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  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • September 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 9

    5,996 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/02
    It was with great incredulity that I read the article by Dr. Barrett entitled “A Closer Look At Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy” (see the May issue, pg. 38). He writes: “Prior to the development of endoscopic foot surgery, there was a strong desire not only to find a better, less invasive method to treat … plantar fasciitis surgically … Indeed, the standard of care … has changed radically since the … EPF.” The inference here, of course, is that after EPF, that desire has been fulfilled and it is now the standard of care. The truth is that in the facilities where I perform surger... continue reading
    Athletes often injure their toes on artificial turf, as seen here. The condition known as turf toe often requires taping and a turf toe plate.
    By Richard T. Braver, DPM
    9,368 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/02
    High contact. High intensity. It’s no surprise that many injuries occur on the football field. An injury may occur as an athlete is blocking an opposing player or as he is being tackled by another player. Other injuries may occur when players either sprint downfield, make sharp cuts to avoid being tackled, or make other movements that involve much rotation in order to catch or deflect the football. Playing surfaces can also lead to injuries (see “Artificial Turf Vs. Natural Grass: Which Is Better?” on page 48). Certainly, the first metatarsal phalangeal joint is one of the most injured ... continue reading
    By Pamela M. Jensen, DPM
    7,589 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/02
    Diet and exercise are essential for blood sugar management and are subject of much frustration for the diabetic patient and the physician. With each visit to the physician’s office, the patient has to anticipate the stern lecture about exercising, controlling his or her diet, abstaining from sweets, and testing his or her sugars regularly or face the multitude of complications from diabetes. In addition, physicians may also give a patient a handout with the recommendations from the American Diabetes Association. But does this method work? King and Armstrong studied the effectiveness of thi... continue reading
    Here is a close-up view of moderate onychomycosis.
    By Aditya K. Gupta, MD, PhD, and Jennifer Ryder, HBSc
    12,167 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/02
    Onychomycosis is a common nail infection, which is often chronic, difficult to eradicate and tends to recur.1 Current therapeutic approaches include mechanical or chemical avulsion, topical therapy, oral therapy or a combination of one or more of these treatment modalities. Treatment of onychomycosis has improved greatly with the addition of broad-spectrum oral antifungal agents and topical nail lacquers. However, even with the therapeutic advances, onychomycosis continues to increase in prevalence, treatment is not always successful, and relapse and reinfection may occur even after... continue reading