My Top Ten Podiatric Pet Peeves

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
12/21/11 | 4179 reads | 5 comments
10. Podiatrists instructing patients to cut their toenails straight across. Where did this originate? Where is the evidence-based medicine for this approach? If everyone’s nails are shaped differently, why would everyone cut them the same? I have always told patients to follow the shape of the nail when trimming. Read More.

Resistant Plantar Fasciitis: Why We Should Opt For A Gastrocnemius Recession Before Even Considering A Plantar Fasciotomy

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
11/22/11 | 5281 reads | 2 comments
It is a rare occasion in one’s professional career to experience a paradigm shift in philosophy, even if it is on just one topic. Plantar fasciitis is the most common condition I see on a daily basis. Up to 85 percent of the time, I am able to treat it conservatively. For the past 20 years, when it came to patients who did not respond to conservative treatment or did not have associated nerve entrapment, I have done a plantar fasciotomy. Read More.

Have DPMs Abandoned Taping In Their Practice?

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
10/19/11 | 3501 reads | 6 comments
It is disappointing to hear DPMs say they do not use taping in practice, especially when their reasoning is that they only do surgery. If someone does not use taping, I believe he or she is turning away from podiatric roots, which are based strongly in lower extremity biomechanics. The study of biomechanics and its relationship to pathologies and treatment make podiatric medicine unique. Read More.

In Memory Of Richard O. Lundeen, DPM

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
9/16/11 | 4367 reads | 11 comments
On Sept. 3, 2011, podiatry lost one of its true innovators and legendary figures, Richard O. Lundeen, DPM. He was tragically hit by a car while riding a motor scooter. Although Rick had been out of podiatry for several years, his influence remains profound. Read More.

Is A New Brace The Answer For Equinus?

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
8/24/11 | 5002 reads | 1 comments
If you have been reading my recent blogs, you realize I have been writing a significant amount about equinus (see http://bit.ly/pHai03 and http://bit.ly/koOj86 ). I think equinus is underdiagnosed, undertreated and underappreciated by those who treat foot and ankle pathologies. The gastrocnemius recession procedure is a great answer for equinus but I think we have a much better opportunity to treat equinus non-surgically in the near future than we have ever had at our disposal. Read More.

Surveying The Literature To Find An Absolute Definition Of Equinus

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
7/22/11 | 3779 reads | 0 comments
“Equinus deformity is the most profound causal agent in foot pathomechanics and is frequently linked to common foot pathology,” is a quote from an article by Johnson and Christensen.1 This statement about equinus is something that is vastly underappreciated. It is profound but in my opinion, we as practitioners are not paying enough attention to it. I believe that is because there is no absolute definition of equinus. Read More.

Why Do We Overlook Equinus In Patients With Diabetes?

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
6/24/11 | 3243 reads | 1 comments
I find the extent of preventative care we provide for our patients with diabetes fascinating yet we continually ignore one of the most important factors in keeping our diabetic patients out of trouble. Equinus has been described as the most destructive force on the foot and even though we all know this, when it comes to our patients with diabetes, we often overlook equinus and concentrate on those mycotic toenails. Read More.

Why Orthotics Are Not The Answer For Plantar Fasciitis

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
5/23/11 | 9566 reads | 9 comments
There are approximately 2 million documented cases of plantar fasciitis per year in the United States. For most podiatrists, this is the most common foot pathology we see in our practices.1 The “sacred cow” in the podiatric community for plantar fasciitis has always been custom orthoses. Read More.

An Open Letter To Foot And Ankle Orthopedic Surgeons

Patrick DeHeer DPM FACFAS
4/8/11 | 5594 reads | 5 comments
Dear Fellow Foot and Ankle Specialist, I am writing this letter to your group to bring to light a worsening problem between our two groups that is being perpetuated by a handful of members from your group. We are never going to agree on which group is best qualified to take care of foot and ankle pathologies. In reality, though, there is more than enough work for all of us to be very busy. We should try to concentrate on what we have in common: the medical and surgical management of the foot and ankle, and our dedication to healing those placed in our care. Read More.