Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • October 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 10
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in Chief
    2,028 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/02
    Procrastination is one thing, but the numbers of physicians who have applied for the one-year extension on complying with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is extremely low. One consultant notes (as this issue went to press) that less than 4 percent of members of the American Medical Association (AMA) have filed for the extension. Those who don’t file for the one-year extension on October 15 will be expected to be HIPAA compliant on October 16, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). While there are no specific numbers on how many D... continue reading
    You may see these radiographic findings (positive anterior drawer sign on the right and increased talar tilt on the left) for patients who have severe lateral ankle pain following a severe ankle sprain. According to the author, when patients take a coxib,
    By Matt Rampetsreiter, DPM
    11,462 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/02
    Are COX-2 inhibitors good alternatives to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)? Yes, traditional NSAIDs inhibit both COX enzymes but they have well-documented gastrointestinal side effects. NSAIDs can cause severe electrolyte disturbances and renal complications such as hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, edema, hypertension, acute and chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, papillary necrosis and glomerular lesions. Patients with prostaglandin-depleted disease states (cirrhosis, congestive heart failure, chronic renal failure, volume depletion, and nephrosis) who use NSAIDs often develop acute ... continue reading