Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • July 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 7
    Camille Ryans
    4,397 reads | 0 comments | 07/26/02
       There is a tendency for people to fear the unknown. Unfortunately, stereotypes abound about the incapability of the podiatric profession. It is up to everyone involved in the field directly or indirectly not to perpetuate this way of thinking.    Bias towards podiatry is a double-edged sword. On one side, the laypeople are constantly questioning the profession. ... continue reading
    Here is a postoperative view of the fixation with the shortened second metatarsal.
    By Thomas Cusumano, DPM
    49,298 reads | 0 comments | 07/26/02
    Metatarsalgia may develop from osseous, neurological, vascular or dermal etiologies. The causes are numerous and commonly involve a cavus foot structure, a long second metatarsal, short first metatarsal, hypermobile first ray, iatrogenic pain from forefoot surgery or manifest from a rheumatology-induced systemic disease. When symptoms persist, you may see callus lesions develop under the affected metatarsal. Keep in mind that these lesions can lead to stress fractures and compensation-induced pains in the lower extremity and back. ... continue reading

    2,818 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    I read with great interest your recent editorial regarding HIPAA (see “Ready Or Not, Here Comes HIPAA,” page 14, April issue). As Vice-President of the APMA and Chair of the Health Policy Committee, I have direct oversight of these activities. We fully agree with the need for education regarding HIPAA and implementation of the final guidelines. The APMA is producing a HIPAA Compliance Manual that will be free to APMA members. However, after the March release of revisions to the proposed rule and final standards, we decided to delay production of the manual until 60 days after the final r ... continue reading
    By Patrick Agnew, DPM
    6,185 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    Is the term “overuse injuries” really appropriate? After all, many so-called “overuse” injuries of the lower extremity are unilateral. In most cases, the right foot is used just as much as the left foot so the term becomes illogical. Perhaps stress failure phenomena would be a more accurate description of these injuries. Some examples of mechanisms leading to stress failure problems include repetitive motion, repetitive loading and repetitive impact. Your patients might encounter repetitive motion injuries in endurance sports like swimming or sports such as cross-country running or b ... continue reading
    Candela’s C-Beam laser offers the latest treatment of psoriatic plaque and plantar verruca.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    3,328 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    Podiatrists looking for new ways of treating plantar verruca may want to check out a new advance in laser treatments. The C-beam is a laser that penetrates below the epidermal surface to get to the root of plantar and palmar psoriasis. Frank Russo, DPM, has been using the C-beam for several weeks to treat plantar warts and other ailments and says it’s the “newest and best thing going.” “(The C-Beam) is easy to use for us and the patients have been really receptive to it," says Dr. Russo. "If I had a plantar wart, this is how I would treat it.” Dr. Russo says the C-beam is differe... continue reading
    Here you can see a status post open first ray amputation. Panafil treatment has been initiated.
    By Jonathan Moore, DPM, MS, A. Patti Smith, MD, and John S. Steinberg, DPM
    17,838 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    The wound is in constant evolution. Changes arise and you need to be able to respond accordingly in your treatment course. Indeed, understanding the biochemical dynamics of wound healing is vital for proper product selection (see “Understanding The Phases Of Wound Healing” on page 42). The challenge to the practitioner is to have the knowledge base with which to sort through the thousands of topical agents and dressings available today. Insights On Topical Agents With Collagen Let’s start out with a discussion of the biologic topical agents that contain collagen. Collagen hastens wou... continue reading
    New from KCI, the VAC Advanced Therapy System is the latest model to help heal wounds.

    2,908 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    Are you looking for a new advance to help promote quicker wound healing for your patients? You may want to check out Xenaderm, a new prescription ointment unveiled by Healthpoint, Ltd. According to the company, Xenaderm stimulates the capillary bed, increasing circulation in the wound site. Using the ointment helps improve epithelialization by reducing premature epithelial desiccation. Healthpoint also notes that Xenaderm acts as a protective covering for the wound. According to Healthpoint, using Xenaderm (available in 60-gram tubes) reduces the need to use multiple products since the ... continue reading
    Here you can see a large, complex diabetic foot wound after emergent intraoperative debridement.
    By Brian Short, DPM, Matthew Claxton, DPM, and David G. Armstrong, DPM
    41,727 reads | 1 comments | 07/03/02
    Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous stasis ulcers and decubitis ulcers are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients and significantly contribute to health care costs.1-4 Wounds of these types often lead to complications such as infection and amputation.5-7 The ADA currently reports diabetes is prevalent in at least 17 million Americans, many of whom do not know they have the disease. Of these, approximately 15 percent will experience a foot ulcer or other complication requiring hospitalization during the course of the disease.8, 9 Similarly, venous wounds... continue reading
    A 64-year-old female with NIDDM presented with right and left leg ulcerations (as shown above).
    By Tamara D. Fishman, DPM
    6,625 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    Many people with diabetes develop skin manifestations as a result of having the disease. In some instances, such skin problems may be the first sign that the patient has diabetes. Proper recognition is the key to successful treatment, but making the proper diagnosis can be difficult. Some conditions may have similar characteristics and presentations. With this in mind, test your diagnostic acumen with the following case. A 64-year-old female with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus came into the office with right and left leg ulcerations. The patient’s past medical history is significan... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-In-Chief
    2,425 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    New figures from the Centers For Disease Control (CDC) continue to cast a sobering view on treating diabetes in the years to come. Now there are 17 million Americans who have the disease and nearly six million of them are unaware they have the condition, according to CDC estimates. The prevalence of the disease, the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States, has increased 33 percent in the last decade. Even more troubling is the fact that the demographics of the diabetes population are growing wider. The CDC notes that over a million new cases will be diagnosed each year among patien ... continue reading