Assessing Vascular Surgery Options In Patients With PAD

Author(s): 
Lauren A. Fisher, DPM, Hillarie L. Sizemore, DPM, and Khurram H. Khan, DPM

The presence of intermittent claudication is a strong indicator for PAD but physicians should not rely upon this solely for the diagnosis of PAD. Ankle brachial indexes have become a mainstay in the initial evaluation of patients suspected to have PAD. An ABI reading of <0.90 is the cutoff point for the diagnosis of PAD.4 The lower the ABI, the more severe the occlusive disease.
It is the responsibility of every podiatric physician to screen for PAD, recognize its signs and symptoms, educate our patients on the effects of PAD, and refer to our vascular colleagues or primary care doctors when appropriate.
In order to facilitate appropriate referrals, it is also important to stay abreast of the most current information on technological advances that the vascular team can utilize to improve outcomes for patients.

Dr. Fisher has just graduated from the New York College of Podiatric Medicine and will be attending the Jewish Hospital St. Mary’s Healthcare PM&S 36 residency program in Louisville, Ky.

Dr. Sizemore has just graduated from the New York College of Podiatric Medicine and will be attending the Jewish Hospital St. Mary’s Healthcare PM&S 36 residency program in Louisville, Ky.
Dr. Khan is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medical Sciences at the New York College of Podiatric Medicine. He is also a Clinical Instructor at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.
Dr. Steinberg is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Plastic Surgery at the Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C. Dr. Steinberg is a Fellow of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.

For further reading, see “How To Diagnose Peripheral Arterial Disease” in the April 2007 issue of Podiatry Today. Also check out the archives at www.podiatrytoday.com.

 




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