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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • August 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 8
    By John McCord, DPM
    4,774 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Nothing in podiatry school prepared me for my least favorite task in residency training, the complete preoperative history and physical examination. I chose podiatry partly because of the emotional and physical distance it afforded me with patients. We can do a lot for people’s feet without getting up close and personal. I’m a warm and friendly guy but I tend to get a little nervous when someone outside my family invades my 18-inch personal space barrier. It’s impossible to do a complete physical examination without invading the patient’s personal space, thus having my own space inva... continue reading
    By Janice G. Roven, JD, LLM
    6,475 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    You may not be able to prevent a malpractice claim from ever being filed against you (there are a lot of folks out there looking for an easy payday). However, there are proactive steps you can take to safeguard and successfully defend your practice should a lawsuit be filed against you. Although there are basic theories of malpractice prevention, I have found it helpful to teach prevention by example. Think Twice About Testifying Against Colleagues Case One: I represented a podiatrist who was truly disturbed about being sued. When I met with him to discuss this matter, he informed me th... continue reading
    A new randomized study questions the widespread prescription of therapeutic shoes for those with diabetic ulcers, but some DPMs dispute that assertion.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,791 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Podiatrists often turn to therapeutic footwear when trying to prevent re-ulceration in diabetic patients. A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests regular shoes may work just as well for some of those patients, although some DPMs question the study. The randomized study was comprised of 400 men and women who had diabetes and a history of foot ulcers. The first group of 121 patients wore extra-depth therapeutic shoes and customized cork inserts. The second group of 119 patients wore therapeutic shoes and prefabricated, polyurethane inserts. The control... continue reading
    Here is a polypropylene functional foot orthosis with an EVA rearfoot post. The author notes that one of the great advantages of polypropylene is its ability to conform to curves of the foot very tightly.
    By Alona Kashanian, DPM
    13,103 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Most competitive runners do not like being restricted in their regimens. As we all know, these patients are very anxious to resume their running activity. However, they do look to foot and ankle specialists for help in reducing the inflammation, preventing and/or recuperating from lower extremity injuries. In order to write effective orthotic prescriptions for these patients, be sure to pay attention to cast correction, materials and additional bells and whistles. The ability of the orthosis to control abnormal or excessive motion of the foot is more dependent on the size of the device and th... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM, Ann Gagne, LLB, and Eric Kaplan, BS
    35,042 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Ice hockey is widely known as one of the world’s fastest and most dangerous sports. With the game’s popularity growing at record levels, participation in ice hockey in the United States has experienced substantial growth over the last decade. Over 400,000 male players and 40,000 female players participate under the auspices of USA Hockey (the national hockey governing body), compared to about 190,000 male and 6,300 female players ten years ago. With the increased participation in hockey has come an increasing number of injuries. The potential for hockey injuries stem from razor sharp skat... continue reading

    8,431 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    You may prescribe orthotics for a variety of problems. However, the success or failure of treatment may depend on the type of shoes your patients wear along with the type of modifications which you make to the shoe. With this in mind, our expert panelists address the use of shoe modifications as an adjunct to care. Q: What type of modifications do you use most often and how does this affect patient symptoms? A: Nicholas Sol, DPM, says he most commonly prescribes a double rocker sole. He says most of his colleagues have a supply of these soles in the form of their cast shoes and boo... continue reading
    The Spenco 2nd Skin Advanced First Aid products with Hyaluronan reportedly shorten healing time and minimize the formation of scar tissue.

    1,772 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    If you want to give your patients an advanced healing alternative, you may want to check out a new product line that promises quicker results and reduced scar visibility. The Spenco Medical Corporation is offering the Spenco 2nd Skin Advanced First Aid products with hyaluronan. According to Spenco, the patented hyaluronan formula provides a pattern for tissue repair in wounds that facilitates shortened healing time and has been clinically proven to minimize the formation of scar tissue on various wounds. Spenco says this product line will offer an alternative to antibiotic ointments. The ... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM, and Mark Hofbauer, DPM
    11,822 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Yes, if the procedure is done correctly, it is a valuable adjunct to bunion correction, says John McCord, DPM. Who will ever forget the memorable autistic man played by Dustin Hoffman in the film Rain Man? My favorite scene was when he refused to fly on any airline but Quantas because that carrier had no history of accidents. I reflect on that scene when I talk with colleagues in podiatry who refuse to consider performing proximal osteotomies while correcting bunion deformities. Their logic makes as much sense as the Rain Man in that they will choose a head osteotomy even though it w... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    1,831 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    My sister gave me a wonderful Christmas present a couple of years ago. Knowing of my fondness for jazz, she went on eBay and bid for a black and white portrait of the great Miles Davis. The striking photo shows a very young Davis (perhaps in his early 20s at the time of the photo) with trumpet in hand and a music chart in front of him. He appears thoughtful and contemplative in the photo, as if he’s pondering where the next note will take him. The portrait of the late jazz innovator was used as part of an old Apple Computer ad campaign. The simply stated ad tagline in the top right-hand ... continue reading
    By Stacey Stefansky, DPM, Thanh L. Dinh, DPM, and Barry Rosenblum, DPM
    14,048 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Despite advances in aseptic technique and antibiotic prophylaxis, post-operative infections remain a significant complication following podiatric surgery. Postoperative infections can increase morbidity, lengthen recuperation time and compromise the success of a surgical procedure. Data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that postoperative infections occur in 2.1 percent of all clean, uncontaminated surgical procedures.1 Studies pertaining specifically to podiatric surgery have produced comparable postoperative infection rates. Hugar, et. al., demonstr... continue reading