DPM Blogs

Ensuring Proper Paperwork When Treating Pediatric Patients

Ron Raducanu DPM FACFAS
12/28/09 | 3482 reads | 0 comments
As this is the first blog concerning pediatric podiatry, I would first like to thank Podiatry Today for giving me the opportunity to participate on behalf of the American College of Foot and Ankle Pediatrics. As more and more of us step into the realm of podopediatrics, it is important to have a regular forum to not only ask questions but gather information across our profession. Read More.

Wound Care Haiti: Raising Awareness And Making A Difference For People With Diabetes

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
12/28/09 | 5358 reads | 2 comments
The non-profit organization I have started, Wound Care Haiti, was invited to participate in the World Diabetes Day by the Haitian Foundation for Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease (FHADIMAC). I traveled to Haiti along with two colleagues, Timothy Syperek, DPM, and Robert Hatcher, DPM. The weeklong program was geared to help Wound Care Haiti and FHADIMAC establish a world class wound care center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Read More.

A Closer Look At Current Biologics For Psoriasis

Tracey Vlahovic DPM
12/22/09 | 3893 reads | 1 comments
Approximately 2 percent of the U.S. population have psoriasis, which can affect skin, nails and joints. Therapies include topical medications (such as corticosteroids and moisturizers), oral medications (methotrexate and cyclosporine) and phototherapy (PUVA and UVB). Targeted systemic therapies, typically known as “the biologics,” have been gathering momentum in the treatment of psoriasis. I have personally seen significant improvement in the quality of life for some of my patients on various biologics. Read More.

A Systematic Approach To Pediatric Flatfoot: What To Do And When To Do It

Michelle L. Butterworth DPM FACFAS
12/22/09 | 8176 reads | 2 comments
Pediatric flatfoot is a common yet challenging deformity. Infants are usually born with a flexible flatfoot and typically do not develop a normal arch until they are 7 to 10 years old. One of the biggest challenges for the physician is differentiating a normal or physiologic flatfoot from the pathological deformity. Read More.

A Closer Look At The Plantar Fat Pad In People With Diabetes

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD
12/21/09 | 3973 reads | 0 comments
At the Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA), we have been fascinated with a recent paper by our colleagues Hsu and co-workers from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and National Taiwan University Hospital. These authors suggest that the plantar fat pad -- that specialized fat that exists on the sole of every one of us -- may undergo changes in people with diabetes. To make a long story short, fewer small “microchambers” of fat make it less cushy and more susceptible to ulceration. We invite you to give the work a read. See Read More.

Giving Thanks For Those Who Helped Shape My Career In Podiatry

William Fishco DPM FACFAS
12/7/09 | 4412 reads | 2 comments
Given the holiday season, I thought I would dedicate this blog to giving thanks to those who have helped me in my professional life. Read More.

Does Marketing Make The Podiatrist Or Does Reputation Make The Podiatrist?

Kathleen Satterfield DPM FACFAOM
12/7/09 | 3306 reads | 1 comments
There are two camps of podiatrists: those who have formal practices and those who are physicians but are business and marketing-minded as well. The latter do what it takes to bring the patients in the door and keep them coming in. The former put their names on the door and let their reputations do the advertising for them. These are the speakers, educators and book editors in our profession. Incidentally, they do not usually make much money in a lifetime. They may say that their riches are in the form of their students and publication, and not in their bank accounts. Read More.

How Much Do You Charge For Foot Orthoses?

Doug Richie Jr. DPM FACFAS
12/4/09 | 14354 reads | 1 comments
How often do patients ask you or your office staff “How much do you charge for foot orthotics?” The answer for most podiatric offices will range from $400 to $600, and will often come as a shock to the naïve patient. After all, how could two pieces of plastic cost that much money? The answer to this question unveils many myths and misconceptions about foot orthotic therapy that exist among podiatric physicians and their patients. Read More.

Regnault’s HAT Graft Procedure: Can It Have An Impact For Hallux Rigidus And Hallux Valgus?

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
12/3/09 | 4241 reads | 0 comments
Over the years, I have continued to employ the osteochondral graft procedure (HAT graft procedure), described by Bernard Regnault, MD, in selected cases of hallux valgus and hallux rigidus. I find the procedure to be reliable in satisfying the requirements of elderly patients as it offers a viable alternative to arthrodesis, resection arthroplasty or implant arthroplasty. Read More.