Secrets To Obtaining 100 Percent Patient Satisfaction

Author(s): 
By Kristin Titko, DPM

    Do we all know the basics of how to make our patients’ visits satisfactory when they are in our office? What brings your patients back to your office once they have been there? What encourages your patients to send their friends, family and acquaintances to your practice? In today’s world of decreasing reimbursements for our hard work, we need to know how to work smarter so it does not feel like we are forced to work harder. Retaining patients and increasing the number of new patients we see can be easier than you think. All it requires is a little extra time and effort.     There are some simple extras you can add to your office. The reception room is your patients’ first impression of your cleanliness and attention to detail is important. Do not disappoint them. You would never consider putting a clock in your reception room but sit out in the room for a few moments and you would soon appreciate a television or at least a radio. (Remember to be selective with the channels.) A coffee maker with simple fixings can go a long way and a water cooler is clean, simple and appreciated. A small vending machine with chocolates and salty choices is a pleasant surprise but be sure it stays stocked and functional. Keep a small trashcan easily accessible. Ensure that the carpet is vacuumed at least every morning and at lunch break. Have someone tidy up the magazines throughout the day. Do not forget to keep the temperature well regulated. Your patients may be sitting for a while in the treatment room with their shoes and socks off so do not let it get too cold and uncomfortable.     Keep the staff’s food and drink out of the patient’s sight. You want an atmosphere of a professional office, not a fast food restaurant. Make sure all food areas are cleaned daily. The most important “simple extra” that may often be overlooked is location, location, location. This is not so much the location of your office but more specifically, the location of your treatment rooms. Many of your patients come to you with painful feet and have difficulty walking. Accordingly, one should strive to have ample parking close to your building, an entrance ramp and a short, uncomplicated route from the front door to the treatment room. Avoid long hallways and stairs.

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