Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • April 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 4
    Here is an open wound following a sub-total calcanectomy. Take note of the excellent granular bed, which was facilitated by adjuvant wound care and hyperbaric oxygen therapy.
    By Gina DiGironimo, Production Editor
    7,127 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Beginning this month, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will expand its coverage of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) to include the treatment of diabetic wounds in the lower extremities. According to the CMS, in order to qualify for this coverage, patients must have: type 1 or type 2 diabetes and a lower extremity wound due to diabetes; a wound that is classified as a Wagner grade III or higher; and have failed an adequate course of standard wound therapy. Caroline Fife, MD, says the expanded coverage is a “big step forward.” “It represents an understanding on the par... continue reading
    By Robert Smith, Contributing Editor
    8,169 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Hiring an associate can be a time-consuming, involved process—if it is done properly. As with any major professional decision, you must take great care and consideration in order to make the right move at the right time with the right person. Making a rushed or uninformed decision can result in excess costs and wasted time, not to mention the potential damage done to relationships with patients. Do you really need an associate? There are a number of key considerations in determining whether to bring an associate on board. • Do you need more time off? Bringing an associate on board... continue reading
    Guest Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed
    30,073 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    Have you seen your share of patients who have back pain as a result of compensating for gait-related problems? If so, you’re not alone. Some patients may indeed get relief from lower back pain after getting custom orthotics. With this in mind, our expert panelists tackle this important subject. Q: Podiatrists often report that many of their patients experience relief of low back pain after receiving custom orthotics. What is the relationship? ... continue reading
    You can see a preoperative view of chronic midfoot Charcot neuroarthropathy.
    By Thomas Zgonis, DPM, Gary P. Jolly, DPM and Peter Blume, DPM
    18,175 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    While external fixation will not replace internal fixation in the surgical toolbox, it does offer a number of specific advantages. Using external fixation has become routine for initial reduction and stabilization of comminuted long bone fractures, and is often used in conjunction with a few judiciously placed lag screws. In the presence of compromised soft tissue, external fixation becomes essential. Unlike internal fixation, which becomes a fixed, static construct once you apply it, external fixation can be quite dynamic in certain forms. It is common during postoperative periods to adjust ... continue reading
    By Mark H. Feldman, MS, DPM, and John Grady, DPM
    13,184 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Yes, Mark H. Feldman, MS, DPM, cites technical advances in the devices and promising results from studies. Diligent study of normal ankle biomechanics and review of previous implant failures has led to the development of a new generation of total ankle replacement (TAR) implants. The newer implants provide a better means of dissipating the rotational forces at the joint surface by using a meniscus-like bearing between the tibial and talar components, while maintaining the integrity and stability of the joint.1-4 This improvement, coupled with improved cementless fixation, has... continue reading
    By Michael Metzger, DPM, MBA
    5,503 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    More often than not, we feel like we’re doing the managed care company a favor by applying. There’s also a tendency to believe the process is so cut and dry that we can apply at the last minute. Let’s clear up these misconceptions. If you don’t apply and apply properly, someone else will. Secondly, as our mothers use to tell us, haste makes waste. Indeed, simple mistakes can slow the process down to a snail’s pace and/or cause the company to reject your application. First, I strongly recommend filling out the application yourself. Often, the application will ask for information that... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    4,524 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Is it time for a national scope of practice in podiatry? Individual state laws prevail for now, but disparities between them raise eyebrows, not to mention the legal challenges. Are politics getting in the way of DPMs being able to provide complete podiatric care for patients or is the lack of universal training a far greater obstacle? Let’s get to the wish list first. Some advocate broad parameters of what constitutes lower extremity care for a national scope of practice. One podiatrist says it should be the widest currently defined state law that encompasses care in the lower extremity... continue reading
    By Mark Caselli, DPM
    46,447 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    The performance demands of ballet are comparable to many highly competitive athletic pursuits. Although dancers are artists and not athletes, the athletic demands of dance choreography place the dancer at risk for injuries. Fifteen to 20 percent of dance injuries involve the foot. Chronic injuries tend to predominate as they are related primarily to the repetitive impact loading of the dancer’s foot on a relatively hard, unyielding surface: the dance floor. Unlike the athlete, who often wears a shoe specially designed to stabilize the foot and absorb shock, the ballet dancer wears only a t... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,905 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I was pleased to learn the Council on Podiatric Medical Education (CPME) has declared a moratorium on one-year podiatric residency training programs that will take effect in 2008. Twelve months is simply not enough time to prepare young DPMs for the complexity and demands of our profession. I should know. I was a “12-month wonder.” The residency training in podiatry has come 180 degrees since I graduated from podiatry school in 1974. At that time, the top students competed for the few good training programs. In 2003, it’s the opposite. Good residency programs are competing for the top s... continue reading
    DPMs and clinical studies have praised Anodyne Therapy Systems for treatment of neuropathy.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    46,432 reads | 2 comments | 09/03/08
    Peripheral neuropathy is prevalent among people with diabetes and has a strong correlation to the majority of diabetic foot ulcers and diabetes-related amputations. One potential option for helping these patients is Anodyne Therapy, a non-invasive treatment that has garnered praise in clinical studies and anecdotal kudos from podiatrists and their patients. The device, which received FDA approval in 1994, reduces pain and increases circulation, according to the company Anodyne Therapy. How does it work? The Anodyne Therapy System uses monochromatic infrared energy (MIRE) to release nitric ox... continue reading