Volume 21 - Issue 5 - May 2008

Continuing Education »

Tarsal Coalition And Pes Planus: What Is The Best Treatment Option?

Jesse B. Burks, DPM, FACFAS | 3496 reads | 0 comments

Please click here for the full Continuing Medical Education article:

http://www.naccme.com/program/n-212/

Given the challenges inherent in diagnosing and treating tarsal coalitions, this author reviews key clinical findings, offers keys to diagnostic imaging, explores the merits of conservative therapy and discusses indications for resection and arthrodesis.



Diabetes Watch »

Key Insights On Assessing The Risk Factors For PAD

Anthony Yung, DPM, and Khurram Khan, DPM | 5992 reads | 0 comments

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a significant risk factor for diabetic foot amputation. It is also an important marker for atherosclerosis in other organ systems and is associated with a fourfold increase in cardiovascular death.1
Current estimates suggest a 3 to 10 percent incidence of PAD in the general population but reportedly only 25 to 33 percent of these people are symptomatic. Of the patients with asymptomatic PAD, 70 to 80 percent will remain stable at five years whereas 10 to 20 percent will experience significant deterioration of their health due to t



Feature »

Essential Insights On First MPJ Implant Revision

Lara J. Murphy, DPM, Robert W. Mendicino, DPM, FACFAS, and Alan Catanzariti, DPM, FACFAS | 18861 reads | 0 comments

Implants have been documented in the literature and surgeons have utilized implants over the past 50 years for the treatment of a variety of conditions including hallux rigidus, hallux valgus, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.1,2 Total joints were originally designed to function as joint spacers to decrease pain while maintaining motion and joint alignment.1,3 Currently, a variety of products attempt to provide these characteristics. These products include silastic, polyethylene-on-metal and metal hemiarthroplasty implants. Surgeons have implanted over 2



Forum »

What I Will Miss (And What I Will Not Miss) About Podiatry

John H. McCord, DPM | 1805 reads | 0 comments

I am in the last nine months of my 33-year career as a podiatrist. Every day of patient care is a cause for reflection. I know what I will miss and what I will not miss.
I will not miss my most creative patients, those who are pursuing settlement of personal injury claims. Some have been legitimate but many have been pure fiction.
My most memorable creative patient was a young man who lost his second toe in an industrial accident. He got his foot caught in a chain and sprocket, and lost the toe. I cleaned up the mess and he healed without problems. I received a request for his r



Feature »

How To Prevent Postoperative Infection

Nicholas J. Bevilacqua, DPM, and Robert M. Greenhagen, BS | 10772 reads | 0 comments

Postoperative infection following elective, clean foot and ankle surgery is relatively uncommon. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports the surgical site infection (SSI) rate to be 2.1 percent for clean, uncontaminated surgery.1 However, when postoperative infection does occur, it may affect functional outcomes and the patient’s quality of life.
The incidence of infection varies from one surgical procedure to another and from patient to patient.2 Infection rates increase in complicated reconstructive surgery, types of diabetic f



News and Trends »

Study Sparks Debate About Treatment Options For Ingrown Toenails

Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor | 10134 reads | 0 comments

Patients commonly present with ingrown toenails and treatments range from chemical matrixectomy to the newer orthonyxia procedure. A new study in the Journal of the American College of Surgery concludes that orthonyxia, using a metal brace for the toe, is superior to partial matrix excision in terms of recovery and patient satisfaction.
Researchers randomized 105 consecutive patients with 109 toenails, excluding patients with diabetes and/or paronychias. Fifty-eight patients underwent partial matrix excision, which included 5 to 10 mL of lidocaine 1%, according to th



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