Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • November 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 11
    New from Medicis, the antifungal Loprox Topical Suspension deeply permeates the skin’s cracks and crevices.

    2,425 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    Looking for a more durable antifungal medication that can give your patients better penetration? You may want to consider Loprox Topical Suspension (TS), a new antifungal medication from Medicis. According to Medicis, the cream- based Loprox TS permeates the skin’s cracks and crevices and does not rinse off after vigorous washing and rinsing in warm water. The company says you can use Loprox TS to treat large or hairy areas of the skin. The new cream is available in 30 and 60 mL sizes. Company: Medicis Product: Loprox Topical Suspension For more information, circle 398 on your reade... continue reading
    This shows the ultrasonic tranductor in the proper position for ESWT treatment. It allows you to locate the plantar fascia at its insertion. According to the author, the shockwaves are transmitted through the medial aspect of the foot.
    By David Zuckerman, DPM
    6,934 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    As podiatric physicians and surgeons, we would like to treat chronic plantar fasciitis without the risks and complications that are inherent to common plantar fascia releases. We have studied lower extremity biomechanics and have been taught that with all surgical procedures, we must understand and respect the function of the human foot and how each surgical procedure changes its specific function and stability. However, studies of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) have proven that we can cure chronic, insertional plantar fasciitis without exposing patients to any of the known risks (r... continue reading
    www.hospitalpodiatrists.org

Looking for an ally in your attempt to get staff privileges at a local hospital? If so, you may want to check out www.hospitalpodiatrists.org. It’s the official site of the American Association of Hospital and Healthcare Podia
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    10,664 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    While plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain, there’s not exactly a universal approach when it comes to conservative treatment for this condition. Now a recent study suggests that prefabricated night splints may offer better results than the oft-recommended standing stretching in relieving symptoms of plantar fasciitis. The open retrospective study, which was published in the July/August edition of The Journal of Foot And Ankle Surgery, revolved around 160 patients who had unilateral or bilateral plantar fasciitis. In addition to a standard treatment regimen, the re... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    3,602 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    Plug “podiatry” or “foot” into a Web search engine and thousands of entries can surface. In order not to get lost in the ocean of Web sites, there are numerous factors to consider. When potential patients have concerns about their feet or need treatment, the Internet may be the first environment to which they turn for information. Indeed, your site may be the first impression patients have of your practice. “A Web site should be a working part of your practice and not just a vanity site,” says Kirk Koepsel, DPM. “It’s like a welcome mat for your patients.” Evidence sugges ... continue reading
    Here is an AP view of a healed first MPJ fusion.
    By Jason S. Harrod, DPM
    6,605 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    There are many methods you can use to prepare the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) for arthrodesis. One of those techniques involves using a cup and cone reamer system. Using this system can be helpful, especially when there has been some trauma to the joint surface, when you’re dealing with an extremely arthritic joint with hypertrophy or when the patient has a square metatarsal head. These conditions could potentially prohibit an exact coaptation of the opposing bones. However, the cup and cone reamer system (Howmedica) is designed to take advantage of the convexity of the first met... continue reading
    The IPM Wound Gel by L.A.M. Pharmaceutical utilizes the power of 2.5% hylauronic acid. Two DPMs say the product promotes faster granulation and is easy to use.
    By Gina DiGironimo, Production Editor
    6,166 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    As more literature surfaces about the potential benefits of hyaluronic acid in healing difficult wounds, podiatrists are starting to take a closer look at the IPM Wound Gel, a 2.5% sodium hyaluronate-based wound dressing. According to L.A.M. Pharmaceutical, the manufacturer of the product, a study found that 27 patients with 53 refractory ulcers were able to achieve an 89 percent healing rate within 25 weeks of using the gel. Robert Snyder, DPM, says similar research on the IPM Wound Gel was conducted at the University of Miami.1 “Their data suggests the (IPM Wound Gel) may enha... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    4,624 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    Learning to trust and even like orthopedic surgeons was tough for me. I spent four years in podiatry school being warned that orthopods stay awake at night plotting the demise of podiatry. At the very least, I could expect a clever orthopod would ruin my career the first time I slipped up. My experience with orthopedic surgeons in my residency training created a greater fear and dislike for the specialty. The gruff and ornery old Dr. Borman was Chief of Orthopedics in the hospital where I trained. He chewed me out in front of a young extern one day because my hair was too long. He told me I c... continue reading
    Here is a close-up view of a neuropathic ulcer under the second metatarsal.
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    7,206 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    Neuropathic ulcers can be extremely problematic for diabetes patients and podiatrists alike. Exploring the ins and outs of surgical treatment, our expert panelists take a closer look at specific ulcers, helpful techniques, the merits of preoperative vascular testing and postoperative protocols. Q: Do you perform prophylactic diabetic foot surgery? If yes, what are the common types of situations in which you would use this treatment option? A: All of the panelists consider prophylactic surgery in diabetes patients when conservative treatment options have failed to resolve an ulcer. ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    2,711 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/02
    The statistics from a recently released government survey are staggering to say the least. Approximately 59 million adults in the United States over the age of 20 are obese. That’s almost a third of the country who are 30 or more pounds above a healthy body weight. According to the American Diabetes Association, the new figures on obesity have doubled from a similar survey done two decades ago. There’s no doubt about the link between these statistics and the increasing prevalence of Type 2 diabetes. Obviously, obese people are at a greater risk of insulin resistance and glucose intoler ... continue reading
    By Patrick DeHeer, DPM, and Stephen M. Offutt, DPM, MS
    42,565 reads | 1 comments | 11/03/02
    In a survey of professional athletic trainers and team physicians, Achilles tendonitis ranked third behind ankle sprains and plantar fasciitis as the primary presenting complaint within the athletic population.1 Additionally, it accounts for up to 18 percent of all running injuries.2 The condition is highly prevalent among runners, but it is also common in any athlete who endures repetitive high impact microtrauma.3 ... continue reading