DPM Blogs

Is 3D Printing Of Surgical Instruments Incision or Retraction?

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD
3/12/14 | 1249 reads | 0 comments
Although three-dimensional printing technology is an emerging solution for a number of real world problems, there has not been much research into the viability of 3D printing of surgical instruments. However, my colleagues and I recently conducted a study in the Journal of Surgical Research showing that 3D printers can produce durable, sterile surgical instruments at a cost of about 10 percent of the price of stainless steel OR tools.1 Read More.

Keys To Reducing The Frustration Of Hammertoe Surgery

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
3/11/14 | 1804 reads | 0 comments
In my January blog, I wrote about the use of the flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer for the flexible or semi-rigid hammertoe/claw toe deformities (see http://www.podiatrytoday.com/blogged/why-flexor-digitorum-longus-transfe... ). I would like to take a look at the other approach to the rigid hammertoe deformity and specifically arthroplasty vs. arthrodesis. Read More.

Make No Mistake: Mistakes Happen

Lynn Homisak PRT
3/7/14 | 1393 reads | 0 comments
Yes, mistakes do and will happen. But did you ever stop to think why? Is one type of person more likely than another to make mistakes or is it due to lack of focus, little attention to detail, distractions, too much to do or absent direction? Perhaps the mistake is the result of procrastination and the subsequent push to get everything done in a self-inflicted timeframe. Read More.

How Did Heel Spurs Become Public Enemy Number One?

Stephen Barrett DPM FACFAS
3/5/14 | 1931 reads | 0 comments
The cool, dark west Texas night sky was nearly silent. It was almost like I had been placed into some type of surreal soundproof chamber. There was a big silence, except for the occasional coyote howl, and of course the regular cracking and popping of the roaring campfire. But that was like white noise. You never heard it unless you really concentrated. There is nothing like being out on a roundup, resting by the flickering fingers of the orange and yellow flames of the fire, being bone aching tired from herding cows all day. Then the silence ended. Read More.

Why Future Podiatrists Need Our Mentoring

Bradly Bussewitz DPM
3/4/14 | 1572 reads | 0 comments
This month’s blog comes courtesy of Garret Strand, a first-year podiatric medical student at the Dr. William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. His commentary emphasizes the importance of why all of us who are established in the profession should take the opportunity to mentor the podiatrists of tomorrow. — Bradly Bussewitz, DPM Read More.

Do Your Patients Have Orthotic Arch Irritation When Standing For Long Periods?

Larry Huppin DPM
2/27/14 | 3749 reads | 1 comments
A colleague called me recently with a question regarding a patient who feels that his orthoses are very comfortable when he is walking on them but they are feeling hard when he stands in one place on the orthotic devices. This is an issue I run into a lot. I practice in Seattle and treat a lot of Boeing employees who stand on concrete all day. I have found those people who are standing in one place on hard surfaces do not usually tolerate quite as much arch height as those that spend most of their day walking or sitting. Read More.

Essential Tips For Fitting Soccer Cleats

Jenny L Sanders DPM
2/26/14 | 2409 reads | 0 comments
Soccer cleats are notoriously tight and narrow. This combined with a flexible, unsupportive upper can cause foot and ankle injuries secondary to shoe structure, independent of foot structure or alignment. Read More.

What Podiatrists Can Learn From An All-Star Shortstop’s Career

William Fishco DPM FACFAS
2/25/14 | 2495 reads | 0 comments
I read recently that Derek Jeter is going to retire after the 2014 baseball season. You are probably wondering what this has to do with podiatry. I have blogged in the past about the secrets of success in practice. In the blog “Starting Your Practice Off On The Right Foot After Graduation,” the first and most important “secret” is to do the right thing for every patient all of the time (see http://tinyurl.com/m9oxgjz ). Read More.

Diagnosing And Treating Acute And Chronic Gout

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
2/20/14 | 1561 reads | 0 comments
Gout is a type of arthropathy that results from the formation of crystals. Gout may occur from either the over-production of uric acid (the cause of most cases) or the under-excretion of uric acid.1,2 Uric acid, which the kidneys excrete, is an end product of purine metabolism.2 Normal values of serum uric acid are 6 mg/dL or less in women and 7 mg/dL or less in men. However, elevated levels do not always correlate with an acute gout attack. Levels greater than 6 mg/dL simply increase one’s risk of a gout attack. Read More.