Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • May 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 5
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    7,464 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    What is the best treatment approach for seniors who have painful arthritis in the first MPJ? Arthrodesis may provide significant pain relief for these patients, according to the results of a recent 29-patient study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS). A retrospective analysis revealed that 100 percent of 19 patients who responded to a survey said they were satisfied with the results of the arthrodesis, which involves fusing arthritic bones to inhibit motion and eliminate the arthritis. These patients also noted they would undergo the proc... continue reading
    Panelists: Warren Joseph, DPM, Aditya Gupta, MD, PhD, Benjamin Overley, DPM, Richard Pollak, DPM and Jack Rubinlicht, DPM
    21,205 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Should you use a topical, an oral therapy or a combination of both? This is one of many questions that came up during an intriguing discussion of antifungals. Drawing upon their clinical experience, the panelists discuss their approaches to treating tinea pedis and onychomycosis, indications and contraindications for oral drugs, and other important aspects of prescribing appropriate, effective therapy. Q: What do you use to treat different presentations of tinea pedis, including moccasin variety, acute vesicular and dermatophytosis complex (severe interdigital tinea)? Warren Joseph,... continue reading
    When testing the deep posterior compartment with the Stryker intra-compartmental pressure monitor system, insert the needle just medial and posterior, staying relatively superficial within the posterior tibial muscle belly.
    By Richard Braver, DPM
    43,585 reads | 2 comments | 09/03/08
    When patients experience intense pain, a burning sensation, tightness and/or numbness in the lower extremities during exercise activity, and the pain usually resolves quickly once the patients stop the activity, you may be looking at exertional compartment syndrome (ECS). ECS is certainly one of the more confounding conditions as differentiating between the various leg pains can be difficult. Parasthesia to the anterior leg, ankle or between the first and second metatarsal is indicative of anterior leg compartment involvement. In addition, weakness of ankle dorsiflexion or a drop foot also in... continue reading