Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • November 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 11
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    10,035 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    A patient comes into the office with pain in the posterior aspect of her ankle. She doesn’t recall injuring the leg, but notes she has had the pain for over six months and that it is present at all times. An active dancer with the local ballet company, the patient adds that she experiences chronic pain when doing any form of dancing. She says the pain is far worse with high heels and ballet shoes en-pointe, but finds it more tolerable when wearing stable flat shoes. The pain is deeper than the superficial Achilles tendon region and does not radiate to any region. An examination of the pat ... continue reading
    By Robert J. Snyder, DPM, CWS, and Heather Perrigo, RN
    29,055 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    Pressure ulcer disease represents a significant medical problem both nationally and internationally. Approximately 1.7 million people in the United States develop these maladies at an annual cost of between $2.2 billion and $3.6 billion.1 With the population aging, assisted living and nursing facilities flourishing and obesity creating catastrophic increases in diabetes and other diseases, it is likely the number of ulcerations will continue to increase. The pressure ulcer is an area of localized damage to the skin and underlying tissue caused by pressure, sheer, friction and/or a ... continue reading

    2,955 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    In regard to the article “Restoring Sensation In Diabetic Patients” (see pg. 38, September issue) and the editorial (see “PSSD: Assessing Its Value And Potential,” pg. 12, September issue), we have been using the Pressure Specified Sensory Device (PSSD) at the University of Texas since March of 2001. We have been pleasantly surprised with the results of the testing. It has been beneficial in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients with nerve symptoms. The strength of the device is it allows you to look critically at the severity of nerve damage and allows earlier, more sensitive de ... continue reading
    By David Levine, DPM, CPed
    7,416 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    Some days, it seems to be an epidemic. As you read the patient information sheet prior to entering the examination room to meet a patient for the first time, you start to wonder if everyone will eventually wind up with heel pain at some point in their lives. Sometimes it is easy to see why a person might be suffering with heel pain. Obesity, poor shoe selection and a job that requires extensive standing or walking are obvious contributing factors. In other situations, the cause(s) might be more perplexing. For instance, when a patient who has already received orthotic devices or even one who ... continue reading