Volume 14 - Issue 12 - December 2001

Feature »

Clearing Up The Confusion Over Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

By Douglas H. Richie Jr. | 40127 reads | 0 comments

Virtually every foot and ankle surgical symposium held in the United States over the past five years has devoted significant sessions to the pathomechanics, surgical and non-surgical treatment of the symptomatic adult flatfoot condition. Unfortunately, the popular name for this condition, posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD), reinforces a generally accepted notion that a failure of the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) is the primary etiology of the symptomatic adult acquired flatfoot deformity.
However, there has been recent evidence to the contrary that would, at least, caution us about



New Products »

A Sharp Assessment

3196 reads | 0 comments

Are you trying to get a more accurate handle on a patient’s diabetic neuropathy?
If so, you may want to check out the SmartPen dual filament sensor from Koven Technology. It says the SmartPen combines a sterile sharp tip sensor and a replaceable, calibrated, retractable Semmes-Weinstein monofilament.
According to Koven, the sterile sensor enables you to test for sharp sensations in areas near diabetic foot ulcers. Using the 10gm monofilament helps you assess diabetic neuropathy assessment with touch-pressure sensation and is calibrated for 100 uses, according to the company. Koven adds tha



Continuing Education »

How To Treat Sesamoid Injuries In Athletes

By Eric J. Heit, DPM and Richard T. Bouché, DPM | 10759 reads | 0 comments

It has been speculated that 50 to 75 percent of weightbearing forces are transmitted through the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) complex during weightbearing and these forces can account for up to three times one’s body weight.1,2 Anatomical location of the hallucal sesamoids predisposes them to significant shear, pressure and ground reactive forces during weightbearing activities. As a result, sesamoids are a site for potential injury.
Sesamoid pathology is not uncommon in a typical podiatric sports medicine practice. In a study of 1,000 running injuries, the sesamoids



Feature »

Introduction

1452 reads | 0 comments

The burden of infections in surgical patients today is alarming. In the United States, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Approximately 70% of nosocomial infections are due to gram-positive organisms, with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) being a very common nosocomial pathogen in hospitalized patients and the most common nosocomial pathogen in surgical patients. Equally alarming is the recent, rapidly rising occurrence of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA), a pathogen that appears to have evolved independently of healthcare-asso



Orthotics Q&A »

Charcot Arthropathy: When Mechanical Treatment Can Help

7432 reads | 0 comments

Charcot arthropathy is an extremely challenging disease process to treat for many reasons, according to David Levine, DPM, CPed. He says one of the big problems is not being able to rely upon the patient for feedback. Given the profound peripheral sensory neuropathy present in these patients, Dr. Levine says vigilant monitoring of any changes in the foot is essential for preventing further complications.
With this in mind, our expert panelists take a closer look at mechanical management of Charcot arthropathy and when it can help facilitate successful treatment outcomes.
Q: In your opinio



Sports Medicine »

What Are The Best Orthotics For Plantar Fasciitis

Mark A. Caselli, DPM and Ellen Sobel, DPM, PhD | 252106 reads | 5 comments

The irritation is the result of biomechanical deformities such as limb length discrepancy, gastrocsoleus equinus, and excessive foot or leg varus, producing midtarsal and subtalar hyperpronation. In turn, this pronation produces a stretch of the plantar fascia as well as unwanted pulling on the origin of the fascia (the medial calcaneal tubercle).



  • « Previous
  •  | Page 1 of 3 | 
  • Next »