DPM Blogs

Can Walking Sensors Help Predict The Outcome Of Diabetic Limb Salvage Surgery?

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD
1/25/10 | 2628 reads | 0 comments
In the past, surgery designed to heal wounds or reduce the risk for development of wounds in people with diabetes has been haphazard. A recently published pilot study in Gait & Posture suggests strongly that we can work toward predicting success preoperatively.1 See http://tinyurl.com/yzbkt96 Read More.

New Year’s Resolution: Get Involved In Your State Association

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
1/25/10 | 3003 reads | 0 comments
Well, it is that time of year again. It is the time for New Year’s resolutions. Lose weight, stop smoking, read more, exercise more, etc. We have all made resolutions and sometimes keep them. Here is one I would ask you to consider for this upcoming year: become involved with your state podiatric medical association. Read More.

Why A Post-Op Fatality Is A Wake-Up Call On DVT Prophylaxis

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
1/20/10 | 7349 reads | 2 comments
The issue of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis remains controversial with reference to foot and ankle surgery. The limited available studies for review suggest that the incidence of DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE) following foot surgery is acceptably low, and that routine prophylaxis is not required. However, many of these same articles suggest that one should consider prophylaxis when several risk factors for DVT or pulmonary embolism (PE) are present. Read More.

Will Diabetic Limb Preservation Be A Priority In The New Health Care System?

Andrew Rice DPM FACFAS
1/15/10 | 2325 reads | 1 comments
In contemplating what I should post in my first blog for Podiatry Today, I reviewed several published articles describing procedures that have interested me. I initially thought I would write about techniques I have integrated into my practice. Read More.

Can Testosterone Play A Key Role In Healing DFUs In Patients With PAD?

Kathleen Satterfield DPM FACFAOM
1/13/10 | 3422 reads | 0 comments
My first podiatric mentor, Leonard Levy, DPM, challenged me to always practice to the furthest extent of my license. From day one of my education, Dr. Levy advised: Do the right thing for your patient first and, if necessary, ask for forgiveness later. I should probably mention now that my first mentor, Dr. Levy, is currently serving a Fulbright Fellowship, the first ever by a podiatrist. Dr Levy is now in his seventies. Remarkable, isn’t it? Read More.

What You Should Know About Night Pain And Distal Tibialis Anterior Tendinopathy

Doug Richie Jr. DPM FACFAS
1/8/10 | 7623 reads | 0 comments
How many foot and ankle conditions do you treat that are aggravated by malpositioning of the foot during sleep? Yes, we commonly attribute the classic morning pain of plantar fasciitis to the equinus postioning of the foot during sleep, which presumably tightens the plantar aponeurosis. We also hear significant complaints from patients with Achilles tendinosis when they step out of bed. What about pain during the night? Over the years, I have seen one classic condition in which pain is worse during sleep. This condition is distal tibialis anterior tendinopathy. Read More.

Assessing The Progress Of The Podiatric Profession

Lawrence Fallat DPM FACFAS
1/7/10 | 3245 reads | 1 comments
In the late 1970s and early 1980s, the typical surgical procedures performed by podiatrists were bunionectomies, digital arthroplasties, heel spurs and neuroma excisions. Few did rearfoot surgery and even fewer did trauma. When it came to fixation, podiatrists used K-wires and monofilament wire. Podiatrists did not use bone screws or plates. Read More.

The Top Ten Ubiquitous Patients Who Present To Podiatry Offices

William Fishco DPM FACFAS
1/4/10 | 3803 reads | 1 comments
On the lighter side, I thought I would dedicate this blog to our patients. Here is a top ten list of the ubiquitous podiatric patients for your review and reflections. 1. “The Poor Historian.” The Poor Historian presents to your office for the first time. While you are reviewing his or her intake paperwork, you notice that the patient is not taking any medications, never had any surgery, and has no allergies. On paper, the Poor Historian looks like the epitome of good health. Read More.

A Closer Look At The Open And Screw Fixation Approach To The Lisfranc’s Injury

Neal Blitz DPM FACFAS
1/4/10 | 8338 reads | 1 comments
It is widely agreed that the Lisfranc’s fracture/dislocation are significant injuries that have the potential to cause major morbidity in the short-term and even more so in the long-term. Though it is not entirely clear what aspect of these injuries result in the long-term problems (pain), they seem to be related to midfoot arthrosis and/or a resultant structural deformity. Read More.