DPM Blogs

Can Testosterone Play A Key Role In Healing DFUs In Patients With PAD?

Kathleen Satterfield DPM FACFAOM
1/13/10 | 3243 reads | 0 comments
My first podiatric mentor, Leonard Levy, DPM, challenged me to always practice to the furthest extent of my license. From day one of my education, Dr. Levy advised: Do the right thing for your patient first and, if necessary, ask for forgiveness later. I should probably mention now that my first mentor, Dr. Levy, is currently serving a Fulbright Fellowship, the first ever by a podiatrist. Dr Levy is now in his seventies. Remarkable, isn’t it? Read More.

What You Should Know About Night Pain And Distal Tibialis Anterior Tendinopathy

Doug Richie Jr. DPM FACFAS
1/8/10 | 6583 reads | 0 comments
How many foot and ankle conditions do you treat that are aggravated by malpositioning of the foot during sleep? Yes, we commonly attribute the classic morning pain of plantar fasciitis to the equinus postioning of the foot during sleep, which presumably tightens the plantar aponeurosis. We also hear significant complaints from patients with Achilles tendinosis when they step out of bed. What about pain during the night? Over the years, I have seen one classic condition in which pain is worse during sleep. This condition is distal tibialis anterior tendinopathy. Read More.

Assessing The Progress Of The Podiatric Profession

Lawrence Fallat DPM FACFAS
1/7/10 | 3064 reads | 1 comments
In the late 1970s and early 1980s, the typical surgical procedures performed by podiatrists were bunionectomies, digital arthroplasties, heel spurs and neuroma excisions. Few did rearfoot surgery and even fewer did trauma. When it came to fixation, podiatrists used K-wires and monofilament wire. Podiatrists did not use bone screws or plates. Read More.

The Top Ten Ubiquitous Patients Who Present To Podiatry Offices

William Fishco DPM FACFAS
1/4/10 | 3653 reads | 1 comments
On the lighter side, I thought I would dedicate this blog to our patients. Here is a top ten list of the ubiquitous podiatric patients for your review and reflections. 1. “The Poor Historian.” The Poor Historian presents to your office for the first time. While you are reviewing his or her intake paperwork, you notice that the patient is not taking any medications, never had any surgery, and has no allergies. On paper, the Poor Historian looks like the epitome of good health. Read More.

A Closer Look At The Open And Screw Fixation Approach To The Lisfranc’s Injury

Neal Blitz DPM FACFAS
1/4/10 | 7245 reads | 1 comments
It is widely agreed that the Lisfranc’s fracture/dislocation are significant injuries that have the potential to cause major morbidity in the short-term and even more so in the long-term. Though it is not entirely clear what aspect of these injuries result in the long-term problems (pain), they seem to be related to midfoot arthrosis and/or a resultant structural deformity. Read More.

Ensuring Proper Paperwork When Treating Pediatric Patients

Ron Raducanu DPM FACFAS
12/28/09 | 3332 reads | 0 comments
As this is the first blog concerning pediatric podiatry, I would first like to thank Podiatry Today for giving me the opportunity to participate on behalf of the American College of Foot and Ankle Pediatrics. As more and more of us step into the realm of podopediatrics, it is important to have a regular forum to not only ask questions but gather information across our profession. Read More.

Wound Care Haiti: Raising Awareness And Making A Difference For People With Diabetes

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
12/28/09 | 5102 reads | 2 comments
The non-profit organization I have started, Wound Care Haiti, was invited to participate in the World Diabetes Day by the Haitian Foundation for Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease (FHADIMAC). I traveled to Haiti along with two colleagues, Timothy Syperek, DPM, and Robert Hatcher, DPM. The weeklong program was geared to help Wound Care Haiti and FHADIMAC establish a world class wound care center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Read More.

A Closer Look At Current Biologics For Psoriasis

Tracey Vlahovic DPM
12/22/09 | 3690 reads | 1 comments
Approximately 2 percent of the U.S. population have psoriasis, which can affect skin, nails and joints. Therapies include topical medications (such as corticosteroids and moisturizers), oral medications (methotrexate and cyclosporine) and phototherapy (PUVA and UVB). Targeted systemic therapies, typically known as “the biologics,” have been gathering momentum in the treatment of psoriasis. I have personally seen significant improvement in the quality of life for some of my patients on various biologics. Read More.

A Systematic Approach To Pediatric Flatfoot: What To Do And When To Do It

Michelle L. Butterworth DPM FACFAS
12/22/09 | 7444 reads | 2 comments
Pediatric flatfoot is a common yet challenging deformity. Infants are usually born with a flexible flatfoot and typically do not develop a normal arch until they are 7 to 10 years old. One of the biggest challenges for the physician is differentiating a normal or physiologic flatfoot from the pathological deformity. Read More.