Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • September 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 9
    Langer introduces the L.XCEL orthosis with computer-aided technology for 
custom orthotics.

    4,363 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Looking for a custom orthotic that will improve the gait of your patients? Look no further than the Langer L.XCEL orthotic line, which minimizes energy consumption and absorbs forces created by weight stress transmission during gait. According to Langer, the new orthoses are the result of computer-aided technology that is used to evaluate patient models and create custom orthotics from two proprietary materials: LangerFlex and LangerZorb. Langer notes the L.XCEL orthotics are made from either a plastic cast or foam impression, and are value-priced at $55. For an additional charge, patie... continue reading
    This photomicrograph of a type 1 diabetic primate was taken from the ulnar nerve in an area of no known site of anatomical entrapment.  Note the significant endoneurial and sub-epineurial edema.
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM
    8,941 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Statistics from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) reveal there were 86,000 amputations due to complications from diabetes mellitus in 2000. The ADA also points out that 50 to 70 percent of these patients will develop peripheral neuropathy sometime in the course of their disease.1 The most widely believed paradigm in mainstream medicine today is that loss of sensation in diabetic peripheral neuropathy is irreversible and the only treatment available is the achievement of euglycemic control and the ancillary use of medicines such as Elavil and Neurontin.2 Sadly, this... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,138 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently discovered the first reported case of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) in the world. The organism was identified in a patient in Michigan, had not spread to anyone else and is susceptible to other antibiotics, according to the CDC Web site. The 40-year-old woman was treated on an outpatient basis, has complicated diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, and undergoes hemodialysis on a regular basis, according to Dr. David Johnson, Deputy Director and Chief Medical Executive of the Michigan D... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    5,064 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The pursuit of a better testing method for diabetic peripheral neuropathy has spurred the re-emergence of the Pressure Specified Sensory Device (PSSD) and accompanying debate over its potential utility. Yes, the NCV test and the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament allow you to test for the presence of neuropathy. However, in his article, “Restoring Sensation In Diabetic Patients” (see page 38), Stephen Barrett, DPM, says the monofilament does not “quantify or stage the level of peripheral neuropathy” and neither test enables you to assess “early stages of isolated peripheral nerve compres... continue reading
    Here is an anterior-posterior (AP) view of the right ankle. Note the severe varus deformity and degeneration secondary to post-polio syndrome.
    By Jesse B. Burks, DPM, MS
    10,018 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Numerous conditions can result in the need for arthrodesis of the ankle joint. In particular, neuropathic osteoarthropathy, post-polio syndrome, neuromuscular disease and severe degeneration secondary to trauma can all make it especially difficult for podiatric surgeons to achieve a successful fusion.1-4 Although implant arthroplasty is gaining acceptance and distraction arthroplasty may postpone the joint destructive procedure, arthrodesis remains a viable and effective treatment for patients with gross deformity of the ankle. While all patients will require modifications in surg... continue reading
    This woman has rheumatoid vasculitic ulcers on both of her legs. Dr. Karlock says he has used growth factors with success on vasculitic ulcers.

    10,455 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The array of wound care products can be quite astounding. Choosing the right product(s) for your patient can be difficult. With this in mind, our panelists, strongly emphasizing case-by-case management, share their experiences, success stories and caveats with certain wound care products. Read on for what five expert panelists had to say about treating neuropathic ulcers, when to use growth factors and the role of wet-to-dry dressings. Q: What wound care products do you use on the diabetic neuropathic ulcer? A: All of the panelists agree that appropriate product selection is done on ... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    2,031 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I usually enjoy my work. My office is efficient. The patients appreciate our help. My staff is like family. Most weeks go by fast and end upbeat. Last week was an exception. The efficient office self-destructed when the computer medical billing program died. Something corrupted all the financial data and it vanished. The backup tapes were disabled. Neither the software support guy nor the hardware technician could bring it back to life. The vascular surgeon with whom I have shared space for the past four years suffered a major bout of burnout and left practice last week. He is 44 and looks 60... continue reading
    Here is a follow-up view of the same patient. Three weeks later, the eruption had cleared with twice daily application of ciclopirox 0.77% cream.
    By James Q. Del Rosso, DO, FAOCD
    17,237 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Dermatoses of the lower extremities are fairly common.1 These conditions include infectious, inflammatory, vascular, neoplastic and traumatic dermatoses. Many dermatologic conditions (i.e. psoriasis, lichen planus) that exhibit the potential for widespread distribution can be prone to occur on the legs, ankles or feet in some patients. Other disorders characteristically involve the lower extremities. For example, dyshidrotic eczema and pitted keratolysis are examples of dermatoses that involve the plantar surface of the foot. ... continue reading

    5,439 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    It was with great incredulity that I read the article by Dr. Barrett entitled “A Closer Look At Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy” (see the May issue, pg. 38). He writes: “Prior to the development of endoscopic foot surgery, there was a strong desire not only to find a better, less invasive method to treat … plantar fasciitis surgically … Indeed, the standard of care … has changed radically since the … EPF.” The inference here, of course, is that after EPF, that desire has been fulfilled and it is now the standard of care. The truth is that in the facilities where I perform surger... continue reading
    Athletes often injure their toes on artificial turf, as seen here. The condition known as turf toe often requires taping and a turf toe plate.
    By Richard T. Braver, DPM
    8,641 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    High contact. High intensity. It’s no surprise that many injuries occur on the football field. An injury may occur as an athlete is blocking an opposing player or as he is being tackled by another player. Other injuries may occur when players either sprint downfield, make sharp cuts to avoid being tackled, or make other movements that involve much rotation in order to catch or deflect the football. Playing surfaces can also lead to injuries (see “Artificial Turf Vs. Natural Grass: Which Is Better?” on page 48). Certainly, the first metatarsal phalangeal joint is one of the most injured ... continue reading