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  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • May 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 5
    When testing the deep posterior compartment with the Stryker intra-compartmental pressure monitor system, insert the needle just medial and posterior, staying relatively superficial within the posterior tibial muscle belly.
    By Richard Braver, DPM
    44,619 reads | 2 comments | 05/03/02
    When patients experience intense pain, a burning sensation, tightness and/or numbness in the lower extremities during exercise activity, and the pain usually resolves quickly once the patients stop the activity, you may be looking at exertional compartment syndrome (ECS). ECS is certainly one of the more confounding conditions as differentiating between the various leg pains can be difficult. Parasthesia to the anterior leg, ankle or between the first and second metatarsal is indicative of anterior leg compartment involvement. In addition, weakness of ankle dorsiflexion or a drop foot also in... continue reading
    By Anthony Yung, DPM
    10,153 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    At least 30 percent of patients with diabetes will develop cutaneous manifestations in their lifetime.1 Given that diabetes is a systemic disease, its effects on the skin may arise from many different sources (vascular, metabolic, nutritional disturbances, infectious agents and medications). Several common skin disorders may be associated with diabetes. These include necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, granuloma annulare, diabetic bullae, diabetic dermopathy, limited joint mobility and yellow skin phenomenon. While the exact causes of most pathologic skin changes are unknown, a majority of t... continue reading

    17,726 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/02
    Many patients with non-healing ulcers are already in significant pain prior to surgery. Many of these patients will require escalating doses of pain medications following surgical debridement and grafting. Some will already have developed tolerances to pain medications. So, what do we prescribe to control their pain? More importantly, what can we prescribe and still maintain a level of comfort in writing the prescription? With these questions in mind, Robert Snyder, DPM, engaged in a Q&A session with Andrew J. Goldberg, MD, the Director of the Northwest Pain Management Center in Margate, Fla... continue reading