Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • July 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 7
    A 64-year-old female with NIDDM presented with right and left leg ulcerations (as shown above).
    By Tamara D. Fishman, DPM
    6,596 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    Many people with diabetes develop skin manifestations as a result of having the disease. In some instances, such skin problems may be the first sign that the patient has diabetes. Proper recognition is the key to successful treatment, but making the proper diagnosis can be difficult. Some conditions may have similar characteristics and presentations. With this in mind, test your diagnostic acumen with the following case. A 64-year-old female with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus came into the office with right and left leg ulcerations. The patient’s past medical history is significan... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-In-Chief
    2,405 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    New figures from the Centers For Disease Control (CDC) continue to cast a sobering view on treating diabetes in the years to come. Now there are 17 million Americans who have the disease and nearly six million of them are unaware they have the condition, according to CDC estimates. The prevalence of the disease, the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States, has increased 33 percent in the last decade. Even more troubling is the fact that the demographics of the diabetes population are growing wider. The CDC notes that over a million new cases will be diagnosed each year among patien ... continue reading
    Here you can see a pressure ulcer of nine months duration with eschar formation on the left heel. The patient has a history of prostate cancer and peripheral vascular disease. (Photo courtesy of Tamara Fishman, DPM.)

    58,967 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    Many leading researchers and wound care practitioners have shown that one of the most important elements in treating wounds is performing regular debridement of tissue (such as eschar) which interferes with wound healing. Timothy Shea, DPM, says the standard approach is to initially debride eschar (and other non-viable tissue) until you get down to good viable tissue and do subsequent debridement every seven to 10 days until you see good granulation tissue. But what about the presence of black eschar? According to Alexander Reyzelman, DPM, there is a bit of controversy over whether you should... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    2,998 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    I graduated from podiatry school and went through residency in the mid-‘70s, about the same time power instruments were introduced to podiatric surgeons. We wore grounded booties and used noisy nitrogen-driven drills. When you walked past an O.R. with a foot case going, it sounded like a Black & Decker convention. We loved our power instruments. The problem with these new tools was young podiatrists became totally dependent upon nitrogen- and later electrically-powered drills, saws and wire drivers. Hand tools like osteotomes and mallets were retired to hospital storage closets. The new bre... continue reading
    www.diabetesincontrol.com
Created by and for medical professionals, the site offers research updates from conferences and meetings, informative feature articles and continuing education opportunities. A free newsletter also features the most current updat
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    4,238 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    Paying malpractice insurance premiums is a necessary evil for doctors. Lately, however, both doctors and insurance companies have been feeling the crunch more than ever before. The entire country faces a “crisis” when it comes to medical malpractice coverage, although some states, like Pennsylvania and Texas, are hit particularly hard, according to PICA President and CEO Jerry Brant, DPM. “I’m fortunately busy enough that I can afford to do surgery,” says Stephen A. Monaco, DPM, who practices in suburban Philadelphia, an area with high insurance and settlement costs. He acknowledge... continue reading
    This portrays a typical venous stasis ulcer. Note the location—medial malleolar—and the associated hemosiderosis, dermatitis and brawny edema.
    By Richard M. Stillman, MD, FACS
    16,322 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    About four of 1,000 people will develop a leg ulcer during their lives, but the prevalence of leg ulcers rises dramatically with age, increasing to about 1 percent in people over the age of 60 and 2 percent in people over the age of 80. In the U.S., about 3 million people suffer from leg ulceration, costing an annual $4 billion in treatment costs and losses of over 2 million days from work. In general, diagnosing the cause of leg and foot wounds requires examining the wound, the extremity and the patient. Let’s start by taking a look at venous problems. Any disease state that leads to ven... continue reading