Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • July 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 7
    Here is a postoperative view of the fixation with the shortened second metatarsal.
    By Thomas Cusumano, DPM
    45,382 reads | 0 comments | 07/26/02
    Metatarsalgia may develop from osseous, neurological, vascular or dermal etiologies. The causes are numerous and commonly involve a cavus foot structure, a long second metatarsal, short first metatarsal, hypermobile first ray, iatrogenic pain from forefoot surgery or manifest from a rheumatology-induced systemic disease. When symptoms persist, you may see callus lesions develop under the affected metatarsal. Keep in mind that these lesions can lead to stress fractures and compensation-induced pains in the lower extremity and back. ... continue reading
    Camille Ryans
    3,755 reads | 0 comments | 07/26/02
       There is a tendency for people to fear the unknown. Unfortunately, stereotypes abound about the incapability of the podiatric profession. It is up to everyone involved in the field directly or indirectly not to perpetuate this way of thinking.    Bias towards podiatry is a double-edged sword. On one side, the laypeople are constantly questioning the profession. ... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    2,717 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    I graduated from podiatry school and went through residency in the mid-‘70s, about the same time power instruments were introduced to podiatric surgeons. We wore grounded booties and used noisy nitrogen-driven drills. When you walked past an O.R. with a foot case going, it sounded like a Black & Decker convention. We loved our power instruments. The problem with these new tools was young podiatrists became totally dependent upon nitrogen- and later electrically-powered drills, saws and wire drivers. Hand tools like osteotomes and mallets were retired to hospital storage closets. The new bre... continue reading
    www.diabetesincontrol.com
Created by and for medical professionals, the site offers research updates from conferences and meetings, informative feature articles and continuing education opportunities. A free newsletter also features the most current updat
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    3,895 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    Paying malpractice insurance premiums is a necessary evil for doctors. Lately, however, both doctors and insurance companies have been feeling the crunch more than ever before. The entire country faces a “crisis” when it comes to medical malpractice coverage, although some states, like Pennsylvania and Texas, are hit particularly hard, according to PICA President and CEO Jerry Brant, DPM. “I’m fortunately busy enough that I can afford to do surgery,” says Stephen A. Monaco, DPM, who practices in suburban Philadelphia, an area with high insurance and settlement costs. He acknowledge... continue reading
    This portrays a typical venous stasis ulcer. Note the location—medial malleolar—and the associated hemosiderosis, dermatitis and brawny edema.
    By Richard M. Stillman, MD, FACS
    15,104 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    About four of 1,000 people will develop a leg ulcer during their lives, but the prevalence of leg ulcers rises dramatically with age, increasing to about 1 percent in people over the age of 60 and 2 percent in people over the age of 80. In the U.S., about 3 million people suffer from leg ulceration, costing an annual $4 billion in treatment costs and losses of over 2 million days from work. In general, diagnosing the cause of leg and foot wounds requires examining the wound, the extremity and the patient. Let’s start by taking a look at venous problems. Any disease state that leads to ven... continue reading

    1,581 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    By Robert Smith
    8,158 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    Unfortunately, it doesn’t always work out and the staffer you thought to be perfect for your team winds up bringing down your practice in some significant way. It is when you recognize that you must fire the employee that the real work of managing your office truly begins. Indeed, with the increasingly litigious nature of our era, firing staffers has become a problematic process, fraught with many legal and ethical landmines. “We all know how to terminate someone,” notes Hal Ornstein, DPM, who has a private practice in Howell, N.J. “It’s not hard to say ‘You’re fired.’ The id ... continue reading

    2,569 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    I read with great interest your recent editorial regarding HIPAA (see “Ready Or Not, Here Comes HIPAA,” page 14, April issue). As Vice-President of the APMA and Chair of the Health Policy Committee, I have direct oversight of these activities. We fully agree with the need for education regarding HIPAA and implementation of the final guidelines. The APMA is producing a HIPAA Compliance Manual that will be free to APMA members. However, after the March release of revisions to the proposed rule and final standards, we decided to delay production of the manual until 60 days after the final r ... continue reading
    By Patrick Agnew, DPM
    5,609 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    Is the term “overuse injuries” really appropriate? After all, many so-called “overuse” injuries of the lower extremity are unilateral. In most cases, the right foot is used just as much as the left foot so the term becomes illogical. Perhaps stress failure phenomena would be a more accurate description of these injuries. Some examples of mechanisms leading to stress failure problems include repetitive motion, repetitive loading and repetitive impact. Your patients might encounter repetitive motion injuries in endurance sports like swimming or sports such as cross-country running or b ... continue reading
    Candela’s C-Beam laser offers the latest treatment of psoriatic plaque and plantar verruca.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    3,038 reads | 0 comments | 07/03/02
    Podiatrists looking for new ways of treating plantar verruca may want to check out a new advance in laser treatments. The C-beam is a laser that penetrates below the epidermal surface to get to the root of plantar and palmar psoriasis. Frank Russo, DPM, has been using the C-beam for several weeks to treat plantar warts and other ailments and says it’s the “newest and best thing going.” “(The C-Beam) is easy to use for us and the patients have been really receptive to it," says Dr. Russo. "If I had a plantar wart, this is how I would treat it.” Dr. Russo says the C-beam is differe... continue reading