Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • May 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 5
    By Megan Lawton
    4,425 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I have always loved sports and knew I wanted to be able to treat athletes’ anomalies medically. I participated in many sports up through college. Whether I was playing volleyball, fastpitch games or doing a triathlon, I found that athlete anomalies typically involved the foot and ankle. I found the podiatry profession fit my life. Not only could I treat athletes and others, I could incorporate surgery into some treatments. After I decided to pursue podiatry as a career, I started thinking about my future. I’m not alone. As the podiatric profession continues to evolve, students often wond... continue reading
    Here you can see exposure of the periosteum overlying the distal medial tibia. The author says you should avoid inadvertent posterior dissection.
    By Jesse Burks, DPM, MS
    9,506 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Numerous primary and revisional surgical procedures mandate using either osseous autografts or allografts. Although allografts continue to increase in popularity, most podiatric surgeons will agree that autografts offer distinct advantages in healing and are preferable when possible. In comparison to autogenous grafts, allografts help facilitate an absence of donor site morbidity, unlimited supply and decreased surgical time. However, autografts provide numerous benefits such as host compatibility, viable precursor cells and superior immunologic properties.1,2 As with any surgical procedure... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    7,441 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    What is the best treatment approach for seniors who have painful arthritis in the first MPJ? Arthrodesis may provide significant pain relief for these patients, according to the results of a recent 29-patient study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS). A retrospective analysis revealed that 100 percent of 19 patients who responded to a survey said they were satisfied with the results of the arthrodesis, which involves fusing arthritic bones to inhibit motion and eliminate the arthritis. These patients also noted they would undergo the proc... continue reading