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  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • May 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 5
    
According to Dr. Barrett (shown at right), more than 500,000 EPF procedures have been performed since the procedure received FDA approval in 1992.
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM
    46,982 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    Prior to the development of the first endoscopic foot surgery, there was a strong desire not only to find a better, less invasive method to treat recalcitrant mechanical plantar fasciitis surgically but also to develop a more universally consistent surgical approach to what has been labeled an “endemic problem.” Indeed, the standard of care regarding the surgical management of the heel pain has radically changed since the introduction of the endoscopic plantar fasciotomy (EPF). In 1990, there was an almost universal perception within the podiatric community that the spur was the primary c... continue reading

    4,067 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    Are you trying to get a more accurate handle on a patient’s diabetic neuropathy? If so, you may want to check out the SmartPen dual filament sensor from Koven Technology. It says the SmartPen combines a sterile sharp tip sensor and a replaceable, calibrated, retractable Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. According to Koven, the sterile sensor enables you to test for sharp sensations in areas near diabetic foot ulcers. Using the 10gm monofilament helps you assess diabetic neuropathy assessment with touch-pressure sensation and is calibrated for 100 uses, according to the company. Koven adds tha ... continue reading
    By Megan Lawton
    4,827 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    I have always loved sports and knew I wanted to be able to treat athletes’ anomalies medically. I participated in many sports up through college. Whether I was playing volleyball, fastpitch games or doing a triathlon, I found that athlete anomalies typically involved the foot and ankle. I found the podiatry profession fit my life. Not only could I treat athletes and others, I could incorporate surgery into some treatments. After I decided to pursue podiatry as a career, I started thinking about my future. I’m not alone. As the podiatric profession continues to evolve, students often wond... continue reading