DPM Blogs

Can You Identify This Nail Disorder?

Tracey Vlahovic DPM
3/27/14 | 1993 reads | 5 comments
What is your diagnosis of the condition shown in the photo on the left? The idiopathic T-cell-mediated inflammatory condition generally affects several nails. The nails become thin, rough, ridged longitudinally, fissured and can develop a dorsal wing formation of the proximal nail fold (or pterygium formation) over the nail plate. Permanent scarring will ensue unless the matrix damage is addressed. Read More.

Unraveling The Mystery Of Metatarsalgia Under The Second Metatarsal Head

William Fishco DPM FACFAS
3/26/14 | 8817 reads | 1 comments
Metatarsalgia under the second metatarsal head is a condition we treat on a daily basis. Unfortunately, it can be difficult to treat and manage. Read More.

Facilitating Support And Comfort In Orthoses For Obese Patients

Larry Huppin DPM
3/25/14 | 1407 reads | 0 comments
A colleague recently called about a patient who felt his orthotic device was too hard. He wanted to know if he could possibly make a softer orthotic for this patient, who weighs 310 pounds. Or course, obese patients put significant pressure onto their feet. When they wear an orthosis, there is significant force between the orthosis and the foot, much more so than what would occur with a patient of average weight. This means that these patients have more potential to feel the arch of the orthosis as too high or too hard. Read More.

Back To Basics: Why The Proximal First Metatarsal Osteotomy Is Resurging

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
3/21/14 | 2849 reads | 0 comments
In 1928, McMensor noted that "in medical literature, ideas are frequently presented, forgotten and presented again.”1 In recent years, we have seen a resurgence of interest in proximal first metatarsal osteotomy procedures for the correction of bunion deformities. Numerous orthopedic suppliers now provide specific fixation devices for proximal first metatarsal closing and opening wedge osteotomies. This has been an interesting phenomenon, considering the enthusiasm for the Lapidus type of bunion correction over recent years. Read More.

Surgical Considerations For Hallux Varus

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
3/19/14 | 1275 reads | 0 comments
As we all know, in hallux varus, the first metatarsal assumes a medially deviated position and moves closer to the midline of the body. A purely transverse plane deformity, hallux varus is the most common complication of hallux valgus surgery.1 The reported incidence ranges from 2 to 17 percent.2 Congenital hallux varus is typically due to connective tissue disorders (i.e. Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) or is associated with Down syndrome and neuromuscular disorders (i.e. cerebral palsy).2 Read More.

Why Biomechanics Education Is Essential If We Want To Be The Sports Medicine Experts

Doug Richie Jr. DPM FACFAS
3/18/14 | 8304 reads | 0 comments
I just finished reading a tribute to the legendary orthopedic surgeon, Frank Jobe, MD, written by Bill Shaikin, which appeared in the Los Angeles Times on Saturday, March 8.1 Dr. Jobe had passed away two days earlier at age 88. For those who don’t know, Dr. Jobe pioneered the elbow procedure known as “Tommy John surgery,” which has saved the careers of countless major league baseball players. Read More.

The Importance Of Physical Therapy In Our Practice

Nicholas A Campitelli DPM FACFAS
3/14/14 | 1482 reads | 0 comments
As a runner and former athletic trainer, I really value the importance of physical rehabilitation in my practice. I value this not only for my patients who are runners but also for patients who are recovering from surgery. Read More.

Is 3D Printing Of Surgical Instruments Incision or Retraction?

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD
3/12/14 | 1241 reads | 0 comments
Although three-dimensional printing technology is an emerging solution for a number of real world problems, there has not been much research into the viability of 3D printing of surgical instruments. However, my colleagues and I recently conducted a study in the Journal of Surgical Research showing that 3D printers can produce durable, sterile surgical instruments at a cost of about 10 percent of the price of stainless steel OR tools.1 Read More.

Keys To Reducing The Frustration Of Hammertoe Surgery

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
3/11/14 | 1799 reads | 0 comments
In my January blog, I wrote about the use of the flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer for the flexible or semi-rigid hammertoe/claw toe deformities (see http://www.podiatrytoday.com/blogged/why-flexor-digitorum-longus-transfe... ). I would like to take a look at the other approach to the rigid hammertoe deformity and specifically arthroplasty vs. arthrodesis. Read More.