Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • August 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 8
    By John McCord, DPM
    4,774 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Nothing in podiatry school prepared me for my least favorite task in residency training, the complete preoperative history and physical examination. I chose podiatry partly because of the emotional and physical distance it afforded me with patients. We can do a lot for people’s feet without getting up close and personal. I’m a warm and friendly guy but I tend to get a little nervous when someone outside my family invades my 18-inch personal space barrier. It’s impossible to do a complete physical examination without invading the patient’s personal space, thus having my own space inva... continue reading
    By Janice G. Roven, JD, LLM
    6,475 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    You may not be able to prevent a malpractice claim from ever being filed against you (there are a lot of folks out there looking for an easy payday). However, there are proactive steps you can take to safeguard and successfully defend your practice should a lawsuit be filed against you. Although there are basic theories of malpractice prevention, I have found it helpful to teach prevention by example. Think Twice About Testifying Against Colleagues Case One: I represented a podiatrist who was truly disturbed about being sued. When I met with him to discuss this matter, he informed me th... continue reading
    A new randomized study questions the widespread prescription of therapeutic shoes for those with diabetic ulcers, but some DPMs dispute that assertion.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,791 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Podiatrists often turn to therapeutic footwear when trying to prevent re-ulceration in diabetic patients. A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests regular shoes may work just as well for some of those patients, although some DPMs question the study. The randomized study was comprised of 400 men and women who had diabetes and a history of foot ulcers. The first group of 121 patients wore extra-depth therapeutic shoes and customized cork inserts. The second group of 119 patients wore therapeutic shoes and prefabricated, polyurethane inserts. The control... continue reading
    Here is a polypropylene functional foot orthosis with an EVA rearfoot post. The author notes that one of the great advantages of polypropylene is its ability to conform to curves of the foot very tightly.
    By Alona Kashanian, DPM
    13,103 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Most competitive runners do not like being restricted in their regimens. As we all know, these patients are very anxious to resume their running activity. However, they do look to foot and ankle specialists for help in reducing the inflammation, preventing and/or recuperating from lower extremity injuries. In order to write effective orthotic prescriptions for these patients, be sure to pay attention to cast correction, materials and additional bells and whistles. The ability of the orthosis to control abnormal or excessive motion of the foot is more dependent on the size of the device and th... continue reading