Volume 16 - Issue 1 - January 2003

News and Trends »

How Effective Is Honey In Treating Resistant Wounds?

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 4588 reads | 0 comments

Can the ancient remedy of honey make an impact in treating wounds that are resistant to traditional antibiotics? Two articles, published recently in Ostomy Wound Management and in the Journal of Applied Microbiology, suggest honey may show some promise in wound healing.
The Journal of Applied Microbiology study involved 18 strains of MRSA and seven strains of vancomycin-sensitive enterococci (VSE), which were isolated from infected wounds. Researchers established their sensitivity to two natural honeys of median levels of antibacterial activity and compared that with an



Surgical Pearls »

A New Approach For Correcting Hammertoe Deformities

By Gerald W. Paul, DPM | 13342 reads | 0 comments

The advantages of lesser proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis in hammertoe surgery are numerous and well known. Arthrodesis is indicated in patients who have compromised intrinsic muscle function and are lacking both digital and metatarsophalangeal joint stability. Indeed, digital arthrodesis has always been an excellent procedure to consider if you fear reoccurrence of the hammertoe deformity due to biomechanical factors.
Through the years, surgeons have employed several methods and devices to facilitate fusion across the lesser proximal interphalangeal joints (PIPJ) for stable hammer



Technology In Practice »

Why The PressureStat Is A Diagnostic Educator

By Gina DiGironimo, Production Editor | 4719 reads | 0 comments

Proper diagnosis and treatment of foot ulcerations is essential to preventing lower extremity amputations. With this in mind, Footlogic offers its PressureStat device. An alternative to the traditional optical pedobarograph, the PressureStat gives you a quick and effective way to identify plantar pressure abnormalities associated with diabetes. A 1999 study in Diabetic Medicine showed that the PressureStat performed well in correctly identifying all high pressure areas in patients versus other pressure data techniques in assessing and preventing diabetic foot ulcers.1
Andre



Wound Care Q&A »

Expert Insights On New Advances In Wound Care

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 5780 reads | 0 comments

As Aristidis Veves, MD and Thanh Dinh, DPM, point out, it is well-known that the chronic diabetic foot ulcer is stuck in the inflammation phase of the wound healing cycle. Research studies have shown that non-healing wounds may have specific biochemical imbalances, notes Liza Ovington, PhD. In particular, non-healing wounds have been shown to have excessively high levels of proteolytic enzymes such as matrix metalloproteases (MMPs).
While these enzymes are necessary in various aspects of the healing process, such as cellular migration, debridement and phagocytosis, Dr. Ovington notes that hi



Feature »

Mastering The Scarf Bunionectomy

By Lowell Scott Weil Jr., DPM | 45523 reads | 0 comments

While the great majority of hallux valgus deformities can be accommodated with a wide toe-box shoe, secondary deformities, such as painful hammer digit syndrome and metatarsalgia, coupled with patient demands, often drive the need for operative intervention. In addition, some individuals are averse to wearing any type of special shoes and wish to have the deformity corrected rather than accommodated.
When an operation is indicated in your opinion and in concert with the patient’s wishes, the goals for the ideal hallux valgus operation are as follows:
• joint congruity with full, pain-fre



Continuing Education »

Understanding The Link Between Nutrition And Wound Healing

By John E. Hahn, DPM, ND | 14335 reads | 0 comments

In our profession, we do not receive extensive training in medical nutrition and its link to wound healing and the prevention of infections. Most podiatric and medical school curriculums devote only a limited amount of time to nutritional instruction for their students. Granted, podiatrists are aware of the nutritional requirements for the diabetic patients. Preoperatively, we usually work alongside an internist or primary care physician to help these patients balance their insulin and glucose levels during and after the foot surgeries.