Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • March 2008 | Volume 21 - Issue 3
    Here one can see a community-acquired MRSA infection in a college athlete with excoriation. Repeated close physical contacts and skin injuries such as cuts and abrasions put athletes at an increased risk for CA-MRSA infections.
    Guy Pupp, DPM, FACFAS, and Carmen B. April, DPM
    28,355 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/08
    In the past few months, we have heard numerous reports in the news about a “new super bug” that is resistant to conventional antibiotics and is sweeping through high school sports locker rooms and classrooms. The alleged new super bug is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and, more specifically, community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). However, MRSA is not a new type of bacteria that has suddenly appeared in the community. The organism has actually been around for quite a few decades. In 1941, all S. aureus isolates were suscept ... continue reading
    Keywords:

    4,841 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/08
    A Unique Dressing A new dressing attacks wounds from more than one angle. Biostep™ Ag Collagen Matrix Dressings use a unique dual-action approach to target and deactivate excess matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), according to the manufacturer Smith and Nephew Wound Management. The company says the dressings also use the antimicrobial effects of silver to minimize the chance of infection. Smith and Nephew says Biostep has a six-day wear time and is more absorbent than other dressings. ... continue reading
    Ronald A. Sage, DPM
    17,117 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/08
    A diabetic patient on dialysis presented with a non-healing great toe wound with exposed bone. A study submitted to the SAWC found a 19.5 annual incidence of ulceration in diabetic patients on hemodialysis.
    Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    5,236 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/08
      Two abstracts, which will be presented at the upcoming Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC), seek to address the impact of dialysis upon diabetic wound healing and the long-term mortality rates of those who undergo non-traumatic amputation. For the one abstract’s retrospective review, researchers evaluated 150 patients with diabetes on hemodialysis. These patients had 30 months of follow-up for foot ulcers, infections, amputations and death. The abstract authors sought to determine if the patients received “standard preventative care” consistent with patien   ... continue reading
    Here one can see a hallux ulcer in a foot with hallux limitus. The ulcer healed in two months after surgeons performed a Keller arthroplasty to reduce the plantar pressure.
    Lee C. Rogers, DPM
    12,965 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/08
    The World Health Organization and the International Diabetes Federation have stated that up to 85 percent of diabetic lower extremity amputations are preventable. There are approximately 82,000 diabetes-related lower extremity amputations (LEA) annually at an estimated cost of over $11 billion.1,2 Eighty-five percent of amputations are preceded by a foot ulcer.3 Diabetic foot ulcers are caused by neuropathy, deformity and repetitive microtrauma.4 The treatment of diabetic foot ulcers may cost the United States healthcare system as much as $19 billion ... continue reading
    This MRI is of a 48-year-old patient who presented complaining of numbness in the ball of his right foot. He said he had more pain with rest than with activity.
    Dina Stock, DPM, Cory Baxter, DPM, James Sferra, MD, Christopher Herbert, DPM, and Elizabeth Baracz, BS
    26,924 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/08
    Tarsal tunnel syndrome is an entrapment of the posterior tibial nerve or its branches within the tarsal tunnel.1 This syndrome is most frequently unilateral as opposed to carpal tunnel syndrome in the upper extremity, which is typically bilateral.2 Keck and Lam first described the term “tarsal tunnel syndrome” in 1962.3,4 Malaisé first described the clinical signs and symptoms of tarsal tunnel syndrome in 1918. Some of the symptoms include numbness or tingling in the soles of the feet and toes or a burning pain in the ankles. ... continue reading
    Babak Baravarian, DPM
    19,892 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/08
    The treatment of patients with diabetes and associated complications has been extensively studied. Over the past several decades, the treatment of foot and ankle ailments in patients with diabetes has dramatically shifted from conservative measures of “do not perform surgery” to the present day thinking that has taught us that diabetic feet are not very different from normal feet. The most common misconception with diabetic foot ailments has been that the loss of limbs is due to severe vascular problems. However, with time, we have found that vascular issues in the ... continue reading
    The NexFix RFS Pins offer a combination of self-locking technology and a patented, grooved surface design. Gary Lepow, DPM, says he has used the pins for a variety of osteotomy procedures and has had no complications to date.
    Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor
    3,594 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/08
    For podiatric surgeons who are looking for new additions to their internal fixation armamentarium, the NexFix RFS (Resorbable Fixation System) Pin may be a viable option. The NexFix RFS Fin offers a combination of self-locking technology and a patented grooved surface design. Tornier, the manufacturer of the product, says the RFS Pin provides enhanced rotational stability, improved flexibility to accommodate different drill hole sizes and channels for potential vascularization. Charles Zelen, DPM, notes he has had success using the NexFix RFS Pin for various osteotomies. & ... continue reading
    Depressed patients have poorer adherence to diabetes treatment regimens. Depression is clinically important because it is associated with higher rates of mortality in patients with diabetes.
    James Wrobel, DPM
    9,094 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/08
    When it comes to patients with diabetes, the important roles of depression and distress have received more attention in the literature within the past year.1-6 While these topics are typically off our radar screens, having a stronger understanding of these connections can enable podiatric physicians to make meaningful differences in our patients’ lives. We care for patients in transitional health states across the continuum of care when these problems are more likely to surface. We also have more frequent contacts that can make us more sensitive and responsive to subt ... continue reading
    Bob Baravarian, DPM
    11,887 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/08
    Ankle arthritis has been the subject of much research and researchers have made a great deal of progress in this area in the past 50 years. In the past, physicians primarily treated post-traumatic arthritis, which accounts for much of the cause of ankle arthritis, with casting. This often caused malalignment and poor articular position, resulting in rapid arthritis of the hindfoot and ankle. With the advent of internal fixation and external fixation advances, proper anatomic alignment of the hindfoot and ankle has resulted in a dramatic decrease in the rate of post-traumatic ar ... continue reading