Volume 15 - Issue 9 - September 2002

Feature »

How To Handle Common Skin Dermatoses

By James Q. Del Rosso, DO, FAOCD | 16560 reads | 0 comments

Dermatoses of the lower extremities are fairly common.1 These conditions include infectious, inflammatory, vascular, neoplastic and traumatic dermatoses. Many dermatologic conditions (i.e. psoriasis, lichen planus) that exhibit the potential for widespread distribution can be prone to occur on the legs, ankles or feet in some patients. Other disorders characteristically involve the lower extremities. For example, dyshidrotic eczema and pitted keratolysis are examples of dermatoses that involve the plantar surface of the foot.



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Essential Tips For Tackling Football Injuries

By Richard T. Braver, DPM | 8384 reads | 0 comments

High contact. High intensity. It’s no surprise that many injuries occur on the football field. An injury may occur as an athlete is blocking an opposing player or as he is being tackled by another player. Other injuries may occur when players either sprint downfield, make sharp cuts to avoid being tackled, or make other movements that involve much rotation in order to catch or deflect the football. Playing surfaces can also lead to injuries (see “Artificial Turf Vs. Natural Grass: Which Is Better?” on page 48).
Certainly, the first metatarsal phalangeal joint is one of the most injured



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Ten Pearls For Treating Difficult Nails

By Aditya K. Gupta, MD, PhD, and Jennifer Ryder, HBSc | 10514 reads | 0 comments

Onychomycosis is a common nail infection, which is often chronic, difficult to eradicate and tends to recur.1 Current therapeutic approaches include mechanical or chemical avulsion, topical therapy, oral therapy or a combination of one or more of these treatment modalities. Treatment of onychomycosis has improved greatly with the addition of broad-spectrum oral antifungal agents and topical nail lacquers. However, even with the therapeutic advances, onychomycosis continues to increase in prevalence, treatment is not always successful, and relapse and reinfection may occur even after



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Eight Steps To Improving Your Practice

By Steven D. Chinn, DPM, MS | 4993 reads | 0 comments

All medical practices are essentially small enterprises, not very different from any of the Fortune 500 companies. Practices generate revenue by providing services or selling products. They also have expenses for staff, rent, equipment and insurance. There are also elements of marketing, finance, human resources, etc. Like all companies, podiatric practices are challenged by inefficiency and the desire to continue improving on their profit margins.
When the typical private practitioner hears phrases such as “Quality Improvement,” “Total Quality Management (TQM)” or “Process Enhancem



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Restoring Sensation In Diabetic Patients

By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM | 8670 reads | 0 comments

Statistics from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) reveal there were 86,000 amputations due to complications from diabetes mellitus in 2000. The ADA also points out that 50 to 70 percent of these patients will develop peripheral neuropathy sometime in the course of their disease.1
The most widely believed paradigm in mainstream medicine today is that loss of sensation in diabetic peripheral neuropathy is irreversible and the only treatment available is the achievement of euglycemic control and the ancillary use of medicines such as Elavil and Neurontin.2 Sadly, this



Editor's Perspective »

PSSD: Assessing Its Value And Potential

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 4886 reads | 0 comments

The pursuit of a better testing method for diabetic peripheral neuropathy has spurred the re-emergence of the Pressure Specified Sensory Device (PSSD) and accompanying debate over its potential utility.
Yes, the NCV test and the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament allow you to test for the presence of neuropathy. However, in his article, “Restoring Sensation In Diabetic Patients” (see page 38), Stephen Barrett, DPM, says the monofilament does not “quantify or stage the level of peripheral neuropathy” and neither test enables you to assess “early stages of isolated peripheral nerve compres



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