Volume 15 - Issue 11 - November 2002

Forum »

Learning To Love Orthopods

By John McCord, DPM | 4185 reads | 0 comments

Learning to trust and even like orthopedic surgeons was tough for me. I spent four years in podiatry school being warned that orthopods stay awake at night plotting the demise of podiatry. At the very least, I could expect a clever orthopod would ruin my career the first time I slipped up.
My experience with orthopedic surgeons in my residency training created a greater fear and dislike for the specialty. The gruff and ornery old Dr. Borman was Chief of Orthopedics in the hospital where I trained. He chewed me out in front of a young extern one day because my hair was too long. He told me I c



Editor's Perspective »

Are We Losing The Battle Of The Bulge?

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 2436 reads | 0 comments

The statistics from a recently released government survey are staggering to say the least. Approximately 59 million adults in the United States over the age of 20 are obese. That’s almost a third of the country who are 30 or more pounds above a healthy body weight. According to the American Diabetes Association, the new figures on obesity have doubled from a similar survey done two decades ago.
There’s no doubt about the link between these statistics and the increasing prevalence of Type 2 diabetes. Obviously, obese people are at a greater risk of insulin resistance and glucose intoler



Diagnostic Dilemmas »

Identifying A Dancer's Chronic Ankle Pain

By Babak Baravarian, DPM | 9168 reads | 0 comments

A patient comes into the office with pain in the posterior aspect of her ankle. She doesn’t recall injuring the leg, but notes she has had the pain for over six months and that it is present at all times. An active dancer with the local ballet company, the patient adds that she experiences chronic pain when doing any form of dancing. She says the pain is far worse with high heels and ballet shoes en-pointe, but finds it more tolerable when wearing stable flat shoes.
The pain is deeper than the superficial Achilles tendon region and does not radiate to any region.
An examination of the pat



Letters »

Sharing Insights On The PSSD

2698 reads | 0 comments

In regard to the article “Restoring Sensation In Diabetic Patients” (see pg. 38, September issue) and the editorial (see “PSSD: Assessing Its Value And Potential,” pg. 12, September issue), we have been using the Pressure Specified Sensory Device (PSSD) at the University of Texas since March of 2001. We have been pleasantly surprised with the results of the testing. It has been beneficial in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients with nerve symptoms.

The strength of the device is it allows you to look critically at the severity of nerve damage and allows earlier, more sensitive de



New Products »

Permeates And Penetrates

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Looking for a more durable antifungal medication that can give your patients better penetration?
You may want to consider Loprox Topical Suspension (TS), a new antifungal medication from Medicis. According to Medicis, the cream- based Loprox TS permeates the skin’s cracks and crevices and does not rinse off after vigorous washing and rinsing in warm water.
The company says you can use Loprox TS to treat large or hairy areas of the skin. The new cream is available in 30 and 60 mL sizes.
Company: Medicis
Product: Loprox Topical Suspension
For more information, circle 398 on your reade



News and Trends »

Heel Pain Study: Night Splints In, Stretching Out?

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 9280 reads | 0 comments

While plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain, there’s not exactly a universal approach when it comes to conservative treatment for this condition. Now a recent study suggests that prefabricated night splints may offer better results than the oft-recommended standing stretching in relieving symptoms of plantar fasciitis.
The open retrospective study, which was published in the July/August edition of The Journal of Foot And Ankle Surgery, revolved around 160 patients who had unilateral or bilateral plantar fasciitis. In addition to a standard treatment regimen, the re