Volume 15 - Issue 7 - July 2002

Feature »

A Comprehensive Review Of Topical Agents

By Jonathan Moore, DPM, MS, A. Patti Smith, MD, and John S. Steinberg, DPM | 15885 reads | 0 comments

The wound is in constant evolution. Changes arise and you need to be able to respond accordingly in your treatment course. Indeed, understanding the biochemical dynamics of wound healing is vital for proper product selection (see “Understanding The Phases Of Wound Healing” on page 42). The challenge to the practitioner is to have the knowledge base with which to sort through the thousands of topical agents and dressings available today.

Insights On Topical Agents With Collagen
Let’s start out with a discussion of the biologic topical agents that contain collagen. Collagen hastens wou



Feature »

How To Use VAC Therapy On Chronic Wounds

By Brian Short, DPM, Matthew Claxton, DPM, and David G. Armstrong, DPM | 37647 reads | 1 comments

Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous stasis ulcers and decubitis ulcers are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients and significantly contribute to health care costs.1-4 Wounds of these types often lead to complications such as infection and amputation.5-7 The ADA currently reports diabetes is prevalent in at least 17 million Americans, many of whom do not know they have the disease. Of these, approximately 15 percent will experience a foot ulcer or other complication requiring hospitalization during the course of the disease.8, 9
Similarly, venous wounds



Editor's Perspective »

Understanding The Changing Face Of Diabetes

By Jeff Hall, Editor-In-Chief | 2045 reads | 0 comments

New figures from the Centers For Disease Control (CDC) continue to cast a sobering view on treating diabetes in the years to come. Now there are 17 million Americans who have the disease and nearly six million of them are unaware they have the condition, according to CDC estimates. The prevalence of the disease, the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States, has increased 33 percent in the last decade. Even more troubling is the fact that the demographics of the diabetes population are growing wider.
The CDC notes that over a million new cases will be diagnosed each year among patien



New Products »

An “X”-Ceptional Wound Healer

2455 reads | 0 comments

Are you looking for a new advance to help promote quicker wound healing for your patients?
You may want to check out Xenaderm, a new prescription ointment unveiled by Healthpoint, Ltd. According to the company, Xenaderm stimulates the capillary bed, increasing circulation in the wound site. Using the ointment helps improve epithelialization by reducing premature epithelial desiccation. Healthpoint also notes that Xenaderm acts as a protective covering for the wound.
According to Healthpoint, using Xenaderm (available in 60-gram tubes) reduces the need to use multiple products since the



Diagnostic Dilemmas »

Identifying Skin Conditions Of Diabetic Patients

By Tamara D. Fishman, DPM | 5959 reads | 0 comments

Many people with diabetes develop skin manifestations as a result of having the disease. In some instances, such skin problems may be the first sign that the patient has diabetes. Proper recognition is the key to successful treatment, but making the proper diagnosis can be difficult. Some conditions may have similar characteristics and presentations. With this in mind, test your diagnostic acumen with the following case.
A 64-year-old female with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus came into the office with right and left leg ulcerations. The patient’s past medical history is significan



Forum »

The Night The Lights Went Out In The O.R.

By John McCord, DPM | 2612 reads | 0 comments

I graduated from podiatry school and went through residency in the mid-‘70s, about the same time power instruments were introduced to podiatric surgeons. We wore grounded booties and used noisy nitrogen-driven drills. When you walked past an O.R. with a foot case going, it sounded like a Black & Decker convention. We loved our power instruments.
The problem with these new tools was young podiatrists became totally dependent upon nitrogen- and later electrically-powered drills, saws and wire drivers. Hand tools like osteotomes and mallets were retired to hospital storage closets. The new bre