Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • December 2001 | Volume 14 - Issue 12
    According to the author, recent evidence suggests that DPMS should be wary of assuming that a ruptured PTT is the primary etiology for adult-acquired flatfooot (shown above).
    By Douglas H. Richie Jr.
    41,981 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Virtually every foot and ankle surgical symposium held in the United States over the past five years has devoted significant sessions to the pathomechanics, surgical and non-surgical treatment of the symptomatic adult flatfoot condition. Unfortunately, the popular name for this condition, posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD), reinforces a generally accepted notion that a failure of the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) is the primary etiology of the symptomatic adult acquired flatfoot deformity. However, there has been recent evidence to the contrary that would, at least, caution us about ... continue reading
    The Apex Foot Measuring System from Apex Foot Health Industries allows you to compare heel-to-toe and heel-to-ball length in order to determine the correct shoe size. The system is available in men’s, women’s and a combination version.

    3,295 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Are you trying to get a more accurate handle on a patient’s diabetic neuropathy? If so, you may want to check out the SmartPen dual filament sensor from Koven Technology. It says the SmartPen combines a sterile sharp tip sensor and a replaceable, calibrated, retractable Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. According to Koven, the sterile sensor enables you to test for sharp sensations in areas near diabetic foot ulcers. Using the 10gm monofilament helps you assess diabetic neuropathy assessment with touch-pressure sensation and is calibrated for 100 uses, according to the company. Koven adds tha... continue reading
    This positive bone scan indicates bilateral tibial stress fractures with associated right first metatarsophalangeal joint arthritis.
    By Eric J. Heit, DPM and Richard T. Bouché, DPM
    11,198 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    It has been speculated that 50 to 75 percent of weightbearing forces are transmitted through the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) complex during weightbearing and these forces can account for up to three times one’s body weight.1,2 Anatomical location of the hallucal sesamoids predisposes them to significant shear, pressure and ground reactive forces during weightbearing activities. As a result, sesamoids are a site for potential injury. Sesamoid pathology is not uncommon in a typical podiatric sports medicine practice. In a study of 1,000 running injuries, the sesamoids... continue reading

    1,496 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The burden of infections in surgical patients today is alarming. In the United States, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Approximately 70% of nosocomial infections are due to gram-positive organisms, with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) being a very common nosocomial pathogen in hospitalized patients and the most common nosocomial pathogen in surgical patients. Equally alarming is the recent, rapidly rising occurrence of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA), a pathogen that appears to have evolved independently of healthcare-asso... continue reading
    Harry Goldsmith, DPM
    6,763 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Getting paid promptly and properly is never easy. However, this renowned expert offers insights that can help you improve office efficiency, navigate through the red tape of managed care and ultimately bolster incoming revenue streams. Way back when, in pre-managed care times, physicians could expect to be paid their fees in full. Unfortunately, with the advent of the managed care era, times have changed and certainly not for the better for DPMs. Physicians, who had previously maintained an “arm’s distance” from third party payers (preferring to deal directly with their patients), ha ... continue reading

    1,222 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    John McCord, DPM
    1,746 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    A new form of bragging rites exists among physicians. There seems to be competition among doctors where the winner is who who paid the least for his car. I have been the clear winner in my medical community. During the past year, I have been driving a 1967 Mercedes diesel that cost me $1,400. It doesn’t look like much but it makes a statement. It says I’m frugal and not afraid of risk. While I always carry a tool box, a cell phone and a case of oil, the old Benz has been a reliable means of transport to and from the office. There was an unfortunate incident last spring when the drive shaf... continue reading

    1,071 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    David C. Erfle, DPM and Nicholas Romansky, DPM
    11,275 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    These authors offer diagnostic tips and treatment pearls for lower-extremity tendon injuries, with a specific focus on managing chronic tenosynovitis. Tendon pathology in the foot and ankle are the most common of all injuries. Obviously, there have been chapters in books dedicated solely to repairing individual tendons in the lower extremity. Given the array of external factors (i.e., duration and intensity of activity, improper shoes) and intrinsic factors (i.e., altered body mechanics, advanced age) that can cause tendon pathology, let’s take a closer look at how to differentiate tendon... continue reading
    Jeff Hall
    1,612 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Life moves so fast that few people have time to consider “what if” scenarios, even if these scenarios could have a serious impact on their lives and the lives of others. However, all of this changed on September 11. During this time of grieving, loss and fear, our lives came to an abrupt halt as we were forced to deal with the possibility of an uncertain tomorrow. For many of us who didn’t experience direct personal losses, it was a time to reflect on our lives. It was also a time for professionals from all different fields to ask themselves troubling “what if” questions. For exampl... continue reading