DPM Blogs

Performing Revision Surgery Following The Lapidus Bunionectomy

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
11/8/13 | 2498 reads | 0 comments
As with any bunion procedure, the Lapidus procedure may be associated with a number of potential complications and sequelae. Excessive elevation of the first metatarsal following the Lapidus procedure may result in lesser metatarsalgia or hallux limitus. Excessive shortening following the Lapidus procedure may also result in lesser metatarsalgia, hallux hammertoe deformity and lesser digital deformities. Injury to the peroneus longus or anterior tibial tendons may also occur as one performs the surgery in proximity to the insertion of these tendons. Read More.

When A Runner/Cyclist Presents With Second Metatarsal Pain

Larry Huppin DPM
11/7/13 | 2519 reads | 0 comments
A colleague recently asked me which orthotic type would be best for a runner/cyclist who has chronic sub-2nd MPJ capsulitis, which he felt was due to a relatively short first ray. The goal with any capsulitis is to reduce weightbearing on the painful metatarsal head so one should look at the orthotic prescription rather than a specific type of orthotic. Read More.

Can A Reverse Morton’s Extension Be Beneficial For Treating Functional Hallux Limitus?

Jenny L Sanders DPM
11/6/13 | 4875 reads | 0 comments
Functional hallux limitus is a loss of metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) extension during the second half of the single support phase when the weightbearing foot is in maximal dorsiflexion. Functionally, it constitutes a sagittal plane blockade during gait. As a result, the mechanical support and stability mechanisms of the foot are disrupted with important consequences during gait.1 Read More.

Why It’s Worth Revisiting The Lost Art Of Taping

Ron Raducanu DPM FACFAS
11/1/13 | 1522 reads | 0 comments
Taping is becoming a lost art. With all of our graduating residents getting virtually no office exposure throughout their three-year stints in training, it is a reality that we have to face and reverse. Read More.

Podiatric Dermatology Quiz: What Is Your Diagnosis Of This Condition?

Tracey Vlahovic DPM
10/30/13 | 3142 reads | 4 comments
Can you identify the condition in the photo on the left? The chronic pruritic skin disorder is often associated with a personal or family history of asthma, hay fever, allergic rhinitis and eczema. Most cases first become apparent in early childhood. Read More.

Are Gauntlets A Universal Solution For AFO Intervention?

Doug Richie Jr. DPM FACFAS
10/25/13 | 2042 reads | 2 comments
I often lecture on the topic of clinical indications for ankle-foot orthotic (AFO) therapy. Through interactions with many colleagues around the country, I am amazed at the number of practitioners who favor the use of gauntlet-style AFO devices for bracing the lower extremity. My suspicion is that the handsome reimbursement for these devices may supersede better judgment about patient adherence and improved clinical outcomes. Read More.

When Patients Present With Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
10/24/13 | 3051 reads | 0 comments
Tarsal tunnel syndrome is an entrapment of the posterior tibial nerve or one of its branches within the tarsal canal by the flexor retinaculum, the fibro-osseous tunnels, or the deep fascia.1-4 Sixty to 80 percent of cases have a specific cause of compression and there are multiple factors.5 • A tumor within the tarsal canal that puts pressure on the nerve • Fracture of the calcaneus with a fragment compressed against the nerve • Severe pronation that stretches the soft tissue and compresses the nerve • Enlarged blood vessels (i.e. varicose veins) Read More.

Getting Runners Back On Their Feet After Subungual Hematomas

Nicholas A Campitelli DPM FACFAS
10/22/13 | 2953 reads | 0 comments
Subungual hematomas frequently occur in distance runners and I tend to see a lot of them in my practice. While it can be a controversial topic in regard to either draining or removing the entire nail, I learned early in my career that it is best to remove the entire nail. Read More.