Volume 15 - Issue 9 - September 2002

Surgical Pearls »

Is Arthrodesis The Answer For A Severely Deformed Ankle?

By Jesse B. Burks, DPM, MS | 9128 reads | 0 comments

Numerous conditions can result in the need for arthrodesis of the ankle joint. In particular, neuropathic osteoarthropathy, post-polio syndrome, neuromuscular disease and severe degeneration secondary to trauma can all make it especially difficult for podiatric surgeons to achieve a successful fusion.1-4 Although implant arthroplasty is gaining acceptance and distraction arthroplasty may postpone the joint destructive procedure, arthrodesis remains a viable and effective treatment for patients with gross deformity of the ankle.
While all patients will require modifications in surg



Wound Care Q&A »

Expert Insights On Wound Care Products

9615 reads | 0 comments

The array of wound care products can be quite astounding. Choosing the right product(s) for your patient can be difficult. With this in mind, our panelists, strongly emphasizing case-by-case management, share their experiences, success stories and caveats with certain wound care products. Read on for what five expert panelists had to say about treating neuropathic ulcers, when to use growth factors and the role of wet-to-dry dressings.
Q: What wound care products do you use on the diabetic neuropathic ulcer?
A:
All of the panelists agree that appropriate product selection is done on



Feature »

How To Handle Common Skin Dermatoses

By James Q. Del Rosso, DO, FAOCD | 14543 reads | 0 comments

Dermatoses of the lower extremities are fairly common.1 These conditions include infectious, inflammatory, vascular, neoplastic and traumatic dermatoses. Many dermatologic conditions (i.e. psoriasis, lichen planus) that exhibit the potential for widespread distribution can be prone to occur on the legs, ankles or feet in some patients. Other disorders characteristically involve the lower extremities. For example, dyshidrotic eczema and pitted keratolysis are examples of dermatoses that involve the plantar surface of the foot.



Feature »

Essential Tips For Tackling Football Injuries

By Richard T. Braver, DPM | 7826 reads | 0 comments

High contact. High intensity. It’s no surprise that many injuries occur on the football field. An injury may occur as an athlete is blocking an opposing player or as he is being tackled by another player. Other injuries may occur when players either sprint downfield, make sharp cuts to avoid being tackled, or make other movements that involve much rotation in order to catch or deflect the football. Playing surfaces can also lead to injuries (see “Artificial Turf Vs. Natural Grass: Which Is Better?” on page 48).
Certainly, the first metatarsal phalangeal joint is one of the most injured



Feature »

Ten Pearls For Treating Difficult Nails

By Aditya K. Gupta, MD, PhD, and Jennifer Ryder, HBSc | 9612 reads | 0 comments

Onychomycosis is a common nail infection, which is often chronic, difficult to eradicate and tends to recur.1 Current therapeutic approaches include mechanical or chemical avulsion, topical therapy, oral therapy or a combination of one or more of these treatment modalities. Treatment of onychomycosis has improved greatly with the addition of broad-spectrum oral antifungal agents and topical nail lacquers. However, even with the therapeutic advances, onychomycosis continues to increase in prevalence, treatment is not always successful, and relapse and reinfection may occur even after



Feature »

Eight Steps To Improving Your Practice

By Steven D. Chinn, DPM, MS | 4637 reads | 0 comments

All medical practices are essentially small enterprises, not very different from any of the Fortune 500 companies. Practices generate revenue by providing services or selling products. They also have expenses for staff, rent, equipment and insurance. There are also elements of marketing, finance, human resources, etc. Like all companies, podiatric practices are challenged by inefficiency and the desire to continue improving on their profit margins.
When the typical private practitioner hears phrases such as “Quality Improvement,” “Total Quality Management (TQM)” or “Process Enhancem