Volume 21 - Issue 3 - March 2008

New Products »

A Unique Dressing

4334 reads | 0 comments

A Unique Dressing

A new dressing attacks wounds from more than one angle.
Biostep Ag Collagen Matrix Dressings use a unique dual-action approach to target and deactivate excess matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), according to the manufacturer Smith and Nephew Wound Management.
The company says the dressings also use the antimicrobial effects of silver to minimize the chance of infection.
Smith and Nephew says Biostep has a six-day wear time and is more absorbent than other dressings.



News and Trends »

Researchers Offer Closer Look At Complications In Patients With Diabetes

Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor | 4553 reads | 0 comments


Two abstracts, which will be presented at the upcoming Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC), seek to address the impact of dialysis upon diabetic wound healing and the long-term mortality rates of those who undergo non-traumatic amputation.
For the one abstract’s retrospective review, researchers evaluated 150 patients with diabetes on hemodialysis. These patients had 30 months of follow-up for foot ulcers, infections, amputations and death. The abstract authors sought to determine if the patients received “standard preventative care” consistent with patien



Surgical Pearls »

How To Address Ganglionic Cysts In The Tarsal Tunnel

Dina Stock, DPM, Cory Baxter, DPM, James Sferra, MD, Christopher Herbert, DPM, and Elizabeth Baracz, BS | 22667 reads | 0 comments

Tarsal tunnel syndrome is an entrapment of the posterior tibial nerve or its branches within the tarsal tunnel.1 This syndrome is most frequently unilateral as opposed to carpal tunnel syndrome in the upper extremity, which is typically bilateral.2 Keck and Lam first described the term “tarsal tunnel syndrome” in 1962.3,4
Malaisé first described the clinical signs and symptoms of tarsal tunnel syndrome in 1918. Some of the symptoms include numbness or tingling in the soles of the feet and toes or a burning pain in the ankles.



Technology In Practice »

Grooved Surface Of RFS Pin May Facilitate Improved Internal Fixation

Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor | 3271 reads | 0 comments

For podiatric surgeons who are looking for new additions to their internal fixation armamentarium, the NexFix RFS (Resorbable Fixation System) Pin may be a viable option.
The NexFix RFS Fin offers a combination of self-locking technology and a patented grooved surface design. Tornier, the manufacturer of the product, says the RFS Pin provides enhanced rotational stability, improved flexibility to accommodate different drill hole sizes and channels for potential vascularization.
Charles Zelen, DPM, notes he has had success using the NexFix RFS Pin for various osteotomies.
&



Treatment Dilemmas »

Inside Insights On Ankle Replacement Surgery

Bob Baravarian, DPM | 10834 reads | 0 comments

Ankle arthritis has been the subject of much research and researchers have made a great deal of progress in this area in the past 50 years. In the past, physicians primarily treated post-traumatic arthritis, which accounts for much of the cause of ankle arthritis, with casting. This often caused malalignment and poor articular position, resulting in rapid arthritis of the hindfoot and ankle.
With the advent of internal fixation and external fixation advances, proper anatomic alignment of the hindfoot and ankle has resulted in a dramatic decrease in the rate of post-traumatic ar



Wound Care Q&A »

Examining The Evidence For Preventing Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 15850 reads | 0 comments

When it comes to patients with diabetes and lower extremity ulcers and complications, what does the evidence-based medicine say about high-risk patients and proactive prevention? These panelists examine risk factors for ulcerations, appropriate screening and offer their thoughts on what works and what does not work in terms of prevention.

Q: What does evidence-based medicine show in regard to who is at risk for limb loss and foot ulcerations?
A: Thomas Zgonis, DPM, says approximately 15 percent of patients with diabetes will experience a