DPM Blogs

Study Shows One-Third Of Patients With Severe PAD And DFUs Die Without Revascularization

David G. Armstrong DPM MD PhD
6/21/13 | 1889 reads | 0 comments
A recent study published in the European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery shows that without revascularization, a significant number of patients with severe peripheral arterial disease will die before their diabetic foot ulcers heal.1 Read More.

Can Phenytoin Help Heal Diabetic And Venous Ulcers?

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
6/20/13 | 3029 reads | 0 comments
Extemporaneous compounding offers the ability to individualize treatment for the specific needs of each patient. Frequently, compounding allows the creation of topical preparations that are otherwise not commercially available. Topical preparations can provide increased concentration within the wound as they have the ability to alter local wound dynamics and chronic wound physiology without systemic modification of the selected agents.1 Read More.

An Overview Of Surgical Treatments For Stage II Tibialis Posterior Tendon Dysfunction

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
6/18/13 | 2960 reads | 0 comments
Regardless of the etiology of the deformity, the three principles for flexible flatfoot deformity surgical correction include: • removal of any deforming force of the leg onto the foot; • perpendicular alignment of the hindfoot to the ground; and • a parallel relationship of the forefoot to the rearfoot. This applies to pediatric flexible flatfoot, adult flexible flatfoot and stage II tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction The treatment of stage II tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction has evolved over the years to a well-documented group of procedures. Read More.

Peering Into The Crystal Ball: When Will The Podiatry Profession Shake Free Of Dogma When It Comes To Nerves?

Stephen Barrett DPM FACFAS
6/14/13 | 3422 reads | 0 comments
I will admit I was a little spooked when I entered this place. With the parting of the heavy hanging beads bejeweling the doorway of the fortune-teller’s “office,” the hairs on the back of my neck had reached full piloerection. Read More.

A Refresher On Obtaining Informed Consent From Patients

Bradly Bussewitz DPM
6/12/13 | 2332 reads | 0 comments
During my podiatric surgical training, I noticed a difference in approaches to surgical informed consent. Some may cut the consent process short to save time whereas others may cut it short to prevent patient worry or stress. Some surgeons may provide an exhaustive list of potential complications, thus overburdening the patient’s ability to process and make decisions. Clearly, obtaining consent to perform surgery on our patients is a critical process. Accordingly, let us take a closer look at key requirements on informed consent. Read More.

What’s Stopping You From Conducting Employee Performance Reviews?

Lynn Homisak PRT
6/11/13 | 1325 reads | 0 comments
I am surprised at how many doctors do not conduct performance reviews. I am not surprised that these are the same doctors who struggle with low employee performance or poor behavior. Read More.

Another Tip For Eliminating Orthotic-Induced Heel Slippage

Larry Huppin DPM
6/7/13 | 2753 reads | 0 comments
A fairly common complaint that I hear in my office is that of patients saying that their heel is slipping up inside one or more shoes when they wear their orthotic devices. This is usually a very easy problem to address and one that every orthotic practitioner should be aware of. Jenny Sanders, DPM, recently wrote an excellent DPM Blog (http://www.podiatrytoday.com/blogged/how-prevent-heel-slippage-orthotic ) on how to use lacing techniques and tongue pads to decrease heel slippage. Read More.

Passing Along Recommendations To Patients For Orthotic-Compatible Sandals

Jenny L Sanders DPM
6/4/13 | 9556 reads | 0 comments
The most important consideration when making a custom orthotic for a sandal is to make sure the sandal that the orthotic will be going into has a removable foot bed. Next, the orthotic should be made specifically for the purchased sandal. In order to accomplish this, I have my patients purchase the sandal first and then send the sandal and the custom orthotic prescription to the lab for a precise fit of the orthotic into the sandal. If you order an orthotic first and then try to fit to the sandal after the fact, it rarely works. Read More.

Managing Tarsometatarsal Joint Arthritis In Older Patients

William Fishco DPM FACFAS
6/3/13 | 3418 reads | 0 comments
Arthritis of the second and third tarsometatarsal joints can be a challenging condition to manage. Clinically, patients present with pain, stiffness and swelling located at the dorsal midfoot. Many patients also have a painful lump on the top of the foot, which makes it difficult to wear a closed shoe. Read More.