Minimalist Shoes And Injuries: Keys To Diagnosis And Patient Education

Jenny L Sanders DPM
10/5/11 | 17467 reads | 3 comments
Footwear News reports that the emergent category of minimalist shoes represents between 10 and 20 percent of the business of runner specialty stores.1 Through July 2011, minimalist shoe sales have already totaled $30 million, up nearly twofold from the year-ago period. What this means to podiatrists is the trend toward minimalist shoe purchases is not a temporary flash in the pan phenomenon but rather a groundswell of change, at least for now. Read More.

How To Fix Squeaky Orthotics

Jenny L Sanders DPM
9/6/11 | 12259 reads | 1 comments
We learn in school that when an orthotic squeaks, sprinkling powder on the insole of the shoe before placing the orthotic in the shoe will eliminate the squeak. What do we do when this does not work? Read More.

Educating Patients About Slip-On Shoes And Flat Feet

Jenny L Sanders DPM
8/4/11 | 4653 reads | 0 comments
Let’s face it. Patients want to look stylish and have footwear that is easy to get on and off no matter what their foot pathology. Certain styles of footwear, however, can actually predispose patients to pain and injury. This is especially the case when it comes to slip-ons with elastic goring that are worn by patients with flat feet. Read More.

When Patients Ask For Recommendations On Sandals And Flip-Flops

Jenny L Sanders DPM
6/22/11 | 8527 reads | 0 comments
With increasing temperatures outside, patients will ask for recommendations for sandals. Accordingly, you will want to teach your patients about proper sandal design and fit. First and foremost, the more surface area contact there is between the foot and the sandal, the more support the foot will have. This means the wider the sandal and the higher the arch, the better the support as this will provide more of a foundation for the pronating foot. Read More.

What You Should Know About Flex Grooves And Forefoot Pain

Jenny L Sanders DPM
5/2/11 | 4947 reads | 1 comments
Horizontal grooves in the forefoot of running shoe midsoles are called flex grooves. As the name implies, flex grooves are designed to promote forefoot flexion across the metatarsophalangeal joints (MPJs). In many cases of forefoot pain, however, this is exactly where you don’t want the shoe to bend. You actually want the shoe to be as inflexible as possible in this area when patients have hallux limitus, sesamoiditis and lesser MPJ capsulitis or predislocation syndrome. Read More.

When Patients Ask About Trail Running Shoes

Jenny L Sanders DPM
4/4/11 | 3119 reads | 1 comments
Giving patients guidance on trail running shoes can be a challenge as the design of these shoes is different from non-trail running shoes. Essentially, trail running shoes have a more rugged outsole of varying degrees to facilitate better grip of uneven terrain. They are also lower to the ground and softer for better shock absorption. Read More.

Advising Patients On Proper Ski Boot Fit

Jenny L Sanders DPM
3/11/11 | 4033 reads | 0 comments
During ski season, forefoot numbness due to tight fitting boots is a common problem. Due to the hard outer shell, patients find it difficult to determine proper fit. In addition, ski boot shops typically fit boots too snug, which directly contributes to the problem. An easy way to help your patients better understand fit is to have them bring in their ski boot inner liner and footbed. First remove the footbed and have the patient place his or her foot on it. If the patient’s toes extend beyond the footbed, plain and simple, the boot is too short. Read More.

Educating Patients On Excessive Wear Of Skechers Shape-Ups

Jenny L Sanders DPM
2/9/11 | 7938 reads | 2 comments
Another patient came in today with hip pain, heel pain and metatarsalgia secondary to excessively worn Skechers Shape-Ups. These shoes are everywhere (podiatry conferences included) and many patients have jumped on this “lose weight and tone while you walk” bandwagon. Read More.

Educating Patients On The Brannock Device And Shoe Sizes

Jenny L Sanders DPM
1/12/11 | 3831 reads | 0 comments
In 1927, Charles Brannock invented a measuring device that bears his name and is still used today in most retail shoe stores. According to the Brannock device, men’s shoe sizes are one size larger than women’s and not two sizes larger as commonly believed. For example, a men’s size 9 shoe would fit a woman’s size 10 foot. There is a 1/3-inch difference between sizes so if you need to go up or down a half size, you are only changing the size by 1/6-inch. This is not nearly as much as most patients think. Read More.