DPM Blogs

Are We Entering The Age Of Decay?

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD
6/10/11 | 3008 reads | 0 comments
I was listening to my favorite program the other night, BBC Radio 4's In Our Time. This program focused on “The Origins of Infectious Disease.” As usual, Melvyn Bragg puts forth a fascinating topic. One of the superb panelists, Steve Jones, BSc, PhD, a Professor of Genetics at University College London and a UK Stem Cell Foundation Trustee, pointed out that we could divide the roughly 200,000 years of Homo sapiens into the following three ages of death. The Age of Disaster: When we often met our demise as we were bitten, impaled or otherwise devoured. Read More.

How To Properly Align A Lapidus Bunionectomy In The Frontal Plane

Neal Blitz DPM FACFAS
6/7/11 | 4411 reads | 0 comments
Surgeons performing the Lapidus bunionectomy often consider the sagittal and frontal plane position of the first metatarsal bone. However, surgeons place less attention on the frontal plane position. It’s not that surgeons do not consider frontal plane position but it is a more subtle technical aspect of the procedure that has not been discussed much in the literature. Read More.

Key Insights On Osteochondral Lesions Of The Talus

William Fishco DPM FACFAS
6/3/11 | 8124 reads | 0 comments
Osteochondral lesions of the talus can be a cause of chronic ankle pain, which does not respond to typical treatment regimens of rest, ice, anti-inflammatory medication, immobilization, bracing, physical therapy and/or orthotic use. Osteochondral lesions can occur in any joint. Read More.

Why Conservative Treatment Is The Standard Of Care For Adult-Acquired Flatfoot

Doug Richie Jr. DPM FACFAS
6/2/11 | 4023 reads | 0 comments
There has been recent discussion on this Web site regarding the need or the effectiveness of conservative care prior to recommending or performing bunionectomy surgery (see http://bit.ly/f9x9MM ). I am in agreement with those who believe that conservative care is not necessary before performing bunion surgery in adults. When it comes to children and adolescents, I have seen improvement of symptoms and sometimes improvement of deformity with functional foot orthotic therapy. Therefore, I recommend conservative treatment for this group of patients before performing surgery. Read More.

Negotiating The Biomechanics Of Equinus

Russell Volpe DPM
5/27/11 | 4186 reads | 0 comments
As someone who teaches and writes a great deal about biomechanics, orthopedic and pediatric podiatric medicine, I often discuss equinus influences as among the most destructive on the foot in gait. This critical sagittal plane pathology can occur at any age and comes in congenital and acquired forms. As bipedal locomotion is essentially a sagittal plane event as we move the body forward on a horizontal surface, limitations in sagittal plane motion can lead to destructive compensations that ultimately precipitate pathology. Read More.

A Spirit Of Collaboration At The International Symposium On The Diabetic Foot

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD
5/25/11 | 2863 reads | 2 comments
The sixth annual International Symposium on the Diabetic Foot (ISDF) recently met in the Netherlands to achieve a consensus for the next generation of worldwide guidelines for the diabetic foot. I was one of 1,000 participants from 77 nations to attend with one mission: improve the quality of care for patients with diabetes. Read More.

Why Orthotics Are Not The Answer For Plantar Fasciitis

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
5/23/11 | 11510 reads | 9 comments
There are approximately 2 million documented cases of plantar fasciitis per year in the United States. For most podiatrists, this is the most common foot pathology we see in our practices.1 The “sacred cow” in the podiatric community for plantar fasciitis has always been custom orthoses. Read More.

Is Pseudomonas A Legitimate Pathogen Or A Notorious Colonizer In Lower Extremity Infections?

Warren S. Joseph DPM FIDSA
5/19/11 | 6256 reads | 3 comments
For a number of years, I have referred in my lectures to the word I have termed “Pseudomonaphobia.” Basically, this is an irrational fear of the organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa when it is isolated from a culture of a wound in the foot. I really believe this arises in most podiatrists during the residency interview process when, without fail, the interviewer asks them, “How would you treat a Pseudomonas infection in the foot?” Read More.

Should Podiatrists Embrace Barefoot Running?

Neal Blitz DPM FACFAS
5/18/11 | 4423 reads | 3 comments
Hey, Doc, what is your position on barefoot/minimalist running? Unless you practice under a rock, then it is likely that you have noticed more and more people getting involved in the barefoot running movement. You do not have to be a sports medicine focused podiatrist to have treated patients who have tried minimalist running. Chances are that these particular patients are seeking your medical advice to a treat a foot problem "related" to this method of running. Perhaps you have treated patients who have developed plantar fasciitis, cuts and blisters, or perhaps even stress fractures. Read More.