CE: A Guide To Current Concepts In Skin Grafting

Author(s): 
By Tod Storm, DPM

Continuing Education Course #157: October 2007

I am pleased to introduce the latest article, “A Guide To Current Concepts In Skin Grafting,” in our CE series. This series, brought to you by the North American Center for Continuing Medical Education (NACCME), consists of complimentary CE activities that qualify for one continuing education contact hour (.1 CEU). Readers will not be required to pay a processing fee for this course. Podiatrists commonly use skin grafts to help close difficult wounds in the lower extremity. Accordingly, Tod Storm, DPM, offers key insights on full-thickness and split-thickness skin grafts. He also offers a closer look at wound bed preparation, graft harvesting, graft placement, and provides pearls on postoperative care. At the end of this article, you’ll find a 10-question exam. Please mark your responses on the enclosed postcard and return it to NACCME. This course will be posted on Podiatry Today’s Web site (www.podiatrytoday.com) roughly one month after the publication date. I hope this CE series contributes to your clinical skills. Sincerely, Jeff A. Hall Executive Editor Podiatry Today INSTRUCTIONS: Physicians may receive one continuing education contact hour (.1 CEU) by reading the article on pg. 77 and successfully answering the questions on pg. 82. Use the enclosed card provided to submit your answers or log on to www.podiatrytoday.com and respond via fax to (610) 560-0502. ACCREDITATION: NACCME is approved by the Council on Podiatric Medical Education as a sponsor of continuing education in podiatric medicine. DESIGNATION: This activity is approved for 1 continuing education contact hour or .1 CEU. DISCLOSURE POLICY: All faculty participating in Continuing Education programs sponsored by NACCME are expected to disclose to the audience any real or apparent conflicts of interest related to the content of their presentation. DISCLOSURE STATEMENTS: Dr. Storm has disclosed that he has no significant financial relationship with any organization that could be perceived as a real or apparent conflict of interest in the context of the subject of his presentation. GRADING: Answers to the CE exam will be graded by NACCME. Within 60 days, you will be advised that you have passed or failed the exam. A score of 70 percent or above will comprise a passing grade. A certificate will be awarded to participants who successfully complete the exam. TARGET AUDIENCE: Podiatrists RELEASE DATE: October 2007 EXPIRATION DATE: October 31, 2008 LEARNING OBJECTIVES: At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to: • review the characteristics of full-thickness skin grafts (FTSGs) and split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs); • compare the potential benefits and drawbacks of FTSGs and STSGs; • list possible donor sites for FTSGs; • discuss keys to preparing the wound bed to receive the skin graft; and • discuss postoperative considerations, including proper dressing usage. Sponsored by the North American Center for Continuing Medical Education. Podiatric surgeons commonly use skin grafting for the closure of cutaneous wounds secondary to trauma, post-amputation wounds and chronic ulcerations. Accordingly, this author details the pros and cons of various types of skin grafts, including full-thickness and split-thickness skin grafts, and offers step-by-step insights on graft application. The skin is the body’s first defense in preventing the invasion of pathological organisms. When a disruption of this envelope occurs, the surgeon’s primary goal is closing the wound as quickly as possible with the least amount of risk to the patient. The methods of wound closure available to a surgeon include primary closure, skin grafting and soft tissue flaps. Skin grafting involves transferring a portion of the skin, devoid of its blood supply, from one area to another. In some situations, skin grafting can have some advantages over other methods. Grafts are relatively simple to perform, reliable and can cover large areas. The popularity of skin grafting has certainly stood the test of time.

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