DPM Blogs

Should Podiatric Physicians Monitor HBOT?

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
5/16/12 | 4963 reads | 0 comments
“First do no harm.” Many often refer incorrectly to this phrase as part of the Hippocratic Oath. (In fact, the quote is “to do good or to do no harm.”) This phrase actually comes from the Hippocratic writing Epidemics. The meaning of this statement is of the utmost importance no matter the origin. I am proud to be part of the progress of the podiatric profession in its quest of the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) Vision 2015. In my opinion, however, some of these professional advancements violate the aforementioned quote. Read More.

Why Focusing On Tidbits Of Information Can Lead You Down The Wrong Diagnostic Path

Stephen Barrett DPM FACFAS
5/11/12 | 3552 reads | 0 comments
I had a very interesting patient come in last month. Sadly, she was in an automobile accident about four years ago, which resulted in an intracranial bleed. She ended up with severe vertigo and loss of strength on her left side. The car hit her from the left side, causing trauma to the entire aspect of her left side, including an ulna fracture as well as a tibial plateau fracture of the left knee. Read More.

Why We Need Better Data On Fitting Shoes For Children

Ron Raducanu DPM FACFAS
5/9/12 | 3274 reads | 0 comments
Children are not just little adults. We know this intuitively when we care for our own children but when it comes to feet, I think most shoe companies are really regressing. Read More.

Educating Patients On The Three-Point Approach To Testing Running Shoes

Jenny L Sanders DPM
5/7/12 | 4002 reads | 0 comments
Patients frequently ask for guidance in choosing an appropriate running shoe. In the 1990s, Mark Reeves, DPM, of the Virginia Mason Sports Medicine Clinic in Seattle, created the three-point approach to testing running shoes. Read More.

Certification And Wound Care Expertise: Are They One And The Same?

Desmond Bell DPM CWS FACCWS
5/4/12 | 4188 reads | 6 comments
First, I would like to thank the readers for taking the time to review the topics I have presented regarding the world of wound care. If you read my blog, you are likely seeking some insight or clinical perspectives that may help you in managing patients with chronic wounds from a variety of etiologies. This month, I would like to turn the tables and gain some knowledge from you, my respected colleagues, on your approach to things, specifically how you have attained your level of expertise. Read More.

Why Your Practice’s Financial Success Is Tied To Staff Performance

Lynn Homisak PRT
5/1/12 | 3220 reads | 2 comments
In a recent article, George Taylor writes that he considers an engaged employee “an economic engine for your practice.”1 He makes a lot of interesting points that mirror ideas I firmly adhere to and advocate. That is, there is an undeniable link between well-trained, satisfied employees and the financial success of a practice. I wonder: if staff had CPT codes hung around their necks, making it easier for doctors to measure their productivity, would their efforts be more acknowledged and appreciated? Read More.

Secrets To Performing Bunion Surgeries That Will Stand The Test Of Time

William Fishco DPM FACFAS
4/30/12 | 5456 reads | 2 comments
I am sitting in the Louisville airport waiting to catch a plane back to Phoenix. I thought this would be a good time to write my next blog. I had a great morning of giving lectures for the Kentucky Podiatric Medical Association where I spoke for a couple hours on various surgical and non-surgical topics. One lecture was on bunion surgery and I thought I would share some of my thoughts regarding the dreaded complication of recurrent or failed bunionectomy. Read More.

A Review Of Treatment Options For Pitted Keratolysis

Tracey Vlahovic DPM
4/26/12 | 38153 reads | 0 comments
Lately at the Foot and Ankle Institute, we have had a “rash” (pun intended) of patients presenting with erythrasma and/or pitted keratolysis. Let’s focus on pitted keratolysis. Pitted keratolysis is a condition characterized by superficial erosions and 1 to 3 mm discrete crateriform pits along the sole of the foot due primarily to prolonged bromhidrosis.1 Although typically asymptomatic and non-inflammatory, patients with this condition often seek treatment because of the associated psychosocial factors such as odor and embarrassment. Read More.

Can Foot Orthotics Relieve The Pain Of Hallux Rigidus?

Doug Richie Jr. DPM FACFAS
4/25/12 | 14861 reads | 2 comments
I am always interested in theories and advice my colleagues post on the Internet regarding the use of custom foot orthoses to treat common pathologies. It is amazing to see the divergence of opinion regarding selection of materials, casting technique and prescription criteria to treat any single condition. Leading the list of pathologies that has the least agreement for orthotic therapy is hallux rigidus. Read More.