Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • January 2008 | Volume 21 - Issue 1
    By Francis Rottier, DPM
    32,359 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         Soft tissue neoplasms of the lower extremity present a significant treatment challenge to the treating physician. Although most neoplasms of the lower extremity prove to be benign, the potential for malignancy does exist. The ability to appropriately diagnose and treat soft tissue neoplasms may be the difference between life and death for the patient presenting with a soft tissue tumor of the lower extremity.      Accordingly, let us take a closer look at appropriate evaluation and diagnostic techniques that will aid the physician in making an accurate dia... continue reading
    By Kshitij Shankhdhar, MBBS, Dip. Diab.
    2,216 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         Would you believe that many centuries ago, it was a tradition in India that when a person used to visit someone, the host used to wash the feet of the guest to welcome him or her? Washing the feet of the guest was a gesture to express affection, respect and thankfulness for taking the pains of walking all the way.      Many centuries ago, there were two childhood friends called Sudama and Krishna. They used to study together in Gurukul (an Indian village school). As time passed, they grew up and settled in different places and could not meet for many yea... continue reading
    This photo shows metatarsophalangeal instability with multi-plane digital deformity.
    By Michael Salcedo, DPM, and Michael Motyer, DPM
    19,266 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         During the past five years, there has been a large influx of non-traditional bone screws on the orthopedic market for small bone fixation of the foot. Some of these designs have been effective at providing long-term surgical fracture stability with reduced osteotomy fixation morbidity. Additionally, these bone screw designs have found their way into a variety of applications in hindfoot surgery with headless screws, locking plate screws and cannulated self-tapping screws.      When trying to assess the technology available in small fragment fixation, it ... continue reading
    Here one can see gauntlet orthoses. The custom AFO has a plastic shell between layers of leather.
    By Lawrence Huppin, DPM
    24,882 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         Foot orthoses (FOs) have been a standard treatment in podiatric clinics for decades. Until a decade ago, however, it was rare for American podiatrists to dispense ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) of any kind.      In 1996, the Richie Brace was introduced and it was the first ankle brace to incorporate a custom functional foot orthosis (FFO). Two years later, the Arizona Brace, the first gauntlet AFO to incorporate a polypropylene shell, arrived on the market and was soon widely used within the podiatric profession. ... continue reading
    By Robert G. Smith, DPM, MSc, RPh, CPed
    14,053 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to be a major health problem worldwide. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has estimated that approximately 40,000 people in the United States become infected with HIV each year.1 Human immunodeficiency virus infection and severe HIV-related disease have become leading causes of illness and death in the U.S. The cumulative estimated number of diagnoses of AIDS through 2005 in the United States and dependent areas was 988,376.2 ... continue reading
    This CT scan depicts a navicular stress fracture. A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine examines a possible link between CT scans and an increased risk of cancer. (Photo courtesy of Brian Fullem, DPM)
    By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor
    9,800 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         Physicians reportedly obtain over 60 million computed tomography (CT) scans each year in the United States. However, a recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) suggests that CT scans may be linked to an increased risk of radiation exposure and cancer.      Citing evidence from epidemiologic studies, the authors of the NEJM article indicate that organ doses from a common CT study, consisting of two or three scans, may result in an increased risk of cancer.       “As compared with plain film radiography, CT invo... continue reading
    By David Levine, DPM, CPed
    1,961 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    This photo reveals a preoperative photograph of a diabetic foot infection. Three common points of origin for infection are submetatarsal ulcerations, interdigital infections and direct foreign body penetrations. (Photo courtesy of Warren Joseph, DPM)
    By Andy Meyr, DPM
    13,883 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         Dedicating oneself to the side of limb salvage in the fight against diabetic foot disease is a demanding and personally challenging enterprise. In the face of infection, it often seems as though all variables are against the surgeon and the patient as they both struggle against the possibilities of proximal amputation and limb loss. In fact, it often appears as though the only constant is the unpredictability of the disease progression.      However, expert knowledge in lower extremity anatomy is one of the most valuable tools that one can have in this fi... continue reading
    Here one can see preoperative degenerative changes of the first  metatarsophalangeal joint in a patient who did not want a fusion procedure.
    By Bob Baravarian, DPM, and Jonathon Thompson, DPM
    13,348 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         Hallux limitus occurs when a patient has decreased sagittal plane dorsiflexion of the great toe with the foot in a weightbearing or simulated weightbearing loaded position that is usually associated with a progressive, arthritic and painful condition of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ).      Functional hallux limitus is described as limited joint mobility with the foot in a loaded position versus normal range of motion in an unloaded position. Hallux rigidus can be defined as elimination of range of motion at the joint, and usually results from e... continue reading
    Here is a chronic midfoot ulceration that resulted from a Charcot deformity. David Armstrong, DPM, PhD, has found that about 80 percent of those wounds associated with Charcot arthropathy are in the midfoot. (Photo courtesy of Pamela Jensen, DPM)
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    15,206 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
         Treating a wound on a Charcot foot can be a challenge. Our expert panelists discuss the diagnosis of acute Charcot, the management of Charcot and Charcot-related wounds, indications for exostectomy and keys to facilitating a return to weightbearing.      Q: How do you diagnose an acute Charcot foot? Do you use any ancillary testing?      A: Most of the time, Geoffrey Habershaw, DPM, diagnoses acute Charcot by combining the patient’s history and physical with simple tests.      Dr. Habershaw, Lawrence Lavery, DP... continue reading