DPM Blogs

What I Learned From My Patient Horror Stories

Kathleen Satterfield DPM FACFAOM
6/17/11 | 3554 reads | 0 comments
We all have these patient horror stories and we usually share them after one drink too many. These stories fall into one of three categories: bragging, laughing or crying. However, if we stop there, we have missed the point. These are the best cases to learn from. Please share some of your own and tell us what you have learned from yours. It is the professional version of “I will show you mine if you show me yours.” The Crying Case: Pseudomonas Resulting From A Submerged Cast Read More.

Dumb And Dumber: Questioning Risky Treatment In A Case Of Posterior Heel Pain

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
6/15/11 | 3966 reads | 3 comments
In reviewing medical records, I often wonder why some doctors will place themselves into an arena that invites malpractice actions. Let me present an example, a recent case that I reviewed for a plaintiff. Although I did not feel that there was malpractice in this case, I did find the treatment of the patient interesting. A relatively healthy middle-aged female consulted a podiatrist for posterior heel pain. She had no prior treatment. Her medical history was significant for controlled hypertension and low thyroid function. Read More.

Are We Entering The Age Of Decay?

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD
6/10/11 | 3034 reads | 0 comments
I was listening to my favorite program the other night, BBC Radio 4's In Our Time. This program focused on “The Origins of Infectious Disease.” As usual, Melvyn Bragg puts forth a fascinating topic. One of the superb panelists, Steve Jones, BSc, PhD, a Professor of Genetics at University College London and a UK Stem Cell Foundation Trustee, pointed out that we could divide the roughly 200,000 years of Homo sapiens into the following three ages of death. The Age of Disaster: When we often met our demise as we were bitten, impaled or otherwise devoured. Read More.

How To Properly Align A Lapidus Bunionectomy In The Frontal Plane

Neal Blitz DPM FACFAS
6/7/11 | 4507 reads | 0 comments
Surgeons performing the Lapidus bunionectomy often consider the sagittal and frontal plane position of the first metatarsal bone. However, surgeons place less attention on the frontal plane position. It’s not that surgeons do not consider frontal plane position but it is a more subtle technical aspect of the procedure that has not been discussed much in the literature. Read More.

Key Insights On Osteochondral Lesions Of The Talus

William Fishco DPM FACFAS
6/3/11 | 8272 reads | 0 comments
Osteochondral lesions of the talus can be a cause of chronic ankle pain, which does not respond to typical treatment regimens of rest, ice, anti-inflammatory medication, immobilization, bracing, physical therapy and/or orthotic use. Osteochondral lesions can occur in any joint. Read More.

Why Conservative Treatment Is The Standard Of Care For Adult-Acquired Flatfoot

Doug Richie Jr. DPM FACFAS
6/2/11 | 4070 reads | 0 comments
There has been recent discussion on this Web site regarding the need or the effectiveness of conservative care prior to recommending or performing bunionectomy surgery (see http://bit.ly/f9x9MM ). I am in agreement with those who believe that conservative care is not necessary before performing bunion surgery in adults. When it comes to children and adolescents, I have seen improvement of symptoms and sometimes improvement of deformity with functional foot orthotic therapy. Therefore, I recommend conservative treatment for this group of patients before performing surgery. Read More.

Negotiating The Biomechanics Of Equinus

Russell Volpe DPM
5/27/11 | 4282 reads | 0 comments
As someone who teaches and writes a great deal about biomechanics, orthopedic and pediatric podiatric medicine, I often discuss equinus influences as among the most destructive on the foot in gait. This critical sagittal plane pathology can occur at any age and comes in congenital and acquired forms. As bipedal locomotion is essentially a sagittal plane event as we move the body forward on a horizontal surface, limitations in sagittal plane motion can lead to destructive compensations that ultimately precipitate pathology. Read More.

A Spirit Of Collaboration At The International Symposium On The Diabetic Foot

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD
5/25/11 | 2888 reads | 2 comments
The sixth annual International Symposium on the Diabetic Foot (ISDF) recently met in the Netherlands to achieve a consensus for the next generation of worldwide guidelines for the diabetic foot. I was one of 1,000 participants from 77 nations to attend with one mission: improve the quality of care for patients with diabetes. Read More.

Why Orthotics Are Not The Answer For Plantar Fasciitis

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
5/23/11 | 12459 reads | 9 comments
There are approximately 2 million documented cases of plantar fasciitis per year in the United States. For most podiatrists, this is the most common foot pathology we see in our practices.1 The “sacred cow” in the podiatric community for plantar fasciitis has always been custom orthoses. Read More.