Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • March 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 3
    By Anthony Poggio, DPM
    27,132 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Diabetes is one of the more common conditions that we treat. Our training and expertise in this area make us an integral part of the multidisciplinary team approach. Given that diabetes is a multi-system disorder, diagnosis and treatment tends to be more complicated. Indeed, treating these patients may involve more frequent visits, more detailed examinations and more complex decision making. A significant number of patients in virtually any podiatric practice are diabetic. Given this high volume, errors in billing and coding can have a major financial impact on a practice. Improperly submitt... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    4,774 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    My patient was a 40-something, peroxide blonde, personal fitness trainer. It was her first visit and she complained, “You have to do something about my nails. I can’t have this flaw with my job.” Her nails looked nearly normal with only slight thickening and very faint yellow discoloration. She had a history of liver dysfunction. I explained that her problem wasn’t serious enough to treat and the oral medications for fungus nails were contraindicated because of her health history. At this point, Blondie screamed at me because I had nothing to cure her nails. I sat back and made a few... continue reading
    Jeffrey Page, DPM, says a third of the diabetes patients at his center have been diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy (like the patient shown above) and approximately 15 percent of those patients are symptomatic. (Photo courtesy of Stephen Barrett, DPM)
    Moderator: David G. Armstrong, DPM; Panelists: Andrew Boulton, MD, A. Lee Dellon, MD, Jeffrey Page, DPM and Barry Rosenblum, DPM
    8,616 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Painful diabetic neuropathy is perhaps one of the most discussed and hotly debated subjects in podiatry. Emerging research and emerging treatments have fueled the fire even further. With this in mind, David G. Armstrong, DPM, a member of the American Diabetes Association’s National Board of Directors, posed a number of questions to leading authorities on this controversial subject. Here’s what they had to say … Q: How prevalent is painful diabetic neuropathy in your practice? A: All of the panelists note they see a large number of patients with neuropathy secondary to diabete... continue reading
    Aircast’s Pneumatic Walker Diabetic System has multi-aircell support to provide graduated, pulsating compression.
    By Gina DiGironimo, Production Editor
    3,588 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When diabetic patients have lower extremity injuries, they may have trouble weightbearing and getting around can prove difficult. Not only do you want to promote healing, you also want to enhance patient mobility. You may recommend traditional casting braces or something tailored specifically for your diabetic patient. One such option is the Pneumatic Walker Diabetic System. Aircast, the manufacturer of the device, offers two other walking braces, the Pneumatic Walker and the Foam Walker, which provide pneumatic and semi-pneumatic support respectively. However, the Pneumatic Walker Diabetic S... continue reading
    Here is a close-up view of a paronychia from an ingrown mycotic nail of a patient with diabetes.
    By Richard A. Pollak, DPM, MS
    15,809 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    8,050 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Plastic and reconstructive surgery techniques can be a significant adjunct for podiatric surgeons in managing diabetic foot wounds and tissue loss. With this in mind, the panelists discuss a variety of techniques (including split-thickness skin grafting and muscle flaps) and indications for chronic ulcers, the neuropathic foot and pressure-induced heel ulcerations. Q: When do you consider reconstructive plastic surgical techniques in the management of diabetic foot ulcers? A: Peter Blume, DPM, says he considers plastic surgery techniques for these ulcers when offloading and conserva... continue reading
    By Eric Espensen, DPM, and Minh Mach, MD
    6,643 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The prevalence of diabetes, especially that of type 2 in children, is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide. Although no data currently exists to determine the extent to which type 2 diabetes has emerged among U.S. children and adolescents, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that among new cases of childhood diabetes, the proportion of those with type 2 diabetes ranges between 8 percent and 43 percent.1 ... continue reading
    By Richard M. Stillman, MD, FACS Clinical Editor: John Steinberg, DPM
    9,472 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Managing foot wounds in diabetes patients forms much of the core practice of wound care and podiatry. In the United States, the annual cost for the care of diabetic foot wounds exceeds $5 billion.1 It’s been estimated that anywhere from 2.5 to 10.7 percent of patients with diabetes develop a foot wound each year. Even for wounds that heal, the recurrence rate is approximately 55 percent over the next five years. According to one study, the prevalence of neuropathy in the diabetic population is 33.5 percent, the prevalence of vascular disease is 12.7 percent and the prevalence of... continue reading
    Guest Clinical Editor: Tamara Fishman, DPM
    5,589 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    A patient’s medical history can provide you with critical information that is necessary to differentiate among the various types of lower extremity ulcerations. Not only are there many different etiologies of lower extremity ulcers, it’s also important to be aware of the patient’s underlying medical conditions as well, as you will see in the following case study. A 38-year-old Caucasian female patient recounted her underlying medical conditions when she came in for evaluation and treatment of her left leg ulceration. She injured the side of her leg while walking and had the ulceration f... continue reading
    Do you need some answers to questions you may have in regard to treating diabetic feet? You may consider turning to the resource www.footandankle.com/DMfoot/. The Treatment-Based Diabetic Foot Risk Calculator is run by the University of Texas Health Scien
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    9,536 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recently released its 2003 Clinical Practice Recommendations and one of the highlights is a new methodology of diagnosing diabetes. Using an altered version of a test may change the number of how many people are diagnosed with diabetes, according to the ADA. The ADA recommends practitioners use the following criteria: • Symptoms of diabetes plus casual plasma glucose concentration 200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l); or • FPG >126 mg/dl (7.0 mmol/l); or • 2-h PG > 200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l) during an OGTT. The new criteria change the previous recommendat... continue reading