Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • September 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 9
    Here is an anterior-posterior (AP) view of the right ankle. Note the severe varus deformity and degeneration secondary to post-polio syndrome.
    By Jesse B. Burks, DPM, MS
    10,213 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/02
    Numerous conditions can result in the need for arthrodesis of the ankle joint. In particular, neuropathic osteoarthropathy, post-polio syndrome, neuromuscular disease and severe degeneration secondary to trauma can all make it especially difficult for podiatric surgeons to achieve a successful fusion.1-4 Although implant arthroplasty is gaining acceptance and distraction arthroplasty may postpone the joint destructive procedure, arthrodesis remains a viable and effective treatment for patients with gross deformity of the ankle. While all patients will require modifications in surg... continue reading
    This woman has rheumatoid vasculitic ulcers on both of her legs. Dr. Karlock says he has used growth factors with success on vasculitic ulcers.

    10,593 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/02
    The array of wound care products can be quite astounding. Choosing the right product(s) for your patient can be difficult. With this in mind, our panelists, strongly emphasizing case-by-case management, share their experiences, success stories and caveats with certain wound care products. Read on for what five expert panelists had to say about treating neuropathic ulcers, when to use growth factors and the role of wet-to-dry dressings. Q: What wound care products do you use on the diabetic neuropathic ulcer? A: All of the panelists agree that appropriate product selection is done on ... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    2,086 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/02
    I usually enjoy my work. My office is efficient. The patients appreciate our help. My staff is like family. Most weeks go by fast and end upbeat. Last week was an exception. The efficient office self-destructed when the computer medical billing program died. Something corrupted all the financial data and it vanished. The backup tapes were disabled. Neither the software support guy nor the hardware technician could bring it back to life. The vascular surgeon with whom I have shared space for the past four years suffered a major bout of burnout and left practice last week. He is 44 and looks 60 ... continue reading
    Here is a follow-up view of the same patient. Three weeks later, the eruption had cleared with twice daily application of ciclopirox 0.77% cream.
    By James Q. Del Rosso, DO, FAOCD
    17,504 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/02
    Dermatoses of the lower extremities are fairly common.1 These conditions include infectious, inflammatory, vascular, neoplastic and traumatic dermatoses. Many dermatologic conditions (i.e. psoriasis, lichen planus) that exhibit the potential for widespread distribution can be prone to occur on the legs, ankles or feet in some patients. Other disorders characteristically involve the lower extremities. For example, dyshidrotic eczema and pitted keratolysis are examples of dermatoses that involve the plantar surface of the foot. ... continue reading