Surgical Considerations For Hallux Varus

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
3/19/14 | 903 reads | 0 comments
As we all know, in hallux varus, the first metatarsal assumes a medially deviated position and moves closer to the midline of the body. A purely transverse plane deformity, hallux varus is the most common complication of hallux valgus surgery.1 The reported incidence ranges from 2 to 17 percent.2 Congenital hallux varus is typically due to connective tissue disorders (i.e. Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) or is associated with Down syndrome and neuromuscular disorders (i.e. cerebral palsy).2 Read More.

Diagnosing And Treating Acute And Chronic Gout

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
2/20/14 | 1247 reads | 0 comments
Gout is a type of arthropathy that results from the formation of crystals. Gout may occur from either the over-production of uric acid (the cause of most cases) or the under-excretion of uric acid.1,2 Uric acid, which the kidneys excrete, is an end product of purine metabolism.2 Normal values of serum uric acid are 6 mg/dL or less in women and 7 mg/dL or less in men. However, elevated levels do not always correlate with an acute gout attack. Levels greater than 6 mg/dL simply increase one’s risk of a gout attack. Read More.

A Guide To Treating Acute And Chronic Lateral Ankle Injuries

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
1/23/14 | 2982 reads | 0 comments
Weak ankles. They are the bane of all athletes, dancers and, well … everyone. What do I mean when I say “weak ankles”? This refers to instability of the surrounding ligaments or tendons due to an acute injury or repeated injuries, leading to a chronic problem. We sometimes confuse sprain and strain. Ligaments/tendons are sprained while muscles are strained. Now there is much to discuss concerning lateral ankle sprains and subsequent instability. Read More.

Current Insights On Diagnosing And Treating Osteochondromas

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
12/20/13 | 1446 reads | 0 comments
There are many types of soft tissue masses or tumors that an individual may suffer from as well as many different types of bone tumors, both benign and malignant. These tumors have varying characteristics as well as age of onset. One can find many of these tumors incidentally via X-ray evaluation. Read More.

Essential Treatment Tips For Polydactyly

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
11/27/13 | 1720 reads | 0 comments
Polydactyly literally means “many digits.” The condition can occur on its own or from a genetic or familial inheritance pattern. The supernumerary digit may be a fully functional digit or a skin tag-type of digit that is non-functional. Polydactyly occurs in approximately two out of every 1,000 live births and about 30 percent of patients have a positive family history.1-3 Read More.

When Patients Present With Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
10/24/13 | 2578 reads | 0 comments
Tarsal tunnel syndrome is an entrapment of the posterior tibial nerve or one of its branches within the tarsal canal by the flexor retinaculum, the fibro-osseous tunnels, or the deep fascia.1-4 Sixty to 80 percent of cases have a specific cause of compression and there are multiple factors.5 • A tumor within the tarsal canal that puts pressure on the nerve • Fracture of the calcaneus with a fragment compressed against the nerve • Severe pronation that stretches the soft tissue and compresses the nerve • Enlarged blood vessels (i.e. varicose veins) Read More.

Keys To Patient Education And Accurate Diagnosis Of Sinus Tarsi Syndrome

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
9/25/13 | 4166 reads | 0 comments
A patient has been having pain on the outside of his ankle for some time and you tell him he might have sinus tarsi syndrome. The patient’s puzzled look does not surprise you and you proceed to explain what might be the cause of his pain. What is the sinus tarsi? Explain to patients that the sinus tarsi is an anatomical depression on the outside aspect of the foot that is filled with soft tissue structures: ligaments, muscle, nerves, blood vessels and fat.1,2 Read More.

Recognizing The Damaging Impact Of PAD

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
8/22/13 | 1905 reads | 0 comments
A recent Lancet report noted that in 2010, 202 million people worldwide had peripheral artery disease (PAD).1 Consider the following statistics about PAD and related complications.2 • Those who smoke are two to three times more likely to have lower extremity PAD. • Patients with PAD are four to five times more likely to suffer a transient ischemic attack or stroke. • Those with PAD are two to six times more likely to die from coronary heart disease. Read More.

Explaining PRP To Your Patients

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
7/23/13 | 2049 reads | 0 comments
When you suggest adding platelet-rich plasma to the treatment plan of your patients, keep in mind that they might not be familiar with this type of treatment. Expect some questions. What Is Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP)? Platelets are a cellular component of the blood that play a key role in the formation of a blood clot. Platelets contain and release proteins, cytokines and other bioactive factors (growth factors, clotting factors, etc.) that initiate and regulate wound healing. Platelet-rich plasma contains the following growth factors: Read More.