Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • August 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 8
    A new randomized study questions the widespread prescription of therapeutic shoes for those with diabetic ulcers, but some DPMs dispute that assertion.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,862 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Podiatrists often turn to therapeutic footwear when trying to prevent re-ulceration in diabetic patients. A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests regular shoes may work just as well for some of those patients, although some DPMs question the study. The randomized study was comprised of 400 men and women who had diabetes and a history of foot ulcers. The first group of 121 patients wore extra-depth therapeutic shoes and customized cork inserts. The second group of 119 patients wore therapeutic shoes and prefabricated, polyurethane inserts. The control... continue reading
    Here is a polypropylene functional foot orthosis with an EVA rearfoot post. The author notes that one of the great advantages of polypropylene is its ability to conform to curves of the foot very tightly.
    By Alona Kashanian, DPM
    13,231 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Most competitive runners do not like being restricted in their regimens. As we all know, these patients are very anxious to resume their running activity. However, they do look to foot and ankle specialists for help in reducing the inflammation, preventing and/or recuperating from lower extremity injuries. In order to write effective orthotic prescriptions for these patients, be sure to pay attention to cast correction, materials and additional bells and whistles. The ability of the orthosis to control abnormal or excessive motion of the foot is more dependent on the size of the device and th... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM, Ann Gagne, LLB, and Eric Kaplan, BS
    35,445 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Ice hockey is widely known as one of the world’s fastest and most dangerous sports. With the game’s popularity growing at record levels, participation in ice hockey in the United States has experienced substantial growth over the last decade. Over 400,000 male players and 40,000 female players participate under the auspices of USA Hockey (the national hockey governing body), compared to about 190,000 male and 6,300 female players ten years ago. With the increased participation in hockey has come an increasing number of injuries. The potential for hockey injuries stem from razor sharp skat... continue reading

    8,513 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    You may prescribe orthotics for a variety of problems. However, the success or failure of treatment may depend on the type of shoes your patients wear along with the type of modifications which you make to the shoe. With this in mind, our expert panelists address the use of shoe modifications as an adjunct to care. Q: What type of modifications do you use most often and how does this affect patient symptoms? A: Nicholas Sol, DPM, says he most commonly prescribes a double rocker sole. He says most of his colleagues have a supply of these soles in the form of their cast shoes and boo... continue reading