Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • November 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 11
    The IPM Wound Gel by L.A.M. Pharmaceutical utilizes the power of 2.5% hylauronic acid. Two DPMs say the product promotes faster granulation and is easy to use.
    By Gina DiGironimo, Production Editor
    6,031 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    As more literature surfaces about the potential benefits of hyaluronic acid in healing difficult wounds, podiatrists are starting to take a closer look at the IPM Wound Gel, a 2.5% sodium hyaluronate-based wound dressing. According to L.A.M. Pharmaceutical, the manufacturer of the product, a study found that 27 patients with 53 refractory ulcers were able to achieve an 89 percent healing rate within 25 weeks of using the gel. Robert Snyder, DPM, says similar research on the IPM Wound Gel was conducted at the University of Miami.1 “Their data suggests the (IPM Wound Gel) may enha... continue reading
    Here is a close-up view of a neuropathic ulcer under the second metatarsal.
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    7,046 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Neuropathic ulcers can be extremely problematic for diabetes patients and podiatrists alike. Exploring the ins and outs of surgical treatment, our expert panelists take a closer look at specific ulcers, helpful techniques, the merits of preoperative vascular testing and postoperative protocols. Q: Do you perform prophylactic diabetic foot surgery? If yes, what are the common types of situations in which you would use this treatment option? A: All of the panelists consider prophylactic surgery in diabetes patients when conservative treatment options have failed to resolve an ulcer. ... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    4,537 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Learning to trust and even like orthopedic surgeons was tough for me. I spent four years in podiatry school being warned that orthopods stay awake at night plotting the demise of podiatry. At the very least, I could expect a clever orthopod would ruin my career the first time I slipped up. My experience with orthopedic surgeons in my residency training created a greater fear and dislike for the specialty. The gruff and ornery old Dr. Borman was Chief of Orthopedics in the hospital where I trained. He chewed me out in front of a young extern one day because my hair was too long. He told me I c... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    2,651 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The statistics from a recently released government survey are staggering to say the least. Approximately 59 million adults in the United States over the age of 20 are obese. That’s almost a third of the country who are 30 or more pounds above a healthy body weight. According to the American Diabetes Association, the new figures on obesity have doubled from a similar survey done two decades ago. There’s no doubt about the link between these statistics and the increasing prevalence of Type 2 diabetes. Obviously, obese people are at a greater risk of insulin resistance and glucose intoler ... continue reading
    By Patrick DeHeer, DPM, and Stephen M. Offutt, DPM, MS
    42,028 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    In a survey of professional athletic trainers and team physicians, Achilles tendonitis ranked third behind ankle sprains and plantar fasciitis as the primary presenting complaint within the athletic population.1 Additionally, it accounts for up to 18 percent of all running injuries.2 The condition is highly prevalent among runners, but it is also common in any athlete who endures repetitive high impact microtrauma.3 ... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    9,926 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    A patient comes into the office with pain in the posterior aspect of her ankle. She doesn’t recall injuring the leg, but notes she has had the pain for over six months and that it is present at all times. An active dancer with the local ballet company, the patient adds that she experiences chronic pain when doing any form of dancing. She says the pain is far worse with high heels and ballet shoes en-pointe, but finds it more tolerable when wearing stable flat shoes. The pain is deeper than the superficial Achilles tendon region and does not radiate to any region. An examination of the pat ... continue reading
    By Robert J. Snyder, DPM, CWS, and Heather Perrigo, RN
    28,720 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Pressure ulcer disease represents a significant medical problem both nationally and internationally. Approximately 1.7 million people in the United States develop these maladies at an annual cost of between $2.2 billion and $3.6 billion.1 With the population aging, assisted living and nursing facilities flourishing and obesity creating catastrophic increases in diabetes and other diseases, it is likely the number of ulcerations will continue to increase. The pressure ulcer is an area of localized damage to the skin and underlying tissue caused by pressure, sheer, friction and/or a ... continue reading

    2,914 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    In regard to the article “Restoring Sensation In Diabetic Patients” (see pg. 38, September issue) and the editorial (see “PSSD: Assessing Its Value And Potential,” pg. 12, September issue), we have been using the Pressure Specified Sensory Device (PSSD) at the University of Texas since March of 2001. We have been pleasantly surprised with the results of the testing. It has been beneficial in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients with nerve symptoms. The strength of the device is it allows you to look critically at the severity of nerve damage and allows earlier, more sensitive de ... continue reading
    By David Levine, DPM, CPed
    7,290 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Some days, it seems to be an epidemic. As you read the patient information sheet prior to entering the examination room to meet a patient for the first time, you start to wonder if everyone will eventually wind up with heel pain at some point in their lives. Sometimes it is easy to see why a person might be suffering with heel pain. Obesity, poor shoe selection and a job that requires extensive standing or walking are obvious contributing factors. In other situations, the cause(s) might be more perplexing. For instance, when a patient who has already received orthotic devices or even one who ... continue reading
    New from Medicis, the antifungal Loprox Topical Suspension deeply permeates the skin’s cracks and crevices.

    2,374 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Looking for a more durable antifungal medication that can give your patients better penetration? You may want to consider Loprox Topical Suspension (TS), a new antifungal medication from Medicis. According to Medicis, the cream- based Loprox TS permeates the skin’s cracks and crevices and does not rinse off after vigorous washing and rinsing in warm water. The company says you can use Loprox TS to treat large or hairy areas of the skin. The new cream is available in 30 and 60 mL sizes. Company: Medicis Product: Loprox Topical Suspension For more information, circle 398 on your reade... continue reading