam is an integral part of



Feature »

Essential Treatment Tips For Flexible Flatfoot

By Richard O. Lundeen, DPM, and Stephen M. Offutt, DPM, MS | 17976 reads | 0 comments

The treatment of symptomatic flexible pes planovalgus is a topic that stirs up considerable controversy among practitioners. This is especially true in the pediatric arena where there is a common belief that the child will “grow out of it.” For many foot specialists who see the damaging effects of excessive pronation among adults, the realization is all too obvious that much of this pathology can be curbed if it is addressed in childhood. Shockingly, some even deny the existence of the condition.
Etiological factors of flexible pes planovalgus fall into two broad categories: pediatric an



Feature »

How To Hire An Associate

By Robert Smith, Contributing Editor | 7665 reads | 0 comments

Hiring an associate can be a time-consuming, involved process—if it is done properly. As with any major professional decision, you must take great care and consideration in order to make the right move at the right time with the right person. Making a rushed or uninformed decision can result in excess costs and wasted time, not to mention the potential damage done to relationships with patients.
Do you really need an associate? There are a number of key considerations in determining whether to bring an associate on board.
• Do you need more time off? Bringing an associate on board



Feature »

Current Concepts In External Fixation

By Thomas Zgonis, DPM, Gary P. Jolly, DPM and Peter Blume, DPM | 17410 reads | 0 comments

While external fixation will not replace internal fixation in the surgical toolbox, it does offer a number of specific advantages. Using external fixation has become routine for initial reduction and stabilization of comminuted long bone fractures, and is often used in conjunction with a few judiciously placed lag screws. In the presence of compromised soft tissue, external fixation becomes essential.
Unlike internal fixation, which becomes a fixed, static construct once you apply it, external fixation can be quite dynamic in certain forms. It is common during postoperative periods to adjust



Editor's Perspective »

Unlocking The Door To A National Scope Of Practice

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 4372 reads | 0 comments

Is it time for a national scope of practice in podiatry? Individual state laws prevail for now, but disparities between them raise eyebrows, not to mention the legal challenges. Are politics getting in the way of DPMs being able to provide complete podiatric care for patients or is the lack of universal training a far greater obstacle?
Let’s get to the wish list first. Some advocate broad parameters of what constitutes lower extremity care for a national scope of practice. One podiatrist says it should be the widest currently defined state law that encompasses care in the lower extremity



  • « Previous
  •  | Page 1 of 3 | 
  • Next »