Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • December 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 12
    By John McCord, DPM
    2,087 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/02
    I have a love-hate relationship with motorcycles. I was called to the emergency room last week to treat a man who was hit by a car while riding his touring bike. I examined him and reviewed his X-rays. He had displaced fractures of three metatarsals and the cuboid of his right foot. We talked about motorcycles for a few minutes and then I explained the nature of his foot injuries and what had to be done to repair the fractures. My interest in motorcycles gave me credibility even in his Fentanyl-induced haze. I developed a passion for motorcycles as a young boy. I hung around a Harley-Davidso ... continue reading
    By Michael S. Downey, DPM
    12,899 reads | 1 comments | 12/03/02
    The current use of callus distraction techniques in foot, ankle and lower leg surgery is constantly growing. The limits of callus distraction techniques appear to be those imposed by surgical access and fixation. As techniques and technology continue to improve, even more indications for callus distraction will evolve. Callus distraction, also commonly referred to as distraction osteogenesis or callostasis, is the lengthening of a bone by manipulation of the bone callus during the healing process. Gavriel A. Ilizarov, a Russian-born physician, is credited with popularizing limb lengtheni ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    7,130 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/02
    In the wake of increasing threats of resistant bacteria strains such as MRSA, new data presented at the 40th Annual Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America provides some hope. Researchers revealed that linezolid may have promise in treating diabetic foot infections caused by bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. According to the results of the study, which involved over 350 patients at U.S. and European sites, 81.3 percent of the linezolid patients were “clinically cured,” compared to 71.3 percent of patients who received a standard aminopenicillin combination. Be ... continue reading
    By Guy R. Pupp, DPM, David T. Savage, DPM, MS, and Mark B. Hellmann, DPM, MS
    22,078 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/02
    Neuropathic osteoarthropathy is a debilitating condition that affects diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. This distinct pathologic entity, commonly known as Charcot’s arthropathy or Charcot’s joint disease, is characterized by pathologic fractures, joint dislocation and deformity, resulting in a foot at high risk for ulceration and amputation in severe cases. Armstrong, et. al., found the prevalence of Charcot’s arthropathy ranges between 0.16 percent in the general diabetic population of patients to 13 percent of patients presenting to a high-risk diabetic foot clinic.1< ... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM, and Edward C. Rzonca, DPM
    208,233 reads | 2 comments | 12/03/02
    Chronic overuse problems that persist despite appropriate care are the hallmarks of a leg length discrepancy (LLD) in an athlete. While the symptoms associated with LLDs are diverse and, at times, vague and confusing, you should suspect limb length asymmetry when athletes have back or lower extremity complaints. Leg length asymmetries appear to be the third most common cause of running injuries and occur in 60 to 90 percent of the population. In regard to classifying LLD, the two major categories are structural and functional. The one minor category is environmental. ... continue reading
    By Michael M. Cohen, DPM
    43,053 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/02
    Certainly, one of the greatest challenges practitioners face is properly evaluating exercise-induced leg pain. All too commonly pigeonholed under the term shin splints, chronic (or exertional) compartment syndrome (ECS) is a unique disorder whose term specifies its clinical and pathological features. Those who treat the condition recognize the list of differentials can be exhausting and an accurate diagnosis is essential to providing proper treatment. Compartment syndromes are either acute or chronic. The acute form first described by Volkman in 1881, is irreversible and may be initiated by ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    11,007 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/02
    Podiatrists are adding the OsteoSet Resorbable Mini-Bead Kit to their arsenal of treatments for osteomyelitis and diabetic foot infections. One prospective study reports that bone repair with the OsteoSet yielded a 98 percent success at 12 months for contained defects, according to the product’s manufacturer Wright Medical.1 For defects specifically caused by osteomyelitis, a different retrospective study reports a 64 percent healing rate.2 Those who have used the product in their practice have also seen favorable results. In the past year, Ritchard Rosen, DPM, says he ... continue reading
    By Robert Smith, Contributing Editor
    3,889 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/02
    Upgrading your office technology can give you a host of ailments, both real and imagined. First, there’s the headache associated with researching and selecting a system that’s right for your practice. Then there’s the whiplash that occurs at the thought of keeping up with the daunting pace of that technology—its configuration and interminable upgrades. Lastly, there’s the churning of the stomach that happens once everything is in place, as you mull over whether you made the right decision. Of course, the decision to embrace practice management technology is one that you must make at ... continue reading
    By Dana Giacalone, DPM, and Khurram Khan, DPM
    14,248 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/02
    When it comes to peripheral vascular disease, you can use many modalities to detect and evaluate this disease. Arteriography is the gold standard and provides excellent anatomic detail, but it is invasive and requires ionizing radiation and administration of contrast. It also provides very limited physiologic or functional information. Indeed, it’s important to be aware of the role of noninvasive testing measures (see “When NIV Studies Are Warranted”). After all, Pellerito, et. al., pointed out it’s advantageous to use noninvasive vascular (NIV) evaluation prior to angiography in ord ... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Howard Dananberg, DPM
    23,771 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/02
    As December arrives, patients who enjoy winter sports begin to think about skiing. Ski boot technology has come a long way in recent years, with many comfort features added to complement the performance the boots are designed to provide. Patients will often ask your opinion as to what they need and how they can enhance their skiing. With this in mind, our expert panelists offer their opinions. Q: What are the most interesting advances now available in ski boots for the upcoming season? A: In the past five years, ski boots have moved in a few directions, according to Ben Wax, CPe ... continue reading