Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • October 2007 | Volume 20 - Issue 10
    By Patrick DeHeer, DPM, and Debra Mardis, DPM
    19,683 reads | 0 comments | 10/24/08
    Given the frequency with which overuse injuries occur in athletic patients, this author offers insights and pearls on treating common injuries ranging from posterior tibial tendon injuries and tibialis anterior tendinitis to peroneal tendon injuries and Achilles tendon injuries. Approximately 50 percent of all sports injuries are secondary to overuse.1 Overuse injuries result from repetitive microtrauma that leads to local tissue damage in the form of cellular and extracellular degeneration. Injury is most likely to occur when an athlete changes the intensity or length of training. This has... continue reading
    By Lawrence A. Lavery, DPM
    5,901 reads | 0 comments | 10/24/08
    Assessing skin temperatures in the diabetic foot can help identify patients at a high risk for various complications. Accordingly, this author shares insights from the research on the possible advantages of using digital thermometry as a self-assessment tool to help prevent diabetic foot ulcers. Preventing foot ulceration and re-ulceration in high-risk patients with diabetes is a challenge. Clinical outcomes are much better when high-risk patients receive proper foot care, education and protective shoes. There is a growing body of work which demonstrates that programs aimed at treatm... continue reading
    By Alexander Reyzelman, DPM, Joseph Fiorito, Cody Hoover and Michael Brewer
    13,764 reads | 0 comments | 10/24/08
    Are peripheral nerve pathologies the root cause of a patient’s lower extremity pain? These authors discuss entrapment neuropathies, large fiber neuropathy and lumbosacral radiculopathy, among other conditions, and share their insights on helpful diagnostic tools. In the podiatric profession, we are frequently faced with chronic painful musculoskeletal processes that get labeled as arthritis, chronic plantar fasciitis, neuroma, etc. Perhaps it would behoove us to start thinking of an underlying neurological pathology that may be responsible for foot or ankle pain. In the senior ... continue reading