Advising Patients On Proper Ski Boot Fit

Jenny L Sanders DPM
3/11/11 | 4156 reads | 0 comments
During ski season, forefoot numbness due to tight fitting boots is a common problem. Due to the hard outer shell, patients find it difficult to determine proper fit. In addition, ski boot shops typically fit boots too snug, which directly contributes to the problem. An easy way to help your patients better understand fit is to have them bring in their ski boot inner liner and footbed. First remove the footbed and have the patient place his or her foot on it. If the patient’s toes extend beyond the footbed, plain and simple, the boot is too short. Read More.

Educating Patients On Excessive Wear Of Skechers Shape-Ups

Jenny L Sanders DPM
2/9/11 | 8295 reads | 2 comments
Another patient came in today with hip pain, heel pain and metatarsalgia secondary to excessively worn Skechers Shape-Ups. These shoes are everywhere (podiatry conferences included) and many patients have jumped on this “lose weight and tone while you walk” bandwagon. Read More.

Educating Patients On The Brannock Device And Shoe Sizes

Jenny L Sanders DPM
1/12/11 | 3994 reads | 0 comments
In 1927, Charles Brannock invented a measuring device that bears his name and is still used today in most retail shoe stores. According to the Brannock device, men’s shoe sizes are one size larger than women’s and not two sizes larger as commonly believed. For example, a men’s size 9 shoe would fit a woman’s size 10 foot. There is a 1/3-inch difference between sizes so if you need to go up or down a half size, you are only changing the size by 1/6-inch. This is not nearly as much as most patients think. Read More.

What Are The Best Athletic Shoes For Patients With Wide Feet?

Jenny L Sanders DPM
12/8/10 | 8378 reads | 1 comments
I previously blogged about my favorite running shoes for narrow feet (http://bit.ly/9L6jHP ). This month’s blog is about running shoes for wide feet. Wide widths for men are 2E and 4E, and wide widths for women are D and 2E. Brooks is my favorite manufacturer in the wide width category. For men, I prefer Brooks Beast®. For women, I prefer Brooks Ariel®. Both styles have firm heel counters and firm medial ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) for maximum pronation control. They will also accommodate an ankle foot orthotic (AFO) as well as a wide or medial flange orthotic. Read More.

Online Shoe Shopping: Can It Be Beneficial For Patients?

Jenny L Sanders DPM
11/2/10 | 4293 reads | 0 comments
For many patients, online shoe shopping can be easier than going to a retail store. Two of my favorite sites are www.zappos.com and www.endless.com. I especially like these sites because they offer free shipping both ways, deliver the shoes within two days to one week and credit card reimbursements are easy and painless. Read More.

What You Should Know About Rock Climbing Shoes

Jenny L Sanders DPM
10/1/10 | 8137 reads | 0 comments
The sport of rock climbing has become increasingly popular, especially with the availability of indoor climbing walls. With this increase in popularity, however, there has been a proportional increase in forefoot pain and pathology due to the shoes rock climbers are wearing. Rock climbing shoes are designed to fit snugly, which is where the problem arises. Read More.

What Are The Best Athletic Shoes For Patients With Narrow Feet?

Jenny L Sanders DPM
9/1/10 | 16499 reads | 1 comments
Podiatrists are familiar with running shoe brands for wide feet with New Balance and Brooks being the most common. What about the narrow foot? Read More.

Why It Pays To Have Good Contacts At The Running Shoe Store

Jenny L Sanders DPM
8/9/10 | 3419 reads | 3 comments
When it comes to feet, podiatrists know more than anyone, but it’s nearly impossible to stay on top of all the new running shoe styles that are out there. Many of us prescribe orthotics and those orthotics generally are designed to fit into an athletic shoe. For that reason, I think it’s important that podiatrists establish a relationship with a local running shoe store where they can send their patients to be fit properly. Read More.

Why It Pays To Ask Runners About Recent Shoe Changes

Jenny L Sanders DPM
6/29/10 | 2845 reads | 0 comments
Running shoe companies typically change their model numbers every year or two. For example, Brooks recently replaced the Addiction™ 8 with the Addiction™ 9. Unfortunately, what running shoe companies and running shoe stores do not tell you is that many times when the model number changes, so does the shoe. This can spell disaster for the athlete as the shoe that had previously been successful starts to cause injuries once the model changes. Read More.