How To Address Smoking In The Podiatric Patient

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
8/30/13 | 2332 reads | 0 comments
Last year, I acted as a moderator for an American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) podcast on the subject of complications. The panel consisted of rather well-known and accomplished podiatric surgeons. The subject of smoking came up and interestingly, no panel members stated that they would interdict the performance of surgery in someone who is smoking. In fact, one panel member stated that if he were to refuse to perform surgery on a patient who smoked that he literally would have no one to do surgery on. Read More.

Are Digital Implants More Cost-Effective Than K-Wires?

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
7/19/13 | 2559 reads | 1 comments
It seems as though every major orthopedic distributor as well as a variety of orthopedic companies that you have never heard of are making digital implants in every shape and size. Typically, the advertisements for these implants are glued to the front of our publications or fall out as you open the journal. It seems as though there are more advertisements for digital implants than even for the laboratories competing for your pathology and nerve fiber density testing business. Read More.

Can Phenytoin Help Heal Diabetic And Venous Ulcers?

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
6/20/13 | 3415 reads | 0 comments
Extemporaneous compounding offers the ability to individualize treatment for the specific needs of each patient. Frequently, compounding allows the creation of topical preparations that are otherwise not commercially available. Topical preparations can provide increased concentration within the wound as they have the ability to alter local wound dynamics and chronic wound physiology without systemic modification of the selected agents.1 Read More.

A Closer Look At Emerging Research On Plantar Fasciitis And Plantar Fibromatosis

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
5/16/13 | 4818 reads | 0 comments
Here is a look at numerous recent studies on the diagnosis and various treatments of plantar fasciitis and plantar fibromatoses. Read More.

A Closer Look At The Recent Literature On Achilles Tendinosis

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
4/16/13 | 2793 reads | 0 comments
Quinolone antibiotics have been implicated as associated with an increased risk of tendon pathology and rupture. Patients to whom we prescribe quinolone antibiotics should receive advice on this potential complication. Read More.

Can Chromium Supplementation Have An Impact For Patients With Diabetes?

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
3/22/13 | 2480 reads | 0 comments
We are encountering diabetes with increased frequency in daily practice. The disease is associated with obesity, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular abnormalities, and appears to be approaching epidemic proportions. Insulin resistance precedes the onset of overt type 2 diabetes. Many of the currently available drugs utilized for the treatment of insulin resistance are associated with significant adverse reactions. The utilization of supplements presents an attractive opportunity to reduce insulin resistance without adverse sequelae. Read More.

Exploring The Potential Of Alpha Lipoic Acid For Diabetic Neuropathy

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
2/21/13 | 3984 reads | 2 comments
The treatment of diabetic neuropathy includes management of symptoms such as paresthesia and dysesthesia as well as efforts to interdict the progression of neuropathy. Although there is much discussion regarding the positive symptoms of neuropathy, such as pain or burning, it is the negative symptoms that are frequently responsible for deformity, ulceration and limb loss. Read More.

How Topical Compounding Has Worked For My Patients

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
1/15/13 | 11207 reads | 1 comments
You may have noticed the increasing presentation of the subject of topical compounded medications at our podiatry meetings. The reason for this is that the science of topical pharmaceutical compounding has advanced significantly over recent years. Read More.

The Dangers Of ‘Declaring’ Diagnoses

Allen Jacobs DPM FACFAS
12/17/12 | 1911 reads | 0 comments
The phrase “Well, I declare” is humorous when heard on television or movie entertainment portraying a stereotypical southerner. My friend and accomplished former college and podiatry school (for my colleagues who prefer to say they attended medical school, I apologize — I went to podiatry school) classmate, Marty Pressman, DPM, once commented to me that the best part of being an orthopedist is that you can “declare” a diagnosis without the necessity of certain things, such as — oh, for instance — facts. Read More.