When To Use Skin Grafts And What Type To Use

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
9/19/14 | 217 reads | 0 comments
Skin grafting use has exploded, especially when it comes to the new products available. However, with so many products available, it is difficult to know which one to use and when. Sometimes, the question isn’t necessarily if one can use a graft for a wound can receive a graft but rather, should one use a graft for the wound? Read More.

Ensuring Prompt And Effective Treatment Of Burns

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
8/19/14 | 377 reads | 0 comments
With barbeques, the popularity of outdoor activities and many occupations surrounding hot objects, patients commonly present with burns. Thermal injuries can come from chemicals and electricity, not just from fire or the sun. We typically classify burns into three categories depending on severity and what the skin looks like: first degree, second degree and third degree.1-4 However, there is a fourth degree. Read More.

Pearls On Treating Peroneal Tendon Dislocation

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
7/17/14 | 656 reads | 0 comments
The peroneus longus and peroneus brevis tendons are prone to dislocation due to athletic activities and other factors. This makes it imperative to have a grasp of treatment options. Read More.

How To Diagnose And Treat The Sometimes Elusive CRPS

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
6/24/14 | 1066 reads | 0 comments
Chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS) can be extremely debilitating for patients and can have a sometimes elusive diagnosis. Often, clinicians might consider someone with chronic pain to be “mental.” In fact, CRPS is truly a diagnosis of exclusion.1 The following will not be a deep and detailed discussion of CRPS. My only goal is to provide you with a little more information so you don’t always assume psychological issues are the cause of an individual’s intractable pain. Read More.

Keys To Addressing Compartment Syndrome

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
5/28/14 | 661 reads | 0 comments
When it comes to compartment syndrome, trauma is the most common cause. The most common traumatic cause is fracture but compartment syndrome can also occur with burns. The injury causes compartment syndrome due to increased swelling from fluid within the compartment.1,2 Overuse injuries in exercise can also factor into compartment syndrome but the incidence is miniscule in comparison to trauma. Read More.

Hammer Time: Current Insights On Anatomical Considerations and Etiologic Factors With Hammertoe Deformity

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
4/28/14 | 820 reads | 0 comments
When considering foot deformities, there are two pathologies that we most commonly encounter: bunions and hammertoes. We have discussed in past blogs that a bunion is not just a bunion, and there is more to it. Hammertoes are just as involved. So what makes a hammertoe tick? Let’s break it down. In actuality there are three types:1,2 • A true hammertoe involves extension contracture at the metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ). There is also a flexion contracture at the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ) and an extension contracture at the distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ). Read More.

Surgical Considerations For Hallux Varus

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
3/19/14 | 1287 reads | 0 comments
As we all know, in hallux varus, the first metatarsal assumes a medially deviated position and moves closer to the midline of the body. A purely transverse plane deformity, hallux varus is the most common complication of hallux valgus surgery.1 The reported incidence ranges from 2 to 17 percent.2 Congenital hallux varus is typically due to connective tissue disorders (i.e. Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) or is associated with Down syndrome and neuromuscular disorders (i.e. cerebral palsy).2 Read More.

Diagnosing And Treating Acute And Chronic Gout

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
2/20/14 | 1571 reads | 0 comments
Gout is a type of arthropathy that results from the formation of crystals. Gout may occur from either the over-production of uric acid (the cause of most cases) or the under-excretion of uric acid.1,2 Uric acid, which the kidneys excrete, is an end product of purine metabolism.2 Normal values of serum uric acid are 6 mg/dL or less in women and 7 mg/dL or less in men. However, elevated levels do not always correlate with an acute gout attack. Levels greater than 6 mg/dL simply increase one’s risk of a gout attack. Read More.

A Guide To Treating Acute And Chronic Lateral Ankle Injuries

Jeffrey Bowman DPM MS
1/23/14 | 3656 reads | 0 comments
Weak ankles. They are the bane of all athletes, dancers and, well … everyone. What do I mean when I say “weak ankles”? This refers to instability of the surrounding ligaments or tendons due to an acute injury or repeated injuries, leading to a chronic problem. We sometimes confuse sprain and strain. Ligaments/tendons are sprained while muscles are strained. Now there is much to discuss concerning lateral ankle sprains and subsequent instability. Read More.