Volume 15 - Issue 11 - November 2002

Feature »

Conquering Achilles Tendonitis In Athletes

By Patrick DeHeer, DPM, and Stephen M. Offutt, DPM, MS | 40309 reads | 1 comments

In a survey of professional athletic trainers and team physicians, Achilles tendonitis ranked third behind ankle sprains and plantar fasciitis as the primary presenting complaint within the athletic population.1 Additionally, it accounts for up to 18 percent of all running injuries.2 The condition is highly prevalent among runners, but it is also common in any athlete who endures repetitive high impact microtrauma.3



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Mastering Difficult Heel Ulcers

By Robert J. Snyder, DPM, CWS, and Heather Perrigo, RN | 27508 reads | 0 comments

Pressure ulcer disease represents a significant medical problem both nationally and internationally. Approximately 1.7 million people in the United States develop these maladies at an annual cost of between $2.2 billion and $3.6 billion.1 With the population aging, assisted living and nursing facilities flourishing and obesity creating catastrophic increases in diabetes and other diseases, it is likely the number of ulcerations will continue to increase.
The pressure ulcer is an area of localized damage to the skin and underlying tissue caused by pressure, sheer, friction and/or a



Feature »

Reconsider Biomechanical Causes In Heel Pain Cases

By David Levine, DPM, CPed | 6955 reads | 0 comments

Some days, it seems to be an epidemic. As you read the patient information sheet prior to entering the examination room to meet a patient for the first time, you start to wonder if everyone will eventually wind up with heel pain at some point in their lives. Sometimes it is easy to see why a person might be suffering with heel pain. Obesity, poor shoe selection and a job that requires extensive standing or walking are obvious contributing factors.
In other situations, the cause(s) might be more perplexing. For instance, when a patient who has already received orthotic devices or even one who



Feature »

What Studies Say About Shockwave Therapy

By David Zuckerman, DPM | 6299 reads | 0 comments

As podiatric physicians and surgeons, we would like to treat chronic plantar fasciitis without the risks and complications that are inherent to common plantar fascia releases. We have studied lower extremity biomechanics and have been taught that with all surgical procedures, we must understand and respect the function of the human foot and how each surgical procedure changes its specific function and stability.
However, studies of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) have proven that we can cure chronic, insertional plantar fasciitis without exposing patients to any of the known risks (r



Feature »

How To Build An Effective Web Site

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 3308 reads | 0 comments

Plug “podiatry” or “foot” into a Web search engine and thousands of entries can surface. In order not to get lost in the ocean of Web sites, there are numerous factors to consider. When potential patients have concerns about their feet or need treatment, the Internet may be the first environment to which they turn for information. Indeed, your site may be the first impression patients have of your practice.
“A Web site should be a working part of your practice and not just a vanity site,” says Kirk Koepsel, DPM. “It’s like a welcome mat for your patients.”
Evidence sugges



Forum »

Learning To Love Orthopods

By John McCord, DPM | 4328 reads | 0 comments

Learning to trust and even like orthopedic surgeons was tough for me. I spent four years in podiatry school being warned that orthopods stay awake at night plotting the demise of podiatry. At the very least, I could expect a clever orthopod would ruin my career the first time I slipped up.
My experience with orthopedic surgeons in my residency training created a greater fear and dislike for the specialty. The gruff and ornery old Dr. Borman was Chief of Orthopedics in the hospital where I trained. He chewed me out in front of a young extern one day because my hair was too long. He told me I c



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