Volume 15 - Issue 8 - August 2002

Feature »

How To Conquer Crossover Second Toe Syndrome

By Babak Baravarian, DPM | 67841 reads | 0 comments

The crossover second toe is an extremely difficult problem for foot and ankle surgeons. Often, with the initial presentation, the deformity has progressed to the point where it is one subsection of a multitude of forefoot deformities. This makes the condition more challenging as you must treat the associated deformities at the same time in order to achieve a good outcome.



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What You Can Learn From Nightmare Malpractice Cases

By Janice G. Roven, JD, LLM | 5689 reads | 0 comments

You may not be able to prevent a malpractice claim from ever being filed against you (there are a lot of folks out there looking for an easy payday). However, there are proactive steps you can take to safeguard and successfully defend your practice should a lawsuit be filed against you. Although there are basic theories of malpractice prevention, I have found it helpful to teach prevention by example.

Think Twice About Testifying Against Colleagues
Case One: I represented a podiatrist who was truly disturbed about being sued. When I met with him to discuss this matter, he informed me th



Feature »

How To Prescribe Orthotics For Runners

By Alona Kashanian, DPM | 12284 reads | 0 comments

Most competitive runners do not like being restricted in their regimens. As we all know, these patients are very anxious to resume their running activity. However, they do look to foot and ankle specialists for help in reducing the inflammation, preventing and/or recuperating from lower extremity injuries. In order to write effective orthotic prescriptions for these patients, be sure to pay attention to cast correction, materials and additional bells and whistles.
The ability of the orthosis to control abnormal or excessive motion of the foot is more dependent on the size of the device and th



Orthotics Q&A »

Modification Tips: Making Sure The Shoe Fits

7722 reads | 0 comments

You may prescribe orthotics for a variety of problems. However, the success or failure of treatment may depend on the type of shoes your patients wear along with the type of modifications which you make to the shoe. With this in mind, our expert panelists address the use of shoe modifications as an adjunct to care.

Q: What type of modifications do you use most often and how does this affect patient symptoms?
A:
Nicholas Sol, DPM, says he most commonly prescribes a double rocker sole. He says most of his colleagues have a supply of these soles in the form of their cast shoes and boo



Point-Counterpoint »

Bunions: Are Proximal Osteotomies Necessary?

By John McCord, DPM, and Mark Hofbauer, DPM | 11043 reads | 0 comments

Yes, if the procedure is done correctly, it is a valuable adjunct to bunion correction, says John McCord, DPM.

Who will ever forget the memorable autistic man played by Dustin Hoffman in the film Rain Man? My favorite scene was when he refused to fly on any airline but Quantas because that carrier had no history of accidents. I reflect on that scene when I talk with colleagues in podiatry who refuse to consider performing proximal osteotomies while correcting bunion deformities. Their logic makes as much sense as the Rain Man in that they will choose a head osteotomy even though it w



Feature »

Win The Battle Against Postoperative Infections

By Stacey Stefansky, DPM, Thanh L. Dinh, DPM, and Barry Rosenblum, DPM | 13068 reads | 0 comments

Despite advances in aseptic technique and antibiotic prophylaxis, post-operative infections remain a significant complication following podiatric surgery. Postoperative infections can increase morbidity, lengthen recuperation time and compromise the success of a surgical procedure. Data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that postoperative infections occur in 2.1 percent of all clean, uncontaminated surgical procedures.1
Studies pertaining specifically to podiatric surgery have produced comparable postoperative infection rates. Hugar, et. al., demonstr



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