Reminding Patients About Soleus Muscle Stretching To Help Counteract Plantar Fasciitis

Jenny L Sanders DPM
2/29/12 | 5952 reads | 0 comments
An American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) Podiatric Practice Survey of nearly 3,000 podiatrists found that plantar fasciitis/heel pain was the most commonly treated condition.1 A longtime hypothesis is that reduced ankle dorsiflexion is the most important risk factor for the development of plantar fasciitis.2 Decreased ankle dorsiflexion secondary to a tight Achilles tendon may lead to compensatory pronation of the foot, which can contribute to plantar fasciitis.3 Read More.

Educating Patients About Soccer Cleat Design

Jenny L Sanders DPM
1/31/12 | 6975 reads | 0 comments
A competitive soccer player recently came into my office with a new $250 pair of Adidas adiPower Predator TRX FG soccer cleats. When he asked me to evaluate his cleats, I was shocked to discover that they sat everted on the table as the image at left shows. Read More.

Teaching Patients How To Use Rocktape For Injury Prevention And Rehabilitation

Jenny L Sanders DPM
12/28/11 | 6529 reads | 0 comments
We use tape for many conditions. We use tape to illustrate what custom orthotic support might feel like. We use tape to rehabilitate plantar fasciitis. Typically, however, we do the taping as opposed to teaching our patients how to tape themselves. Read More.

Why Recommending Barefoot Running As An Alternative For Injured Runners Can Be A Reckless Proposition

Jenny L Sanders DPM
12/5/11 | 6243 reads | 0 comments
I recently blogged about minimalist shoes and injuries (see http://tinyurl.com/73qpd6x ). Dana Webb, DPM, commented on the blog, emphasizing the contention that effective minimalist running is all about technique. Here is the comment from Dr. Webb and my subsequent response. Read More.

Educating Patients About Worn Out Athletic Shoes

Jenny L Sanders DPM
11/1/11 | 4522 reads | 0 comments
We are routinely asked by patients to help them determine when their athletic shoes are worn out. Unfortunately, this is not a one-sentence answer and can be frustrating for both patient and practitioner when the question cannot be satisfactorily answered. Running shoe stores typically recommend 300 to 500 miles on a pair of running shoes but this number is useless when talking about gym shoes, hiking boots, basketball shoes, tennis shoes or any number of other sport specific shoes. Read More.

Minimalist Shoes And Injuries: Keys To Diagnosis And Patient Education

Jenny L Sanders DPM
10/5/11 | 19316 reads | 3 comments
Footwear News reports that the emergent category of minimalist shoes represents between 10 and 20 percent of the business of runner specialty stores.1 Through July 2011, minimalist shoe sales have already totaled $30 million, up nearly twofold from the year-ago period. What this means to podiatrists is the trend toward minimalist shoe purchases is not a temporary flash in the pan phenomenon but rather a groundswell of change, at least for now. Read More.

How To Fix Squeaky Orthotics

Jenny L Sanders DPM
9/6/11 | 15141 reads | 1 comments
We learn in school that when an orthotic squeaks, sprinkling powder on the insole of the shoe before placing the orthotic in the shoe will eliminate the squeak. What do we do when this does not work? Read More.

Educating Patients About Slip-On Shoes And Flat Feet

Jenny L Sanders DPM
8/4/11 | 4975 reads | 0 comments
Let’s face it. Patients want to look stylish and have footwear that is easy to get on and off no matter what their foot pathology. Certain styles of footwear, however, can actually predispose patients to pain and injury. This is especially the case when it comes to slip-ons with elastic goring that are worn by patients with flat feet. Read More.

When Patients Ask For Recommendations On Sandals And Flip-Flops

Jenny L Sanders DPM
6/22/11 | 10069 reads | 0 comments
With increasing temperatures outside, patients will ask for recommendations for sandals. Accordingly, you will want to teach your patients about proper sandal design and fit. First and foremost, the more surface area contact there is between the foot and the sandal, the more support the foot will have. This means the wider the sandal and the higher the arch, the better the support as this will provide more of a foundation for the pronating foot. Read More.