Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • March 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 3
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    8,600 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/03
    Plastic and reconstructive surgery techniques can be a significant adjunct for podiatric surgeons in managing diabetic foot wounds and tissue loss. With this in mind, the panelists discuss a variety of techniques (including split-thickness skin grafting and muscle flaps) and indications for chronic ulcers, the neuropathic foot and pressure-induced heel ulcerations. Q: When do you consider reconstructive plastic surgical techniques in the management of diabetic foot ulcers? A: Peter Blume, DPM, says he considers plastic surgery techniques for these ulcers when offloading and conserva ... continue reading
    Guest Clinical Editor: Tamara Fishman, DPM
    5,819 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/03
    A patient’s medical history can provide you with critical information that is necessary to differentiate among the various types of lower extremity ulcerations. Not only are there many different etiologies of lower extremity ulcers, it’s also important to be aware of the patient’s underlying medical conditions as well, as you will see in the following case study. A 38-year-old Caucasian female patient recounted her underlying medical conditions when she came in for evaluation and treatment of her left leg ulceration. She injured the side of her leg while walking and had the ulceration f ... continue reading
    By Richard M. Stillman, MD, FACS Clinical Editor: John Steinberg, DPM
    9,989 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/03
    Managing foot wounds in diabetes patients forms much of the core practice of wound care and podiatry. In the United States, the annual cost for the care of diabetic foot wounds exceeds $5 billion.1 It’s been estimated that anywhere from 2.5 to 10.7 percent of patients with diabetes develop a foot wound each year. Even for wounds that heal, the recurrence rate is approximately 55 percent over the next five years. According to one study, the prevalence of neuropathy in the diabetic population is 33.5 percent, the prevalence of vascular disease is 12.7 percent and the prevalence of ... continue reading