Volume 14 - Issue 12 - December 2001

Feature »

Clearing Up The Confusion Over Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

By Douglas H. Richie Jr. | 40164 reads | 0 comments

Virtually every foot and ankle surgical symposium held in the United States over the past five years has devoted significant sessions to the pathomechanics, surgical and non-surgical treatment of the symptomatic adult flatfoot condition. Unfortunately, the popular name for this condition, posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD), reinforces a generally accepted notion that a failure of the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) is the primary etiology of the symptomatic adult acquired flatfoot deformity.
However, there has been recent evidence to the contrary that would, at least, caution us about



New Products »

A Sharp Assessment

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Are you trying to get a more accurate handle on a patient’s diabetic neuropathy?
If so, you may want to check out the SmartPen dual filament sensor from Koven Technology. It says the SmartPen combines a sterile sharp tip sensor and a replaceable, calibrated, retractable Semmes-Weinstein monofilament.
According to Koven, the sterile sensor enables you to test for sharp sensations in areas near diabetic foot ulcers. Using the 10gm monofilament helps you assess diabetic neuropathy assessment with touch-pressure sensation and is calibrated for 100 uses, according to the company. Koven adds tha



Continuing Education »

How To Treat Sesamoid Injuries In Athletes

By Eric J. Heit, DPM and Richard T. Bouché, DPM | 10767 reads | 0 comments

It has been speculated that 50 to 75 percent of weightbearing forces are transmitted through the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) complex during weightbearing and these forces can account for up to three times one’s body weight.1,2 Anatomical location of the hallucal sesamoids predisposes them to significant shear, pressure and ground reactive forces during weightbearing activities. As a result, sesamoids are a site for potential injury.
Sesamoid pathology is not uncommon in a typical podiatric sports medicine practice. In a study of 1,000 running injuries, the sesamoids



Feature »

Introduction

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The burden of infections in surgical patients today is alarming. In the United States, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Approximately 70% of nosocomial infections are due to gram-positive organisms, with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) being a very common nosocomial pathogen in hospitalized patients and the most common nosocomial pathogen in surgical patients. Equally alarming is the recent, rapidly rising occurrence of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA), a pathogen that appears to have evolved independently of healthcare-asso



Point-Counterpoint »

Wound Cultures: What Is The Best Test?

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By Jonathan E. Moore, DPM, MS

When it comes to microbiologic monitoring of a wound, qualitative and quantitative cultures are the most commonly used techniques. In the outpatient wound care environment, you would generally obtain qualitative cultures As we all know, the swab method is easy, inexpensive and is a non-invasive method that gives you specific information about bacterial contamination in the superficial wound. In addition to the class and type of bacterial organism grown from this qualitative culture, the degree of contamination has been reported as very light, light, moderate a



Feature »

Mastering The Top Five Reimbursement Challenges

Harry Goldsmith, DPM | 6524 reads | 0 comments

Getting paid promptly and properly is never easy. However, this renowned expert offers insights that can help you improve office efficiency, navigate through the red tape of managed care and ultimately bolster incoming revenue streams.

Way back when, in pre-managed care times, physicians could expect to be paid their fees in full. Unfortunately, with the advent of the managed care era, times have changed and certainly not for the better for DPMs. Physicians, who had previously maintained an “arm’s distance” from third party payers (preferring to deal directly with their patients), ha



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