Volume 15 - Issue 8 - August 2002

Feature »

How To Prescribe Orthotics For Runners

By Alona Kashanian, DPM | 12957 reads | 0 comments

Most competitive runners do not like being restricted in their regimens. As we all know, these patients are very anxious to resume their running activity. However, they do look to foot and ankle specialists for help in reducing the inflammation, preventing and/or recuperating from lower extremity injuries. In order to write effective orthotic prescriptions for these patients, be sure to pay attention to cast correction, materials and additional bells and whistles.
The ability of the orthosis to control abnormal or excessive motion of the foot is more dependent on the size of the device and th



Orthotics Q&A »

Modification Tips: Making Sure The Shoe Fits

8281 reads | 0 comments

You may prescribe orthotics for a variety of problems. However, the success or failure of treatment may depend on the type of shoes your patients wear along with the type of modifications which you make to the shoe. With this in mind, our expert panelists address the use of shoe modifications as an adjunct to care.

Q: What type of modifications do you use most often and how does this affect patient symptoms?
A:
Nicholas Sol, DPM, says he most commonly prescribes a double rocker sole. He says most of his colleagues have a supply of these soles in the form of their cast shoes and boo



Point-Counterpoint »

Bunions: Are Proximal Osteotomies Necessary?

By John McCord, DPM, and Mark Hofbauer, DPM | 11637 reads | 0 comments

Yes, if the procedure is done correctly, it is a valuable adjunct to bunion correction, says John McCord, DPM.

Who will ever forget the memorable autistic man played by Dustin Hoffman in the film Rain Man? My favorite scene was when he refused to fly on any airline but Quantas because that carrier had no history of accidents. I reflect on that scene when I talk with colleagues in podiatry who refuse to consider performing proximal osteotomies while correcting bunion deformities. Their logic makes as much sense as the Rain Man in that they will choose a head osteotomy even though it w



Feature »

Win The Battle Against Postoperative Infections

By Stacey Stefansky, DPM, Thanh L. Dinh, DPM, and Barry Rosenblum, DPM | 13883 reads | 0 comments

Despite advances in aseptic technique and antibiotic prophylaxis, post-operative infections remain a significant complication following podiatric surgery. Postoperative infections can increase morbidity, lengthen recuperation time and compromise the success of a surgical procedure. Data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that postoperative infections occur in 2.1 percent of all clean, uncontaminated surgical procedures.1
Studies pertaining specifically to podiatric surgery have produced comparable postoperative infection rates. Hugar, et. al., demonstr



Diabetes Watch »

What NIH Statistics Reveal About Diabetes Prevalence

By John Steinberg, DPM | 8070 reads | 0 comments

Given the trends indicating the increasing prevalence of diabetes in the United States, this national health concern has commanded a drastic increase in general public media attention. According to an American Diabetes Association study, the overall costs for diabetes total $98 billion, with direct medical costs of $44 billion and indirect expenses (such as disability, work loss and premature mortality) adding up to $54 billion.
There are numerous statistics and information sources which can help you achieve to establish a better understanding of the disease and its impact on the health care



Forum »

A Change Of Heart Over Pre-Op Exams

By John McCord, DPM | 4714 reads | 0 comments

Nothing in podiatry school prepared me for my least favorite task in residency training, the complete preoperative history and physical examination. I chose podiatry partly because of the emotional and physical distance it afforded me with patients. We can do a lot for people’s feet without getting up close and personal. I’m a warm and friendly guy but I tend to get a little nervous when someone outside my family invades my 18-inch personal space barrier.
It’s impossible to do a complete physical examination without invading the patient’s personal space, thus having my own space inva