Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
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  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • September 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 9
    Langer introduces the L.XCEL orthosis with computer-aided technology for 
custom orthotics.

    4,642 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/02
    Looking for a custom orthotic that will improve the gait of your patients? Look no further than the Langer L.XCEL orthotic line, which minimizes energy consumption and absorbs forces created by weight stress transmission during gait. According to Langer, the new orthoses are the result of computer-aided technology that is used to evaluate patient models and create custom orthotics from two proprietary materials: LangerFlex and LangerZorb. Langer notes the L.XCEL orthotics are made from either a plastic cast or foam impression, and are value-priced at $55. For an additional charge, patie... continue reading
    This photomicrograph of a type 1 diabetic primate was taken from the ulnar nerve in an area of no known site of anatomical entrapment.  Note the significant endoneurial and sub-epineurial edema.
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM
    9,443 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/02
    Statistics from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) reveal there were 86,000 amputations due to complications from diabetes mellitus in 2000. The ADA also points out that 50 to 70 percent of these patients will develop peripheral neuropathy sometime in the course of their disease.1 The most widely believed paradigm in mainstream medicine today is that loss of sensation in diabetic peripheral neuropathy is irreversible and the only treatment available is the achievement of euglycemic control and the ancillary use of medicines such as Elavil and Neurontin.2 Sadly, this... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,569 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/02
    Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently discovered the first reported case of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) in the world. The organism was identified in a patient in Michigan, had not spread to anyone else and is susceptible to other antibiotics, according to the CDC Web site. The 40-year-old woman was treated on an outpatient basis, has complicated diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, and undergoes hemodialysis on a regular basis, according to Dr. David Johnson, Deputy Director and Chief Medical Executive of the Michigan D... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    5,444 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/02
    The pursuit of a better testing method for diabetic peripheral neuropathy has spurred the re-emergence of the Pressure Specified Sensory Device (PSSD) and accompanying debate over its potential utility. Yes, the NCV test and the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament allow you to test for the presence of neuropathy. However, in his article, “Restoring Sensation In Diabetic Patients” (see page 38), Stephen Barrett, DPM, says the monofilament does not “quantify or stage the level of peripheral neuropathy” and neither test enables you to assess “early stages of isolated peripheral nerve compres ... continue reading