Volume 21 - Issue 3 - March 2008

Technology In Practice »

Grooved Surface Of RFS Pin May Facilitate Improved Internal Fixation

Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor | 3125 reads | 0 comments

For podiatric surgeons who are looking for new additions to their internal fixation armamentarium, the NexFix RFS (Resorbable Fixation System) Pin may be a viable option.
The NexFix RFS Fin offers a combination of self-locking technology and a patented grooved surface design. Tornier, the manufacturer of the product, says the RFS Pin provides enhanced rotational stability, improved flexibility to accommodate different drill hole sizes and channels for potential vascularization.
Charles Zelen, DPM, notes he has had success using the NexFix RFS Pin for various osteotomies.
&



Treatment Dilemmas »

Inside Insights On Ankle Replacement Surgery

Bob Baravarian, DPM | 10358 reads | 0 comments

Ankle arthritis has been the subject of much research and researchers have made a great deal of progress in this area in the past 50 years. In the past, physicians primarily treated post-traumatic arthritis, which accounts for much of the cause of ankle arthritis, with casting. This often caused malalignment and poor articular position, resulting in rapid arthritis of the hindfoot and ankle.
With the advent of internal fixation and external fixation advances, proper anatomic alignment of the hindfoot and ankle has resulted in a dramatic decrease in the rate of post-traumatic ar



Wound Care Q&A »

Examining The Evidence For Preventing Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 14738 reads | 0 comments

When it comes to patients with diabetes and lower extremity ulcers and complications, what does the evidence-based medicine say about high-risk patients and proactive prevention? These panelists examine risk factors for ulcerations, appropriate screening and offer their thoughts on what works and what does not work in terms of prevention.

Q: What does evidence-based medicine show in regard to who is at risk for limb loss and foot ulcerations?
A: Thomas Zgonis, DPM, says approximately 15 percent of patients with diabetes will experience a



Feature » MRSA

How To Recognize And Treat Community-Acquired MRSA

Guy Pupp, DPM, FACFAS, and Carmen B. April, DPM | 25137 reads | 0 comments

In the past few months, we have heard numerous reports in the news about a “new super bug” that is resistant to conventional antibiotics and is sweeping through high school sports locker rooms and classrooms. The alleged new super bug is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and, more specifically, community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA).
However, MRSA is not a new type of bacteria that has suddenly appeared in the community. The organism has actually been around for quite a few decades.
In 1941, all S. aureus isolates were suscept



Continuing Education »

Pertinent Pearls On Grading Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Ronald A. Sage, DPM | 16343 reads | 0 comments

Please click here for the full Continuing Medical Education article:

http://www.naccme.com/program/n-234/

Given that ulcers are a common complication for patients with diabetes, it is important to understand the various ulcer grading systems and how they can aid in treatment. This author reviews common classification systems and how to apply them in a clinical setting.



Feature »

Preventing Amputation In Patients With Diabetes

Lee C. Rogers, DPM | 10041 reads | 0 comments

The World Health Organization and the International Diabetes Federation have stated that up to 85 percent of diabetic lower extremity amputations are preventable. There are approximately 82,000 diabetes-related lower extremity amputations (LEA) annually at an estimated cost of over $11 billion.1,2 Eighty-five percent of amputations are preceded by a foot ulcer.3 Diabetic foot ulcers are caused by neuropathy, deformity and repetitive microtrauma.4 The treatment of diabetic foot ulcers may cost the United States healthcare system as much as $19 billion



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